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zande

Our Olympians are not heroes and they're not brave!

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Liv_DrSperm_sh

I've just watched a woman win the 100m fly with a world record....she had heart surgery when she was 15 and carries a defibrillator around with her....

 

Yeah, they're not brave at all....

Edited by Livsh

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peking homunculus

The main quality athletes need to succeed is selfishness.

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maxim

Also another one who agrees that these Olympians are extremely brave and are heroes to many.

 

Sure, there are a few who are not great role models (like the one who woke up late and nearly missed her event, lol :rolleyes: ) but most of them are certainly much better role models than many other well known personalities.

 

 

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j-gray
Yeah, but they don't have to pay HECS on all their training at the AIS do they? Unlike those who perform socially useful jobs, like doctors, teachers and nurses, who all have to pay the government back for the cost of their training.

 

What a strange argument, I'm not sure what your point is.

 

Most of them don't actually train at the AIS. Most of them have coaches who they pay out of their own pocket. Actually I do consider it a socially useful 'job'.

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maxim
The main quality athletes need to succeed is selfishness.

 

 

Applies not just to elite athletes but to practically all kinds of careers. Even soldiers who rise up in the ranks, they'll have to look after no.1 ultimately in order to succeed.

Edited by maxim

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JJ
They may not be heroic, but they are heroes to many.

 

I guess so. Reading through the answers in this thread, it becomes obvious that we all have very different definitions of what makes a hero.

Edited by JJ

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DEVOCEAN

Could you also imagine the courage it would take for some Israeli Athletes to compete at the Olympics after 1972.

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wilding

1a person, typically a man, who is admired for their courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities:

 

 

:hugs:

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peking homunculus
Applies not just to elite athletes but to practically all kinds of careers. Even soldiers who rise up in the ranks, they'll have to look after no.1 ultimately in order to succeed.

 

There are many many professions where selfishness is not a prerequisite. Nursing, teaching, paramedic, social worker etc. People who work in these professions may make some decisions based on their own interest, but being selfish is not a prerequisite for the job.

 

Sport does not contribute anything to society apart from entertainment. Is it really good to hold them up as heros and idols when they take government handouts just so they can achieve their personal dreams?

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~chiquita~
I hear you on the footballer thing. I once saw a write up on a footballer who I knew personally. The heading contained the words "local hero" and I nearly gagged on my breakfast. This is a person who had received a life ban from one football club for urinating in a refrigerator at a function, was a well known drunk, and had various children in various locations - none of whom he acknowledged or supported financially. However, when he was sober enough, he managed to kick a football around, and sometimes even do it well. If that is the definition of a hero, then how embarrassing for that town.

 

This made me :lol:.

 

This is why I can't stand the game and it's players. The majority of them are idolised fools.

 

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Arls01

Oh for goodness sake, chill out! What a bunch of party poopers! It always amazes me how some people can get insulted so easily!

 

 

 

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Frockme
And the good old Australian tall poppy syndrome is alive and well.....

 

They might not be heroes and brave to you but to many they are. Inspirational is another word that comes to mind. So does dedicated and disciplined.

Agree!

 

It think you'd have to be insanely brave to crouch at the starting blocks, stand on a balance beam, dive from a huge platform etc before millions of people. Not to mention the expectations put on you by the general public and media.

 

They may never have fought in a war or be dying of cancer (as a pp put it) to be a hero or brave. But what they are doing they have been working hard at for years. They are people who are at the top of their league. I respect the work they've put in to be where they are. I think they're brave to have given up a hell of a lot to be where they are.

 

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Princess.cranky.pants

I agree the word hero is used too often for footballers. But Olympic athletes work for years to compete at the Olympics. They over come many hurdles to achieve their goal and sometimes even just finishing is a Heroic act.

 

I remember a runner who was the favorite to win his event. He was in the lead and suddenly broke down. He finished his race even though he was in extreme pain and hardly able to walk. I also remember Gillian Rolton fall off her horse, breaking her collarbone. For both those athletes just finishing what they set out to do was heroic.

The Athletes from poor countries who train in adverse conditions and Paralympians who over come so many obstacles to compete. They are heroes to me.

 

 

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Soontobegran

My grandson's hero is Captain Feathersword and nobody has the right to tell him he is not a worthy hero!

Chill out people!

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MrsLexiK
Applies not just to elite athletes but to practically all kinds of careers. Even soldiers who rise up in the ranks, they'll have to look after no.1 ultimately in order to succeed.

 

Entertainment is a big one - it's no wonder that Hollywood marriages fail so "easily"

 

Could you also imagine the courage it would take for some Israeli Athletes to compete at the Olympics after 1972.

 

I had never thought of that, but yes that would be mighty brave and I don't know if there was competition after the fact or whether any Israeli Athlets had to compete - but if they did - that would have been heroic.

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Soontobegran
The main quality athletes need to succeed is selfishness.

 

:rolleyes:

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peking homunculus
I had never thought of that, but yes that would be mighty brave and I don't know if there was competition after the fact or whether any Israeli Athlets had to compete - but if they did - that would have been heroic.

 

Or stupid?

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MuppetGirl
I guess so. Reading through the answers in this thread, it becomes obvious that we all have very different definitions of what makes a hero.

 

That is the beauty of the word though, it can be applied to many different people and many different situations.

 

If asked who my hero is the answer is my Mum. She is not heroic to you, the world or to the family next door but she is to me.

 

Why does being a hero have to be limited to a very narrow definition?

 

I think the OP's post is in very poor taste and shows a lot of disrespect personally. I couldn't imagine doing some of the things our athletes do, suffering some of the injuries, working through the pain to try and try again. Such dedication, hard work and then the willingness to represent our country for barely a pittance in $$ unless they happen to be one of the lucky few who get a sponsorship deal afterwards.

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Ruf~Feral~es

When I look back at the Sydney Olympic ceremony, with Betty Cuthbert, Raelene Boyle, Dawn Fraser, Shirley Strickland, Shane Gould, Debbie Fintoff-King, Kathy Freeman - I'm happy for my DD to see them as "hero's" and role models. The olympians today are the role models of the future in a sporting sense.

 

I'm more sick of the contestants on tv competitions being called "super-stars". :rolleyes:

 

 

And the good old Australian tall poppy syndrome is alive and well.....

 

They might not be heroes and brave to you but to many they are. Inspirational is another word that comes to mind. So does dedicated and disciplined.

 

 

Yep. When will we learn? From Leisel Jones last week, the mens relay team this morning. Why can't we just sit back and enjoy the competition, win, lose or draw, as we try to teach our children?

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zande

I don't think it was in poor taste MM, and it's not a case of tall poppy syndrome either. And actually the vent was more at the Australian media, rather than the athletes themselves. I take absolutely nothing away from their hard work, dedication, commitment etc (I am talking about Olympic athletes here, not footballers), but I don't think they deserve the word heroic that is bandied about by the media. I certainly don't think the athletes themselves call themselves heroes!

 

And I do stand corrected, some PPs have given examples when an athlete might be considered brave. And another poster suggested "idol" might be a better term, I agree with that. I just fail to see how an athlete can be considered a hero.

 

I certainly didn't mean to be disrespectful and I take nothing away from the years of sacrifice and hard work, and I reiterate that my OP was directed at the media, and it wasn't just "today's" vent, I have always thought this way.

 

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Frockme
name='peking homunculus' date='30/07/2012, 11:00 AM' post='14785679'

Sport does not contribute anything to society apart from entertainment. Is it really good to hold them up as heros and idols when they take government handouts just so they can achieve their personal dreams?

yes, save those handouts for the lard arses, and future lard arses of our society who clog our hospitals because they don't believe in sport. :rolleyes:

 

All athletes start somewhere. Potential is seen and nurtured. If you stop your child from achieving their potential then YOU are the selfish one.

Edited by Malaya

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Soontobegran
I think the OP's post is in very poor taste and shows a lot of disrespect personally. I couldn't imagine doing some of the things our athletes do, suffering some of the injuries, working through the pain to try and try again. Such dedication, hard work and then the willingness to represent our country for barely a pittance in $$ unless they happen to be one of the lucky few who get a sponsorship deal afterwards.

 

 

So true.

There is an elite male Australian athlete (sprinter) who is basically homeless because of his commitment to his sport. He was forced out of the Olympic trials as he couldn't survive anymore and felt he was a burden on society.

 

We see the happy faces marching around in the Aussie Uniform, this does not mean that each of these people have an indulged existance back home.

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Chelli

Still thinking about this thread, I have to say there is an example of an athlete who I do consider to be my personal hero. He is a kid who was in our surf club and mentored my DD through her first surf carnival. He trained hard every day and so dedicated to his sport. All the nippers wanted to be just like him.

 

Eventually he was asked to join a club in Qld, where he had aspirations of becoming an iron man.

 

Not long after he got there, on a New Years Day, he was hit by a car and came very close to death - serious head injuries and needed to learn to walk and talk again. It was so devastating to hear, especially knowing how much he wanted to achieve his goals.

 

He worked really hard in rehab, and much to the surprise of his doctors and rehab team, not only did he compete in the Coolangatta Gold in October of that year, he placed a very respectable 13th! My DD's idolise him because of his strength of character and determination. I think he is a wonderful role model.

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Ruf~Feral~es
I don't think it was in poor taste MM, and it's not a case of tall poppy syndrome either. And actually the vent was more at the Australian media, rather than the athletes themselves. I take absolutely nothing away from their hard work, dedication, commitment etc (I am talking about Olympic athletes here, not footballers), but I don't think they deserve the word heroic that is bandied about by the media. I certainly don't think the athletes themselves call themselves heroes!

 

And I do stand corrected, some PPs have given examples when an athlete might be considered brave. And another poster suggested "idol" might be a better term, I agree with that. I just fail to see how an athlete can be considered a hero.

 

I certainly didn't mean to be disrespectful and I take nothing away from the years of sacrifice and hard work, and I reiterate that my OP was directed at the media, and it wasn't just "today's" vent, I have always thought this way.

 

 

Maybe you just have a different definition of the word "hero"?

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peking homunculus
yes, save those handouts for the lard arses, and future lard arses of our society who clog our hospitals because they don't believe in sport. :rolleyes:

 

All athletes start somewhere. Potential is seen and nurtured. If you stop your child from achieving their potential then YOU are the selfish one.

 

Sorry, I expressed myself inadequately. Spectator sport does nothing for society. Participation in sport is to be encouraged and provides multiple benefits. Watching sport just gives you a fat bum and a few cheap thrills.

 

How many more people would be able to participate in sport if there was more funding of grass roots sporting organisations and less of the AIS?

 

In the past, we didn't have the AIS. Sports people were amateurs and were expected to live a normal life and have sport as a hobby. I don't see why we don't go back to this model.

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