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fillesetjumeaux

There's no hope with attitudes like this

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fillesetjumeaux

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*TQT*

Whats wrong with using a dryer? I don't have one, but i never thought they were bad for the environment.

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Posh_Girl

how can a clothes line be banned in an entire suburb? :wacko:

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fillesetjumeaux

starla - very easily. It is just a town law in a lot of places (like a council by-law, I guess). It is illegal in both the towns I live in, although I don't think it's exactly policed (I had a clothesline at my old place, but my current lease prohibits me from hanging anything outside at all - I just ignore that and use my clothes airers on the deck). I believe the general view on clothes lines is that they're for poor people who can't afford a dryer.

 

And no, most dryers are electric, so no different to the Aussie ones.

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Guest ~Sal

I've come across this attitude before. It startles me every time. Apart from the environmental impact, their electricity bills must be huge!

 

Whats wrong with using a dryer? I don't have one, but i never thought they were bad for the environment.

 

Driers use a huge amount of electricity. Unless you're buying green energy, then that electricity converts to huge amounts of greeenhouse gases. Seems a bit silly when clothes dry perfectly well for free.

Edited by ~Sal

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~TCBF~

Its scary isnt it?

 

We have a dryer and we use green electricity.. So I guess I could justify using it whenever I felt like it.. But I dont.

 

We use it when we need to (seldom) and I dont have a problem with this. Its like all issues environmental, the convenience things that are costly to the environment can be used very moderately without too many ill effects.. Its when everyone decides to use them all the time (disposable nappies, dryers etc) that the costs really start to add up.

 

Wouldnt it be great if I could put my kids in a disposable nappy every now and again and not feel incredibly guilty for it, knowing that everyone else is using them only on occasion instead of all the time? Or turn on my dryer to get some clothes dry because im desperate for something to wear and not have to feel awful knowing how many people do it as a regular thing?

 

I just think its sucks that some of us have to do the right thing all the time because so many people do the wrong thing all the time.. When we could all just mostly do the right thing and save the conveniences for when we really need them..

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RainDancer

Can't they put their jeans in the dryer for just 5-10 minutes to make them softer before use? :wacko:

 

Gosh I never realised how many lame excuses people could come up with for not doing things that are a greater benefit to the environment (and in many cases, their hip pocket as well). I can't work out if it is pure laziness, selfishness, ignorance or just stupidity... maybe a combination of all of them.

 

And to make it illegal to have a clothes line... well that in itself is reinforcing the idea that it is ok to eat up fossil fuels at an ever increasing rate.

 

Will it only be when the oil and gas runs out or when we make our planet uninhabitable that people understand the consequences and ramifications of their actions? For my son's sake, I hope not! :pray:

Edited by ~raine~

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AMPSyd

We are lucky to have a house with a clothesline. I hate using the dryer - it just chews up sooo much power for, as DH puts it, blowing hot air on clothes over several hours to dry them.

 

I hate the winter because we really notice that sun dips lower, there is less drying time as we get less direct sun so often I will hang the clothes but put them in the dryer just to finish them off but I don't think all that is a waste of time. They can be out all day but in the winter still a tad damp due in the afternoon to the position out house is in.

 

I didn't think Aussies thought this way - the Hills Hoist is an Aussie tradition.

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SqueakyPeanut

that amazes me. I never would have likened a clothes line to being poor before...

 

Especially since most of America has as much sun shine as us why wouldn't you want to make use of it to dry your clothes... :wacko:

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fillesetjumeaux

In defence of the attitudes, I suppose you only know what you're brought up with. If it's been 50 years since Americans hung clothes on the line, then people of our generation would NEVER have hung clothes out, and probably don't realise it is the norm in other countries.

 

Ignorance I can understand - continuing the way you're going once someone points out a better alternative, THAT is what gets me riled.

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Wen1965

I suppose the ban is so that the area doesn't look poor with people hanging doona over balconies and stringing their undies on the verandahs. It is easier to have a blanket ban than to allow clothes drying in some parts of properties but not others.

 

One OYO unit I lived in we had a garage so we put the line in there as we had no other space for it. Just left the door open on warm, windy days.

 

I wish I could use a line at this house, we have the space but being surrounded by dirt roads they come in needing a wash :angry: . The drier and indoor clothes airing is my only option.

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babypenguin

I use my dryer mainly for underwear. But I also save my dryer load until all my washing is done and put it in together - whites/colours/darks in one dryer load. It takes 1/2 an hour to dry 1 load.

 

I also put my towels in for about 5 minutes on cool cycle after they have been hung on the line. They come up nice and soft and I can't tell the difference. I will dry them in the dryer if it has been raining for 2 or 3 days though.

 

Sometimes my house looks like a dry cleaners with wet washing on airers and every available doorknob lol.

 

I do the best I can to save energy ( i have a thread going about things we can do to help the environment- but not many people have been interested in it at the moment). If everyone just did the best they could, it would make a huge difference. Hopefully pressure from everyone will encourage people to do the right thing sooner rather than later.

 

Just getting off topic, can anyone tell me why, if plastic bags are bad for the environment (which i agree they are), why doesn't the government ban them? There are degradable bags available so why don't they make them compulsory?

 

I use my dryer mainly for underwear. But I also save my dryer load until all my washing is done and put it in together - whites/colours/darks in one dryer load. It takes 1/2 an hour to dry 1 load.

 

I also put my towels in for about 5 minutes on cool cycle after they have been hung on the line. They come up nice and soft and I can't tell the difference. I will dry them in the dryer if it has been raining for 2 or 3 days though.

 

Sometimes my house looks like a dry cleaners with wet washing on airers and every available doorknob lol.

 

I do the best I can to save energy ( i have a thread going about things we can do to help the environment- but not many people have been interested in it at the moment). If everyone just did the best they could, it would make a huge difference. Hopefully pressure from everyone will encourage people to do the right thing sooner rather than later.

 

Just getting off topic, can anyone tell me why, if plastic bags are bad for the environment (which i agree they are), why doesn't the government ban them? There are degradable bags available so why don't they make them compulsory?

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Midwitch

I live in Auckland and it rains a fair bit over winter. I wash 15-20 loads a week, very large loads in a commercial washer. I have seven kids and two adults to wash for.

 

I sold my dryer 3 years ago after I hadnt used it for 3 years. I hang everything out to dry - in winter I hang it in the garage, carport, the verandah if the rain is coming the right way, and over a clothes airer inside.

 

I see no need for dryers in warm countries like NZ and Australia.

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Jeneral
Just getting off topic, can anyone tell me why, if plastic bags are bad for the environment (which i agree they are), why doesn't the government ban them? There are degradable bags available so why don't they make them compulsory?

 

Because they are recyclable... you can take them back to the store and there should be a recycling box to put them in. They focus on green bags now cause no-one was recycling the plastic bags dispite the facilities being there.

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Amargein

Well we have a dryer, but it's reserved for if it's raining. why on earth would we waste money and electricity when we can dry them for free on a clothesline?

 

It takes like 10-15 mins max to hang out clothes on the line, plus putting them out in the sunshine keeps them smelling fresher than putting them through a dryer.

 

If anyone tried to "ban" me hanging my washing out, I'd tell 'em to get stuffed. What a stupid rule. "It looks poor", I've never heard anything so dumb....

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SqueakyPeanut

I have found that I can hang our washing in the bathroom on the clothes airers with the window open and the clothes dry even when raining. It takes a bit longer than if the sun was out, but if I hang it up before work it is dry that night.

 

So I don't have an excuse for using the dryer anymore.

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Trilogy

"Clothes lines are trashy" WTF? :wacko:

 

I can sort of see where that is coming from if there are clothes streaming from the side of a balcony in a unit block, but in a surburban backyard? How ridiculous.

 

I can't even imagine taking a wet load of clothes and putting them straight into the dryer - what a waste of electricity!

 

Yes we have a dryer but it's only used if it has been raining for days and I need to put items in for a few minutes to finish them off, or if my nappies aren't completely dry, because I don't have many.

 

If this is what people really think, what hope do we have... :(

 

ETA: Wouldn't it wreck your clothes to constantly tumble dry them?

Edited by ~sprite~

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Rainbow.Nomad

Well, you can see why Americans are so fat! :ph34r:

 

I have never owned a dryer and plan to never buy one. IMO they're such a stupid invention. Sure, my lounge sometimes looks like a Chinese laundromat but a house is for living in, it's not a showroom. ATM my nappies are strung across a line above the fire-it's on, so may as well get as much mileage out of the heat as I can.

 

Also, as well as the power they chew you could add in the actual manufacturing and transport of them.

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FeralProudSwahili

Wow, some of those responses are just weird and very ignorant. :wacko:

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Rachella77
I use my dryer mainly for underwear. But I also save my dryer load until all my washing is done and put it in together - whites/colours/darks in one dryer load. It takes 1/2 an hour to dry 1 load.

 

Me too. With 3 kids and a average sized washing line, undies and socks take up too mauch space and pegs - but everything else gets hung out.

 

Our dryer is basically a luxury item and only gets used maybe once a week on average, less in summer. As PP suggested, i agree it has much to do with what you are raised with. I remember my dad cutting the plug off our clothes dryer when i was a teenager cos i used it to "iron" my jeans in :blush: . He didn't get it fixed till we all left home :D .

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Bluemakede

:rolleyes: I used to be a member of this forum with lots of americans, and sooo many were saying the same types of things, it pretty much equalled to if you have a clothesline your trailor trash. But obviously if their clothes come up stiff from hanging them out, then they're not washing them properly.

 

Out of all those comments I'd say the one about having to take the clothes outside, and the "my DH thinks they're gay" would have to be the most stupidest reasons. But I guess alot of people in the US are very materialistic (and lazy).

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mummy*of*2

i hang everything on the line except for when it is raining or they are towels! i dont c the point in wasting the electricity

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SqueakyPeanut

When I hung my washing on the line this morning I was thinking about how poor I was and making my neighbourhood look trashy (even though you can't see over my fences)

 

:evilgrin::tongue:

 

Actually I was thinking how loveley they will smell when I bring it all in.

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KatCL

I live in Canada, about an hour and half from the border to the States, and lived in the States for a while growing up. Most of my family are down there. Yes, the attitudes are horrible, and they are prevalent here in Ontario, as well. Many people in my small town hang out their laundry (myself included :)) when the weather allows. As a PP said, it has a lot to do with how we are raised.

 

In bigger cities and subdivisions, it is banned to hang out laundry. No one, NO one, has a clothesline in their yard in many areas. One friend of mine who lives in a large subdivision is questioning the bylaw, as it goes against energy saving initiatives that we are seeing and hearing. How can we be told, "Save energy, use wind and sun to dry your clothes," and yet be threatened with fines for doing so?

 

I am grateful to have moved to my new town. Here, many families hang out their laundry, and I was very excited to use my clothesline. That said, I have only just been able to, for the last month or so, been able to use my clothesline, as the weather has been dry and warm enough to dry the clothes.

 

Although those responses are idiotic, for the most part, please remember when judging the vast majority-- it is NOT commonplace over here, nor is it possible for much of the year in the Northern States or Canada. Clothes do not dry very well in the snow and rain. It is just too cold/damp.

 

On that note, I do wish we would build homes with drying closets, as is common in some wetter European countries -- closets built around the furnace stack, with lots of racks and hooks. Very clever, IMO.

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MummyTard

I have started using my clothes line now, more for financial reasons! I hardly ever use my dryer now, only if its raining. I do however line dry my jeans and then put them in the dryer for a couple of minutes to soften them up, but its never more than 5 minutes as they are 100% dry when they go it, for towels, I love them hard and scratchy! As for undies and the like they all go on the line, can't wait to see my next bill to see if its any less!

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