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Jellybean 3

Funding for students with special needs in Primary

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Jellybean 3

Can someone please explain how funding works for kids with special needs in primary Govt versus Catholic schools? Background is that DS is currently at large affluent public school, but can't attract funding through "The program for students with disabilities", because he doesn't have a recognised disability and is not 2 standard deviations below the mean.  He has attentional, memory and processing issues that impact his learning. He is falling behind and has low self esteem because of this.

I recently enquired at a local catholic school which I'm told supports many students with disabilities, and I was assured my DS would get learning support in class/withdrawal, an ILP and termly PSG meetings etc.  So just wondering if this is typical of public vs catholic systems or is it individual school differences in how they want to send their money? thanks

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.Jerry.

Which state are you in?

Despite the fact that some disabilities are not funded, all students are entitled to reasonable adjustments to assist them to learn effectively alongside their peers.

Adjustments though may not be an aide or special class.  Adjustments mean a huge range of supports that can be put in place.  

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Jellybean 3

We are in Vic

 

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SeaPrincess

We’re in WA. The catholic school where our eldest started his primary schooling provided nothing extra for individual children unless it was funded externally. In FYOS, each class of 30 had 2 aides. Several families left because of it.

If you want to find out how genuine they are, ask if you can speak with some of the parents of children with similar needs to your own.

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PocketIcikleflakes

I think there needs to be a diagnosed disability for the school to be given additional funds. The process, criteria and how much they can get will vary from state to state though. If the child isn't eligible for extra funding there's often ways a school can work around that with their budget but that depends on how much leeway they have in their budget.

We're in NSW and DS probably won't get any funding. In WA he had four sessions a week of one on one side time. From what I can tell when it comes to non funded support it depends on the school regardless of if it's public or private.

I think at an affluent school I'd expect more support than you're getting. It's promising that the Catholic school was specific in what they would put in place though.

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.Jerry.

A disability doesn't need to be formally diagnosed for support to be given, but most states do require a formal documented disability (in certain categories) to apply funding.

In my state (Qld), funding doesn't go to the child, but to the school.  I get a lump sum and a staffing allocation for students with disability isn't separated per child -  I couldn't tell you how much each child is allocated.

But many adjustments don't need funding:  extra time to complete tasks, visual timetables, movement breaks, fiddle toys, tasks broken down/explained, quiet spaces to de-escalate, etc.  Even items like a computer / iPad / ear muffs / etc can be done in the regular school budget.

The only thing really that needs funding is t/a time or special ed teacher time.  

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*bucket*

I think it comes down to the school. I am in Vic too. My eldest DS did qualify for funding, but younger one did not (govt primary). They were never at the school at the same time, older one was at secondary school before younger one started primary. Both had PSG (Parent Support Group) meetings with Integration staff, teachers, integration co-ordinator etc. Both had ILPs. Both were supported with various accommodations . Both were extended where they needed it. The biggest difference was that older DS got aide time, and some school funded PT, ST and OT, where younger one did not. Younger one didn't even actually have a diagnosis, he was just a bit different.

So the school definitely has a say in what they do, and govt schools can accommodate various special needs. It may depend more on the staff in place as to what accommodations are made.

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