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smday

enrolling june baby in school year he turns 5

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Green Sage
1 minute ago, smday said:

Thanks Green Sage, yes that's the case. I went to a g&t program when I was younger and hated it. I wanted DS to have "normal" schooling etc. But I guess I should get him assessed instead of letting my issues come into play. Also my friend (overseas) has a 3yo who reads etc a lot more than my kiddo so I'd started to think this was normal? I've had bad experiences with MCHN but our GP is good, so I might have a chat with him

He's learned math (Even numbers, addition etc) from some cartoon 😕

 

thank you ❤️

Was it Numberblocks?? My kids love that show. And it taught my youngest, finally, to count. My youngest is just turned 5 though! And he can only count to 12. It’s a great show.

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caitiri
34 minutes ago, smday said:

Is there anything I can do to get it granted? We pulled him from childcare in April due to covid fears, but while he was there staff would often comment on his intelligence/etc. I don't want to go the IQ test route, but now that he's home with us I can see first hand how he absorbs everything sponge-like on his own and I feel like he might be better off starting school sooner.

One year at an independent school might actually be a good solution, but I'd rather put him into the local primary straight away. Maybe I should just go talk to them...

I’ve never known anyone to do it sorry but yes your best bet would be talking to the local school, or checking the department Of education website 

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AdelTwins

It’s not just academic readiness. How is he emotionally and physically?

If he was playing sports would be be smaller and less coordinated than his year level peers?

Would he cope when school camps start?

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smday
2 minutes ago, Green Sage said:

Numberblocks

that's the one - it drives me nuts because now DS keeps talking about the number 4 which is a square, what else is a square (100!), etc. 

Ok it seems I'm a bit off in my assessment of DS's abilities, I'll wait a bit (my mum says he should be able to write now, he can only write a few letters on his own) and then talk to a GP maybe. 

 

Just now, AdelTwins said:

It’s not just academic readiness. How is he emotionally and physically?

If he was playing sports would be be smaller and less coordinated than his year level peers?

Would he cope when school camps start?

These are things that worry me, he's great socially, but physically average for his age. He likes sports, I'm thinking of putting him into one of those sports programs (Ready Steady Go etc) to help on the sports side. 

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needs to get out

Numberblocks is a menace. My 4yo is doing sums with 3 digit numbers because of it :S I feel a bit sorry for his teachers in prep next year.

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smday
1 minute ago, needs to get out said:

Numberblocks is a menace. My 4yo is doing sums with 3 digit numbers because of it :S I feel a bit sorry for his teachers in prep next year.

it's a covid issue, especially since we pulled him out of care in April due to covid fears (he's rejoining soon, fingers crossed). I kept him away from tv mostly but he wants numberblocks. I'm now trying to steer him towards anything else, but not sure what.

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Green Sage
4 minutes ago, smday said:

it's a covid issue, especially since we pulled him out of care in April due to covid fears (he's rejoining soon, fingers crossed). I kept him away from tv mostly but he wants numberblocks. I'm now trying to steer him towards anything else, but not sure what.

My kids moved onto Odd Squad. It’s educational, but more fun. 

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smday
Just now, Green Sage said:

My kids moved onto Odd Squad. It’s educational, but more fun. 

Thank you! ❤️

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Dianalynch

My March ds is profoundly gifted in language and maths, confirmed by testing, he went to school at age 4, he could read fluently well before he started school, others in his class are a year older, if he was after the April cut off I would have sent him at 5 turning 6, as socially it would have been easier.
 

Maths and English can be done at higher levels no matter what grade you’re in, ds is now 6 years old in grade 1, he’s doing grade 6 maths from his grade 1 classroom, there’s no need to accelerate him for that reason. Just make sure you speak to the school well before he starts and ensure there’s something in place to cater to his needs, if he is gifted starting a year ahead won’t help that much as gifted kids can work many years ahead,  our kinder teacher spoke to the school as well which made it easier. DS’s school has mentioned grade acceleration, I’ve said not yet as he needs the social development time, and I asked how many of their grade 2s are doing grade 6 maths? None. So what does it matter if he’s doing higher level maths from his grade 1 or 2 classroom, better he stays in grade 1 and has more social development time.  His gp agreed with me. 
 

if a grade acceleration is needed, and it often is both my dh and dd were grade accelerated, better to do it  later eg grade 3 to 5, or grade 6 to 8 - when developmentally it doesn’t matter as much. 
 

I’d also suggest keeping a look out for ‘quirks’ - adhd, asd, and some learning difficulties often seem to go with extreme giftedness, not always, but sometimes. 

all the best 

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*bucket*

My understanding is you will need an IQ test, and other testing to start him early in Vic. I know of one kid that has been accepted (I'm sure there must be others though...). My younger DS was reading and doing Maths at 3, the librarian at the Primary School (where my older kids were) gave him his own card so he could borrow books with the big kids. But we didn't start him early, and haven't accelerated him. The Primary School did a great job of extension, his first high school was a mixed bag but he is currently thriving academically at another. My older DS also could have been accelerated from an academic point of view, but I have reservations about them coming out at the end of school very young (I was 16 when I finished Year 12) - I wouldn't have wanted either of my boys out in the big bad world at 16. So I was happy to keep them with their peers and with extension. Dianalynch makes great points above. Accelerating doesn't always make a big difference, if their needs are being met where they are, they still will be, and if their needs aren't being met, they probably still won't be by putting them up one level.

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dreamweaver80

I agree with others in that you should assess whether he's ready emotionally and socially rather than just focus on academics. I could read well before I went to school but my mother (a teacher) still didn't send me early. All through primary school, I went up a year for language and maths. I hated it and I don't think I necessarily thrived being around older children for part of the day. 

My 2.5 son has been able to say his ABC's for almost a year now, he can count up to 30 and back down to 1. Up to 100 by 10's.  He puts his foam numbers together to make double digits. He has every house number memorised on the numerous walks we do in our suburb. I do not believe he is gifted or exceptionally clever, I just recognise this as one of his interests and he's gotten very good at it. 

Food for thought, as a boy, he will be emotionally behind girls his age anyway as this is typical. To be one of the youngest boys in a class means he'll be quite a bit behind the girls in his class, emotionally, his whole school life. Might not be a problem at all, but could be in the teen years. 

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AllyK81

My DD is a bright spark. She was born in July. She did 4 year old kinder when she was 3 at the recommendation of her daycare centre and had this year in a private ELC 5 days a week. 5 days at this ELC - at a prestigious private school - worked out cheaper than 3 days of daycare so it was a no brainer.

They have done a wonderful job with her this year. She is reading, writing and doing sums and well prepared for Prep next year. Schools can accelerate clever kids but catching them up emotionally is harder. I would look for a good ELC for your DS.

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Dianalynch
39 minutes ago, AllyK81 said:

My DD is a bright spark. She was born in July. She did 4 year old kinder when she was 3 at the recommendation of her daycare centre and had this year in a private ELC 5 days a week. 5 days at this ELC - at a prestigious private school - worked out cheaper than 3 days of daycare so it was a no brainer.

They have done a wonderful job with her this year. She is reading, writing and doing sums and well prepared for Prep next year. Schools can accelerate clever kids but catching them up emotionally is harder. I would look for a good ELC for your DS.

My dd is a July baby and was really similar. She did end up grade skipping, but not until half way through grade 3. It was more for social reasons though, yes she needed it academically as well, but she related to older peers and was holding herself back to fit in. She is thriving now. But sending her to school early wouldn’t have been the right thing. She needed that time in the early years. She also did very well at a high quality centre when she was 4. 

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