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José

Handwriting. Fluffy thread

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José

so, I've heard if people trying to use handwriting to make judgements about a person eg because of the way they formed their letters they must be egotistical.  I suppose there is no real evidence for this type of analysis?

A work colleague has 2 very distinct handwriting styles, she says depending on her mood. I wonder what a handwriting analyst would make of that! 

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eigne

I have heard of “hand writing analysts” eg when they try to prove that so and so really did write that letter because look how they shaped the a!

Im not sure I’ve heard of linking writing style to personality though. 

i have two distinct writing styles. It depends how I am holding the pen. Used to be very handy during year 12 because I could switch when my hand was tired. 

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seayork2002

I write like  fyos child, I am also never consistent so I can start a sentence neatly and by the end it is messy. Top of the pages ok bottom terrible

So now I think about it I guess it is the way I am! lol

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Riotproof

I actually think I just get bored when writing. I really have to concentrate to have it neat and consistent the whole way through. 

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DQMission

It was one of those fringe areas of forensic research like head bumps and facial features. Its called graphology and there is no real basis for it, but of course some will find an obscure study that ‘proves’ its legitimacy. Unfortunately, in the US fringe science is often acceptable for use in criminal trials and ‘expert’ witnesses need have no nationally recognised accreditations so it’s likely at least one person over there has been convicted of an offence on the basis of that kind of evidence. 
 

hand writing can be used to identify some neurological issues though.

as for me, I have about four or five writing styles and my most used style is the worst. Like a PP, it’s closer to a child’s scrawl. For me, it all changes depending on fatigue and urgency. 

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Bandwagon

I barely write now, what with phones, computers etc. It feels alien, foreign, my hand feels awkward and doesn’t want to cooperate 😂 I always get my DH to fill in birthday cards! 

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Ernegirl

There's certainly a personality analysis aspect to graphology which may be questionable, but I don't think you can dismiss the application of handwriting analysis in cases such as fraud (e.g. forged signatures on financial docs and wills),  ransom notes etc. It's actually very difficult to  successfully replicate someone else's writing, on every aspect from letter formation to pressure on the paper.

 I personally love to see handwriting, it's an art form in itself, I'm thinking of calligraphy, the Book of Kells etc.  And you can see there's a trend for fancy "handwritten" fonts full of whimsical loops and dashes in branding and signs.  We may not all write like the Victorians, but it's still lovely to see handwriting. When you receive a handwritten card or letter, there's a personalized connection absent from a typed letter.

And there's so much evidence about the link between writing and cognitive development, reading ability, etc. Threre's also an argument that cursive writing (more so than print) helps our brains to memorise spelling patterns. It's also quite meditative. Probably tapping into ancestral memories of carving out rocks!

https://www.rd.com/article/should-schools-bring-back-cursive-handwriting/

https://theconversation.com/amp/learning-handwriting-is-more-about-training-the-brain-than-cursive-script-53679

https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/amp.smh.com.au/national/nsw/handwriting-fluency-in-kindergarten-linked-to-better-reading-abilities-20200302-p54654.html

 

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DQMission

Do you have any academic sources for that? You’ve linked opinion pieces and I would love to learn more about your assertion.

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Dianalynch
Posted (edited)

We have had handwriting samples analysed in my line of work - it’s helpful additional evidence. But of course that was to prove who may have written something, not that they were egotistical narcissists which I wish was possible, that would be truly helpful 

Edited by Dianalynch
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Prancer is coming
Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, Ernegirl said:

 

And there's so much evidence about the link between writing and cognitive development, reading ability, etc. Threre's also an argument that cursive writing (more so than print) helps our brains to memorise spelling patterns. It's also quite meditative. Probably tapping into ancestral memories of carving out rocks!

https://www.rd.com/article/should-schools-bring-back-cursive-handwriting/

https://theconversation.com/amp/learning-handwriting-is-more-about-training-the-brain-than-cursive-script-53679

https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/amp.smh.com.au/national/nsw/handwriting-fluency-in-kindergarten-linked-to-better-reading-abilities-20200302-p54654.html

 

This type of stuff annoys me as I think it perpetuates stereotypes and judgements.  Yes, maybe in some cases there is a link, but certainly not all.  This topic is very personal to me as I have one child with a writing disability (dysgraphia) and another being diagnosed.  My kid with the diagnosis has an iq that meets the school definition of gifted and also was in the triangle for his grade 3 NAPLAN reading score.  So you can have terrible writing and still be good at reading.  He has had such a hard slog, failing subjects before his diagnosis as the only way to show your knowledge at school is through writing it down.  Relief teachers will still assume he is being silly when he writes something, making him do it again, telling him off or just bringing it to the attention of the entire class (who are all aware of his writing and not keen to partner up with him in group project work around posters).

 

So I regularly see the judgement around handwriting and how people assume he is stupid.

Edited by Prancer is coming
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born.a.girl

I was actually the first year cursive script was taught in the fifties.   To be it looked childish, because my older sisters' work looked more advanced, but of course my childish brain didn't make the connection that of course theirs was more advance because of the context and the ability to write, nothing to do with the style of writing.

Nevertheless, in secret I practiced my s & t etc and used them once handwriting wasn't assessed, with the result that I have letters written two different ways in my writing.

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hmmph

I love doing calligraphy. I'm very much out of practice, but i love looking at beautiful writing. My handwriting changes quite a lot based on pen, speed, paper and how patient I'm feeling.

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Ernegirl
3 hours ago, Prancer is coming said:

This type of stuff annoys me as I think it perpetuates stereotypes and judgements.  Yes, maybe in some cases there is a link, but certainly not all.  This topic is very personal to me as I have one child with a writing disability (dysgraphia) and another being diagnosed.  My kid with the diagnosis has an iq that meets the school definition of gifted and also was in the triangle for his grade 3 NAPLAN reading score.  So you can have terrible writing and still be good at reading.  He has had such a hard slog, failing subjects before his diagnosis as the only way to show your knowledge at school is through writing it down.  Relief teachers will still assume he is being silly when he writes something, making him do it again, telling him off or just bringing it to the attention of the entire class (who are all aware of his writing and not keen to partner up with him in group project work around posters).

 

So I regularly see the judgement around handwriting and how people assume he is stupid.

Gosh Prancer, my intention wasn't to belittle anyone with writing disabilities, my interpretation of those sources was that there's generally  a connection between hand/eye/brain coordination and reading/writing abilities, I don't believe it has any bearing on intelligence or academic ability.  I'm sorry if I offended you, that wasn't my intention. I hope things improve for your son, and that the school appreciates and fosters his strengths.

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Ernegirl
3 hours ago, DQMission said:

Do you have any academic sources for that? You’ve linked opinion pieces and I would love to learn more about your assertion.

Tbh DQMission, I'm going from memory of news stories where a handwriting analyst has been brought in to assess if a document is authentic or forged. Usually in support of standard investigation techniques such as fingerprinting, DNA analysis etc. I think it's termed "forensic document examination." I don't dispute it's not mainstream!

https://www.crimemuseum.org/crime-library/forensic-investigation/handwriting-analysis/

So in this recent case **TRIGGER WARNING **rape crime, DNA proved the case, but some letters were examined in support of the prosecution.

"A handwriting expert was able to match the letters to notes found in Pinn’s car, which he had admitted writing."

https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/plymouth-news/how-cold-case-cops-snared-4384779.amp

Anyway, I apologise to the OP for diverting this thread out of Fluffyville!

 

 

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Jenflea

I'm on a US based planner FB page and oh my god, some of the handwriting you see there is just beyond perfection. 

I really wish mine was better but i so rarely use it it's hardly an issue, but I want mine to look like a fancy font, not a chicken scrawl.  I can't be neat or round or uniform, sigh, and DD is following sadly.  They don't seem to make them practice handwriting enough at school anymore. 

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Prancer is coming

@Ernegirl, thanks for the apology.  I had certainly never thought of the impact of poor hand writing until I had to live it, and the judgements people make don’t help.  I thought doctors were stereotyped with having messy handwriting, and certainly no concern about their intelligence.

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Ernegirl

Funnily enough I was going to mention the doctors cliche when I replied  - and you're right, no-one questions their mental capacity.

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Luci

I don't write much by hand these days either.  When I was first working (back when dinosaurs roamed the earth) I worked in an accounts department and we wrote all the accounts up by hand. I was always quite proud of my neat handwriting but I really have to concentrate these days if I am writing anything by hand. Last week I wrote a birthday card for my teenage daughter. I was quite proud of it until she took one look and asked me why my handwriting was so enormous. I obviously need new glasses. 

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kimasa

The pen I'm using definitely changes my writing style. 

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DQMission

kimasa, Im curious. How? 

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kimasa
Posted (edited)
26 minutes ago, DQMission said:

kimasa, Im curious. How? 

The width and glidy-ness effects my hand movements. 

IMG_20200816_145422.jpg

Edited by kimasa
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kimasa

To anyone who wears glasses but isn't wearing them right now, it's okay, it's the purple pen, not your eyes.

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DQMission

I just loved that and I love your writing!

Left handed? Do you have tone issues? I have low tone and struggle with pencils (and most pens for that matter).

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kimasa
13 minutes ago, DQMission said:

I just loved that and I love your writing!

Left handed? Do you have tone issues? I have low tone and struggle with pencils (and most pens for that matter).

Righty and no tone issues, I just have really stumpy fingers so I grip the pen closer in.

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DQMission

Ah, then you only worry about texta ink on your finger tips and maybe a knuckle or two. That would still be a pain though, I imagine.  When I write with texta I might as well finish off with some hand printing. lol

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