Jump to content
sashy

Struggling with ASD daughter

Recommended Posts

sashy

I’m a very old member returning for support.

We are in Melbourne with stage 4 restrictions.  Whilst stage 3 was on she was allowed to learn from school.  This was successful to a degree.  However, now she is refusing to attempt to work.  She is very overwhelmed.  As a result she is very ridged in her thoughts and shuts down.  I have virtually given up and struggling with depression myself.

Need some support or advice 🌸

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CrankyM

Can you talk to the school? I’ll admit that I don’t live somewhere current locked down (WA) but the first lockdown I pretty much gave up after a week as it was causing too many problems. My boy relies on the structure of school and routine and struggled immensely with school at home. Especially those things he didn’t know or understand. We had an OT come up with ideas for term 2 (but then we all got the clearance to go back) and she was working with him around the structure and ideas. 
 

Alternatively there is a line in the guidance in VIC given to schools that child with a disability and whose families are under serious stress can access schools in person. So this might be an option. Shutdowns are not good and a detrimental to all. You would need to likely contact the principal of the school your child attends though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sashy

Thank you CrankyM.  I have sent a email to the co ordinator.  Will see what happens.

🌸

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Winter frost

hugs sashy

I am not sure i have useful advice. I think the suggestion of the school is a good idea, however i suspect you have tried that.

I will say i think stage 4 is a different ball game and you and your daughter are not the only ones struggling. I am finding it much harder this time around. There will be lota of students that arr disengaged.

I think we all need to be responding and planning for the impact long term.  my only suggestion is to try and ensure she and you stay engaged with some external supports or the community even if school work isnt happening. Ie friends, some sort of online group etc. Support in this time may not come from where we usually get it.

 

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gruffalo's Child

I am so sorry you are going through this, it must be so difficult.  I’m also in WA and have 3 kids with ASD and found all 3 coped differently when we were locked down.  One thrived, one did all her work diligently but hated the isolation and one absolutely struggled to focus or do any school work, and our home felt like it was just a battleground.   I realized that I had to prioritize her (and my) mental health and our relationship  over school work, so we ended up doing very little.   My only suggestion would be to contact your school as well as any psychologist or OT she may have to see if they can suggest strategies or even alternative activities.  Maybe watching YouTube episodes could be a way to continue learning and stay somewhat engaged in a way that is more comfortable for your DD?  

I really do wish you the very best and hope you can both find a way to survive this current lockdown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silverstreak
Posted (edited)

Ah big hugs, this is not the easiest time for our families. 

My DS aged 8 with ASD is back to being homeschooled in Vic. Some things I am doing:

Breaking down tasks into as few steps as possible.

A walk mid morning, to get fresh air, burn off energy, change of scene.

DS using trampoline in between tasks.

DS bouncing on fit ball, squeezing play doh, sitting on wriggle cushion on chair when doing certain tasks (if practical), for self regulation and sensory input.

Giving DS space when I can (sometimes he likes to hang upstairs or in another room for a bit.)

Bargaining e.g. first do this, then you can do this

This is Day 1 of homeschooling this round, so we'll see how we go in a few weeks, but today went pretty smoothly.

I would definitely keep your DD's teacher in the loop, access any NDIS supports you can if you can and consider sending back to school if it all becomes too much. These are really challenging times.

Good luck and all the best!

ETA, sorry, just realised that your DD is probably a teenager, so some of these strategies may not apply. Hopefully some may help!

 

Edited by Silverstreak
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Winter frost

Actually op just reading the above i have to admit i have been using bribery a bit lately. My dd has a recent asd diagnosis but she is much younger. There are days when i can tell nothing is going to happen and days when she is ok. On the bad days i dont push it. On the in between days i pick my battles. Ie can you do this part of the writing exercise (ie write 10 sentences but dont worry about your handwriting or spelling or grammar) and you can have a pie for lunch or pick a pencil from smiggle. Obv it is harder with a teen but if you can find some sort of currency to keep her a bit engaged it may help at the other end.

 

I would not usually promote bribery but have found that my dd knows she wont always get bribed and it works a bit. No bribes on good days though. 😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dianalynch

Contact the school and let them know where she’s at - I’d probably start small, is there one thing she can manage in a day? Even just posting one comment to a teacher in one subject? Or doing one thing she enjoys from a subject she enjoys? I’d just try to keep her engaged in something, but would take the pressure off learning iykwim.  Hopefully the school will then assist with strategies, or if not Telehealth with her health professionals. 
 

Lockdown is really tough,  even harder if you have asd. All the best op. Give yourselves both a break, don’t fight it too much, enjoying something is more important than the learning at this stage imho. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...