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COVID-19 coronavirus thread #7

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purplekitty
4 hours ago, born.a.girl said:

Yes, the ABC I think had an article on this.  I was surprised to see the percentage of state owned homes because when I was looking, none of them were, and I looked at anything with a vacancy within a reasonable distance, regardless of who owned it.

Turns out most are in the country, and in fact are far more likely than city ones to have shared rooms, etc, being of an older vintage.  It's just that Covid hasn't hit there to anything like the same extent, so it hasn't got into aged care.  I would also suspect that there is less movement of staff across homes in the country, given some will be the only one for miles around.

It's a bit like the 'we are the second worst in the world with 68% of deaths in aged care' figure, which is nonsense in isolation. The UK has lost something like 20,000 from aged care - to be comparable we would need something like 7,000, yet were 'worse' with 200 ish.  Lies, lies and damned statistics.

 

Most of those reasons come back to privatisation. Where it is profitable, private companies will take over much like the private system in medicine.

Casualisation of the workforce isn't as necessary to the same extent in countries areas, nor is there the ability to work at multiple aged care facilities and the other conditions that result inn heightened transmission.

State run homes have mandated staff/patient ratios, staff qualifications and other workplace conditions.These were blocked by the Fed. Gov. from being applied to private care.

We need to consider whether isolation is the only advantage State run facilities have.

People keep asking the questions of #scottyfrommarketing but no answers are forthcoming.While they aren't the questions will continue.

Many people have family and friends vulnerable in aged care facilities,it is heartbreaking and they are really like sitting ducks.

My cynical side thinks many politicians are able to pay for private nursing at home for their relatives or maybe have confidence they are in very high fee facilities.

The conditions many elderly are in though is disgraceful.

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Julie3Girls
30 minutes ago, YodaTheWrinkledOne said:

I feel sorry for the Year 12 students, but increasingly I am starting to feel even more sorry for the Year 11 students. This pandemic could well impact their entire senior schooling, not just their final year.

Most definitely. My daughter is in yr11, with only a few weeks of term 3 left, and then she will be in year 12. She has already missed quite a few fun Senior events that they do in year 11 (because year12 is so busy).  As well as all the career planning/university open days etc. As well as some extracurriculars where yr11 is their final year to participate. 
Fortunately, her classes have all caught up on work issues from the learning from home time. But just so many little things - a biology assessment which is normally a full day excursion to a wetland centre, was done this week, as an online incursion, where they couldn’t hear most of it, and it ended up dropping out completely. No trips to the theatre to support her English work, or museums etc for her history classes. Some of its only little, but all taking away opportunities, experiences, little bits of their education.
 

And all up, just the huge cloud of “COVID 19” hanging over them. For all the seniors. Listening to the news and hearing how the unemployment figures are going to go up, and trying to make decisions about what to do with their lives after school.   It’s worrying enough as a parent.  It’s such a stressful, horrible time to be getting ready to move into the “real world” from schooling.

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can'tstayaway

@Julie3Girls I have a Yr 11 child too and I feel the same way. I try to feel grateful that we are in Australia where the impact is reduced compared to many parts of the world, but it doesn’t take away the sense of loss and missed opportunities. 

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Lunafreya

I think my dad is becoming a conspiracy theorist

 

He said last night, “They have to have a vaccine or Trump/Johnson/ScoMo are doomed”

when I pointed out one first necessarily have much to do with the other he shouted over me

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Riotproof

Nsw public schools policy now is to require evidence of a negative Covid test before kids with flulike symptoms return to school. 

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Jaffa donuts
1 hour ago, Julie3Girls said:

The kids doing performing arts have taken a big hit.

DD started high school this year and I was so proud of her auditioning and getting a role in the school musical. It was out of her comfort zone but she was really making an effort to throw herself into high school and try new things. Since lockdown started I have been crossing the days off on the calendar because it gives me a small feeling of satisfaction every morning. Last week was the dates where I had maraked on the performance nights   It was pretty sad crossing through those days and thinking about what might have been.  

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born.a.girl
1 hour ago, purplekitty said:

Most of those reasons come back to privatisation. Where it is profitable, private companies will take over much like the private system in medicine.

Casualisation of the workforce isn't as necessary to the same extent in countries areas, nor is there the ability to work at multiple aged care facilities and the other conditions that result inn heightened transmission.

State run homes have mandated staff/patient ratios, staff qualifications and other workplace conditions.These were blocked by the Fed. Gov. from being applied to private care.

We need to consider whether isolation is the only advantage State run facilities have.

People keep asking the questions of #scottyfrommarketing but no answers are forthcoming.While they aren't the questions will continue.

Many people have family and friends vulnerable in aged care facilities,it is heartbreaking and they are really like sitting ducks.

My cynical side thinks many politicians are able to pay for private nursing at home for their relatives or maybe have confidence they are in very high fee facilities.

The conditions many elderly are in though is disgraceful.

 

I must admit I was really surprised when I first started looking that there were no specified ratios for nursing staff.

Given my mother's requirements (had to be Catholic) we struck it lucky.  For all the talk about dignity etc etc it's only when push comes to shove that you find out the standards.  I was relieved when Mum was in palliative care, and mentioned to the nurse that I had been concerned , and she said that she'd left another Catholic place because they DID limit end of life opiates, but didn't at this one.  Just good luck there, plus we'd heard from someone else that it wasn't an amazing place, but their end of life care was faultless. 

With my MIL, one of the questions my SIL would ask of staff was 'how long have you been here' which was a good question, because very high turnover wasn't a good sign.  Some of them where she ended up had been there ten years. The only downside (there's so much to balance) was that they didn't have a nurse able to give opiates overnight. That would have immediately excluded it if we hadn't been two minutes away and able to call on a private service readily.   She 'died in her sleep' so I guess we got lucky twice.

 

Some of the places I looked at I just walked out of again - they may well have had superb care but they were old-fashioned places more like hospitals, some with everyone in tracksuits and a LOT of noise.  I know some residents might prefer them, but both Mum & MIL were dressed in their nice clothes all the time - which took more time and effort from the staff than a trackie.   We did choose an 'extra services' place for my MIL as it was very quiet, and had a door to outside, and it became obvious that she had serious issues with sensitivity to noise.     Not many have the option to pay the extra services fee, $50 a day, and up to $100 in some places we looked at.

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Soontobegran
6 hours ago, Lees75 said:

It’s not really an accurate stat, though, given only 10% of Aged care beds in Vic are state owned and most of these are regional, rather than in Melbourne city.

There are around 18 of these aged care facilities in metro Melbourne, the fact that they have remained virtually COVID free should not be underestimated when private facilities in similar suburbs have not been able to.

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purplekitty
9 minutes ago, born.a.girl said:

 

 

Given my mother's requirements (had to be Catholic) we struck it lucky.  For all the talk about dignity etc etc it's only when push comes to shove that you find out the standards.  I was relieved when Mum was in palliative care, and mentioned to the nurse that I had been concerned , and she said that she'd left another Catholic place because they DID limit end of life opiates, but didn't at this one.  Just good luck there, plus we'd heard from someone else that it wasn't an amazing place, but their end of life care was faultless. 

 

My Bold.

My goodness,I hope that is a thing of the past but some of these sort of attitudes still exist.

They have no place in healthcare.

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JRA
22 minutes ago, Riotproof said:

Nsw public schools policy now is to require evidence of a negative Covid test before kids with flulike symptoms return to school. 

I can understand that. Of course it is no guarantee, but a sensible idea

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born.a.girl
Just now, purplekitty said:

My Bold.

My goodness,I hope that is a thing of the past but some of these sort of attitudes still exist.

They have no place in healthcare.

Mum died in 2014, so it would have been a year or two before that - she was a reasonably young nurse.

 

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Riotproof

I think so too. Hopefully private schools follow suit. 

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purplekitty

At last some information us coming to light.

DA is still not pointing fingers, perhaps in hope of some co-operation.

The Morrison government on multiple occasions rejected Victoria's pleas to help the disability sector respond to coronavirus outbreaks and were warned several times about the need for a joint taskforce.

Victorian Disability Minister Luke Donnellan first highlighted issues within the sector on April 8, and called on the Commonwealth to extend financial support and set up a crisis accommodation response team, both of which were rejected by federal counterpart Stuart Robert.

https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/morrison-government-rejected-victoria-s-pleas-to-help-disability-sector-20200816-p55m7q.html

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Lou-bags
1 hour ago, Riotproof said:

Nsw public schools policy now is to require evidence of a negative Covid test before kids with flulike symptoms return to school. 

Wow. Don't suppose you have a link to the details? (I did try to google but couldn't luck upon it).

How are they planning to implement that? Only kids who have been sent home from school with those symptoms? Or as a result of parents providing that info when informing the school they are keeping them home? So many questions. 

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Moukmouk
57 minutes ago, Riotproof said:

I think so too. Hopefully private schools follow suit. 

Our private high school has had that requirement since school went back (Sydney). Basically when you let the school know the child is sick, they need the proof of the negative test before they can return. They have excellent remote learning for kids who are at home but well enough to learn. 

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dadwasathome
3 hours ago, Jersey Caramel said:

I think maybe there was group singing at the religious retreat... so then if you ban group singing you probably have to do the same for wind instruments.  And just to be pedantic,  the ban is on all wind instruments (not just woodwind as the SMH keeps reporting) - so brass as well. My kids play brass instruments and band has been put on hold again. 

 

Definitely really feeling for the year 12s though,  what a crappy year to finish off their school life.  :(

We were wondering about brass. The only real difference I could see was the length of tubing the air passes through (DP was a woodwind player, me brass). DS12 did his clarinet lesson today, but the teacher made no mention of band. They had been doing zoom lessons, so maybe they'll go back to that, or socially distance with a single instrument and masked teacher?

DS17 has been overall lucky, it's just the dribbling out of things. He made the music program Europe tour a couple of years ago, but I expect won't continue double bass past school. It is the sort of school that will likely get the kids back if they can next year.

I probably shouldn't even mention my choir which, like most others, is strucggling both socially and financilly. We're planning to be able to perform next may, and almost definitely Nov 2021, but the enthusiasm and money may run out before then...

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dadwasathome
1 minute ago, dadwasathome said:

We were wondering about brass. The only real difference I could see was the length of tubing the air passes through (DP was a woodwind player, me brass). DS12 did his clarinet lesson today, but the teacher made no mention of band. They had been doing zoom lessons, so maybe they'll go back to that, or socially distance with a single instrument and masked teacher?

 

Just received notification that they'll still meet at rehearsal time, but discuss home exercises and theory.

Nothing on the COVID tests (2 kids at NSW public high schools)

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YodaTheWrinkledOne
1 hour ago, Lou-bags said:

How are they planning to implement that? Only kids who have been sent home from school with those symptoms? Or as a result of parents providing that info when informing the school they are keeping them home? So many questions. 

I was wondering the same thing as well. If the reason for not being at school is simply "Child unwell", I have no idea how they could insist on seeing a negative test result before the child can return. I don't provide details about illness to school or work until it's necessary or relevant. So far, touch wood, have never been asked for details either.

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Riotproof
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Lou-bags said:

Wow. Don't suppose you have a link to the details? (I did try to google but couldn't luck upon it).

How are they planning to implement that? Only kids who have been sent home from school with those symptoms? Or as a result of parents providing that info when informing the school they are keeping them home? So many questions. 

Not sure yet. Our principal sent out an alert about it today. 
 

We already have a process where if kids are noticed having symptoms they are isolated and parents called. I’m unsure if that has actually had to happen though. Not in my kid’s classes as far as I know. 
 

Edited by Riotproof
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Lou-bags
9 minutes ago, YodaTheWrinkledOne said:

I was wondering the same thing as well. If the reason for not being at school is simply "Child unwell", I have no idea how they could insist on seeing a negative test result before the child can return. I don't provide details about illness to school or work until it's necessary or relevant. So far, touch wood, have never been asked for details either.

I don't tend to elaborate, either, now that you say that. Just "DS1 from class XX will not be at school today as he's unwell". 

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born.a.girl
12 minutes ago, Riotproof said:

Not sure yet. Our principal sent out an alert about it today. 
 

We already have a process where if kids are noticed having symptoms they are isolated and parents called. I’m unsure if that has actually had to happen though. Not in my kid’s classes as far as I know. 
 

At least it might be more likely to lead parents to keep a child home who had any Coronavirus symptoms, given we know the infectiousness is highest in those early days.  If people are already keeping them home for symptoms, without disclosing them, then they'll be without symptoms when they go back.

Not fail-safe, but at least keeps kids with symptoms out of schools.

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Riotproof

I wonder if the office will follow up on vague reasons. Really not sure as “touch freaking wood” my kids haven’t even had a sniffle. 

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IamzFeralz
2 hours ago, Riotproof said:

I think so too. Hopefully private schools follow suit. 

Yes,  the NSW Health directives apply to private schools too.   The negative test requirement is for both students and staff. 

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Ruf~Feral~es

Our schools (Private/WA) have had that in place for some time.  It really only applies if your child is sent home with symptoms.  I've had to pick DS up twice in the past couple of months, and have been given a letter on both occasions requesting that he be tested for COVID-19 and not return to school until the result was available, or a doctors certificate if not tested.  They need to report back to the medical centre at the school before going to class on their first day back.

The first time, I took a screenshot of the SMS and printed it for DS to take in with him.  The second time was 2 days before the school holidays, so by the end of three weeks off, DS was obviously fine and they didn't follow up on it.

Obviously our schools have medical centres with nurses (due to boarders etc) so they have the resources to track it.  I'm sure other schools would find it hard to enforce.

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