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lazycritter

Thinking of going back to study for two years.

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lazycritter
Posted (edited)

Thanking of a career change. I've got a BArts in architecture and I started a dip Ed to become a secondary school teacher 15 years ago but didn't get through the first term before I became pregnant and brain went to mush.

 

I'm in the photography industry (especially weddings)which is being punished at the moment and I'm sick of the fickleness of the industry. The only thing is that it has enabled me to work around the kids. If we're ever going to get to own our own house again I need to do something.  Sick of even living pay to pay. 

 

If I do a 2 year course through Deakin, either secondary teaching or tertiary I'll be 45 going on 46 by the end.  My youngest should be graduated from gr6 at the same time. 

Am I kidding myself for trying this? Should I try getting an admin job instead somewhere? Am I too old?  Should i be bothering when I have three kids on the spectrum is may going to be too hard? Are there even jobs out there in the teaching industry?  

Edited by lazycritter
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BBC

What would your teaching subjects be?

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knottygirl

I did a dip Ed. When it was still 1 year. It was definitely a full on year. The professional experience part was really hard to manage. Plenty of people in the course who were older in 40s and 50s. 
i think being older is an advantage to teaching. 

I think if you can study on campus you should though. It’s easier to not do the work at home and it’s so beneficial to meet others to work together and collaborate ect. 

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jkate_

I say go for it!  I'm halfway through my Master of Teaching and I am so happy I made the leap.  I'm also studying online (through Curtin) and I have been more than happy with the support I have had from them.  There are quite a few people in my course who will finish this course in their 40s!

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blimkybill

I graduated into teaching as a second career when I was 42. I have loved my career since then, it's been great. 

In terms of work availability, it depends on your teaching subjects and where you live. In ACT there are heaps of teaching jobs. If you can teach maths then you would probably get work anywhere. Don't know about other subjects or areas. 

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Dianalynch

Age means experience, which in teaching can be a useful thing to have. You will bring a lot to the table. Nothing wrong with young teachers, they bring great qualities too,  just there’s lots of them and like in all matters of diversity we need a balance. I say go for it. 

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CallMeFeral

It's still gonna be a lot of years till retirement from there, so do what you want to do!

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TigerQueenofSheeba

If this is what you want, then bloody oath you should go for it! 

You deserve a life and deserve to follow your dreams too. Some days the study will be hard and some days not so much. Go in with your eyes open and expect it to be hard work, but with a fantastic reward at the end! 

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Meepy

I was 46 when I started teaching.  Was a bit worried about getting a job but there is plenty of work.  Ongoing is a bit harder to get but within a year I had a permanent job that I didn't like and within another 18 months an ongoing job I really enjoy.  Best thing I've done but it is exhausting and difficult.

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FuzzyChocolateToes

Is it two years full time? You should do it! 

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lazycritter

Two years full time yes.   

 

Unfortunately it's only online or at the most distant campus from me. An hour drive at least. I'm ok with online.  One of the reasons I stopped the dip Ed was the travel in peak hour. 

I was looking through the courses again and I came across a 

 

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Bethlehem Babe

You’ll be the same age in two years regardless. 
 

Do it. I think online would be the best fit- it allows you to catch up around kids appointments and other bits and bobs. 
And if a full time load is too much, you can also drop a subject or two and only add a little bit to your time. 

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born.a.girl
2 minutes ago, Bethlehem Babe said:

You’ll be the same age in two years regardless. 
 

Do it. I think online would be the best fit- it allows you to catch up around kids appointments and other bits and bobs. 
And if a full time load is too much, you can also drop a subject or two and only add a little bit to your time. 

Exactly!

Back in the dim dark seventies, I did year 12 at night over 2 x years, then a 4 year degree over 7 x years at night.  I had people say 'you'll be 30 before you've finished'. Well, I was going to turn 30 either way, I might as well be a 30 year old with a degree rather than one who could never live independently on a female clerical wage.

 

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CrankyM

You won’t be the only one around that age. If that’s what you want to do then go for it. One advantage of being older is that you have more experience really. Mature age students bring a lot to the table. 
 

and like a PP said if the full course load it too much you can drop a unit or two and pick them up later. (6 years it took for me to do a 3 year course at various course loads, I’m currently enrolled in a masters but doing a whole piddling single unit a semester, though I’m due to pick up an extra one next semester as I went on leave semester 1 due to covid and a few other reasons. Unlike mine yours is actually a good practical degree that should make you employable. Mine is like expensive PD that won’t get used but I’m doing because work offered to pay for it). 

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lazycritter
22 hours ago, BBC said:

What would your teaching subjects be?

I would definitely be doing art.  I was going to do humanities /English as a double but now after reading that it's too hard to get a job unless it's a stem subject. 

 

I could try and refresh my maths (I did do a university maths subject one off to keep my skills when I  was 19) but I'm afraid my knowledge is gone now. 

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lazycritter

Thank you everyone!

I'm a bit nervous that my brain won't work anymore. 

There is one other masters that piques my interest and would follow on from my degree as well. While I was looking through the courses, Masters of Cultural Heritage popped up.  The ba architecture had so many off shoots and that was one of the many electives I took.  I got a HD for it without pause and the only reason I didn't go down that path at the time was not knowing I could swap to  a masters at the time, I don't know that it was even available. But then I also was a bit sick of study.

I'm not sure if there is much of there in that way,  but maybe I should consider that over teaching. 

I would probably be more passionate about cultural heritage than teaching,  but I could get to impart cultural heritage passion through to students in teaching. 

 

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knottygirl
18 hours ago, lazycritter said:

I would definitely be doing art.  I was going to do humanities /English as a double but now after reading that it's too hard to get a job unless it's a stem subject. 

 

I could try and refresh my maths (I did do a university maths subject one off to keep my skills when I  was 19) but I'm afraid my knowledge is gone now. 

When I did my dip Ed you didn’t just get to choose subject areas. It was based on your undergrad degree and how many subjects were related to that teaching area. And was different to teach junior and senior. I was originally offered only junior math  but I managed to get senior as a lot of my subjects were math based eg I did several physics subjects. 
 

1 maths subject I doubt would qualify. 

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jkate_
13 hours ago, knottygirl said:

When I did my dip Ed you didn’t just get to choose subject areas. It was based on your undergrad degree and how many subjects were related to that teaching area. And was different to teach junior and senior. I was originally offered only junior math  but I managed to get senior as a lot of my subjects were math based eg I did several physics subjects. 
 

1 maths subject I doubt would qualify. 

This is correct, at least for my university.  We had to have 6 subjects directly related to your curriculum major area (mine is Humanities) and if you wanted a minor, 4 subjects.  There are requirements on how many at first, second and third year level too.  

I didn't have enough subjects to qualify as a minor but I have studied undergrad English subjects via Open Universities to top up what I did in my arts degree.  As such I will be able to qualify with a minor in English.  

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jkate_
13 hours ago, knottygirl said:

When I did my dip Ed you didn’t just get to choose subject areas. It was based on your undergrad degree and how many subjects were related to that teaching area. And was different to teach junior and senior. I was originally offered only junior math  but I managed to get senior as a lot of my subjects were math based eg I did several physics subjects. 
 

1 maths subject I doubt would qualify. 

This is correct, at least for my university.  We had to have 6 subjects directly related to your curriculum major area (mine is Humanities) and if you wanted a minor, 4 subjects.  There are requirements on how many at first, second and third year level too.  

I didn't have enough subjects to qualify as a minor but I have studied undergrad English subjects via Open Universities to top up what I did in my arts degree.  As such I will be able to qualify with a minor in English.  

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