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qak

DD is now 12 and has had ongoing issues with constipation and bad breath. Realistically she's had the constipation all her life, I'm not sure when the bad breath started but it's all gone on for too long. Osmolax is part of her diet.

She kept a food diary for a while recently because she was complaining occasionally about tummy pain as well. This seemed to highlight dairy, so she's been *mostly* off it for a couple of weeks and all the symptoms have definitely improved.

How do we go about proving the issue - identifying if it is actually dairy/lactose/some other subset/something completely different?

If she has to go off dairy long term, I'm assuming a calcium supplement might be required?

 

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Winter frost

If you can find one you can afford it is definitely worth getting help. See your go and they can refer you to someone that can help with the process. It makes it soo much easier!

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FearsomeFeralFreak

Don’t stress. Going lactose free has been easy for my daughter. There is lactose free  milk (tastes exactly like normal milk), lactose free cream, sour cream, ice cream (nicer than normal ice cream).She still can eat cheese. An intolerance is not like an allergy so most lactose intolerant people can tolerate a small amount- it’s just a matter of finding the tolerance level.

My daughter is also gluten intolerant- that’s been a bit more difficult but generally ok. FODMAPs mess with her generally so no apples or watermelon, very limited pulses. If you cut everything out for 6 weeks and then add in slowly you pretty quickly figure out what food is a problem. Lactose is definitely the big no-no for DD. My recommendation is try, see if it makes a difference. Get the Monash university FODMAP app.

i have to admit my experience with the dietician didn’t add to my knowledge or helped really . Just confirmed what I had read myself.

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qak
10 hours ago, Winter frost said:

If you can find one you can afford it is definitely worth getting help. See your go and they can refer you to someone that can help with the process. It makes it soo much easier!

Thanks - find one what? A dieticician?

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amdirel

I would see a dietician. They can help you confirm it and will help you with substitutes and supplements etc. 

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22Fruitmincepies

If you want to elucidate between dairy and just lactose, it would be easy to introduce a couple of glasses of lactose-free milk and see how that goes. If it is lactose, she might find that a little bit is tolerable, but too much is not (my brother can have a small ice cream without any issues, but having another serve of dairy would put him in a lot of pain). Butter and hard cheese are basically lactose free (they are high fat), my mother is quite sensitive to lactose but can eat them fine. Other people cannot which possibly points to a wider dairy intolerance rather than specifically lactose. Good luck with figuring it out. 

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Etcetera

My husband is lactose intolerant - he had an endoscopy and gastroscopy and they took a biopsy to identify it.

Lactose intolerance is not too hard, depending on how intolerant you are. My husband can have a certain amount of cheese, regular butter and cream etc before it bothers him. He usually has lactose free milk. Actually the hardest thing is getting a coffee! Most places assume lactose free means you want soy or almond milk.

A few of my friends have dairy/lactose intolerance. One cannot have any lactose at all, another cannot have any dairy (including 'traces of' like in biscuits or chocolate) and another is like my DH.

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CrankyM

If dairy is an issue you can identify if it's lactose or the actual dairy protein by switching to lactose free alternatives. There is a good range available now for milk, yogurt, cheese, cream. If she is still having issues it could be cow's milk protein issue and this is more problematic. It means any dairy, lactose free or not could potentially cause a problem. Depending on the intolerance, she might tolerate a small amount she might not. Unfortunately trace dairy is found in a lot of things, but I will say it is much easier now to find dairy free alternatives then it was 10 years ago when I had a baby with a severe cow's milk protein intolerance (and as I was BFing had to be diary -and soy- free). Also, I believe the GP can test for lactose intolerance, but I'm not 100% certain. I know the cow's milk protein intolerance was only diagnosed via the process of elimination.

A qualified and accredited dietitian (not nutritionist), can be of help. You can find one via this site: https://dietitiansaustralia.org.au/find-an-apd/

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Winter frost

I think a dietician is the best option, but I concede I sometimes get confused about the difference between nutritionists, dieticians etc... ( apologies to fellow eb’ers that are in these professions). Like pp said you can probably do it yourself, I just found they had some useful advice about the process of elimination that meant I didn’t have to trawl the internet to find (my laziness/uncertainty is showing)

i love my gp and she always has the best contacts so I would go to a gp and ask for a recommendation. But it depends on if you have a good gp.

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qak

Thanks everyone. DD is almost on school hols so will have a discussion with the GP, who I'm pretty sure has a dietician they favour.

Might get a referral for myself too, stacked on too many kilos lately 😳

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CrankyM

Winterfrost In Australia a dietician is required to complete an evidence based course and register with the professional organisation and participate in ongoing professional development to keep that registration. Anyone can call themselves a nutritionist, it doesn’t have a formal body. A dietician can be both a nutritionist and dietician but a nutritionist is not always a dietician if that makes sense. This article covers the basics. https://dietitiansaustralia.org.au/what-dietitans-do/dietitian-or-nutritionist/

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Lifesgood

Rather than trying to guess I would definitely take her to a dietician and do an elimination diet to identify what is causing her problems.

 

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ytt

My DD 17 has just had an endoscopy due to terrible tummy issues, they only really popped up the last few years. Finally I asked GP for a celiac blood test which was sky high. Just found out yesterday she is celiac, her gastro said she test for everything from bacteria to lactose issues (we think she has these as well). Still waiting full review from gastro (semi rural, they only operate once a week and cancelled this weeks appointment so we have to wait one more week) but GP said he was told she is celiac.

The endoscopy cost us nothing out of pocket and only had to wait just over a week to get it.

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