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Dadto2

$25'000 stimulus package

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got my tinsel on

Why not pour the money into public housing, affordable housing, building and funding refuges?

 

The idea of giving money to those who already have a home (with or without a mortgage) makes me sick.

 

There are endless building projects that could be undertaken - the last school I worked at had 36 classes - 19 of which were small demountables (used for years K - 2) because they were too small for the older kids to fit into.

 

How many public schools need new toilet blocks? The above school was built for 400 in the early 1990s. Now has 900 students but still the same number of toilets from the original build.

 

Yes, I know that public schools are a state issue, but it makes me furious that the government can throw money at those who are already so privileged - and we would easily fit into that category.

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Behind Hazel Eyes

The proposal is pretty outrageous because it involves giving public money to individuals so that they can increase the value of their own assets. There are 1001 ways to boost the construction industry, this just stinks of pork barrelling to me.

 

This is it for me too. I think it's a horrible scheme.

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spr_maiden

In what universe would a family earning 2 above median incomes be considered low income?!

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ipsee

They won't spend money on school buildings because Kevin Rudd did that and they criticised it.

 

Also they don't want to manage anything like a program of building work. They just want to splash some money around, preferably to their own type of people.

 

My kids' school could really use a hall big enough for the whole school or a new toilet block if they were doing public infrastructure projects.

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born.a.girl

Why not pour the money into public housing, affordable housing, building and funding refuges?

 

The idea of giving money to those who already have a home (with or without a mortgage) makes me sick.

 

There are endless building projects that could be undertaken - the last school I worked at had 36 classes - 19 of which were small demountables (used for years K - 2) because they were too small for the older kids to fit into.

 

How many public schools need new toilet blocks? The above school was built for 400 in the early 1990s. Now has 900 students but still the same number of toilets from the original build.

 

Yes, I know that public schools are a state issue, but it makes me furious that the government can throw money at those who are already so privileged - and we would easily fit into that category.

 

 

Actually a scheme to upgrade school toilets due to coronavirus would be a great idea - in fact the whole water supply system to a school - remove the taps, put in tanks for water bottle refilling.

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Green Sage

News.com is now saying the income limit is 200,000 but that the house for renovation must not be worth more than 750,000.

 

Now I'm thinking less people will qualify. People with enough equity in their home loan to have the 75,000 to spend will find their house is worth more than 750,000.

 

It seems the final rules aren't available yet, but if 750,000 house value is the limit that rules out most of my city!

 

House or house and land? I haven’t seen the article, but as you say, that would rule out almost every house in my neighbourhood, land alone is 750k. But if they mean house only, (maybe because it’s also linked to a new builds stimulus/rebate and they don’t want someone building a million dollar mansion getting the discount), then that makes sense.

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CallMeFeral

News.com is now saying the income limit is 200,000 but that the house for renovation must not be worth more than 750,000.

 

Now I'm thinking less people will qualify. People with enough equity in their home loan to have the 75,000 to spend will find their house is worth more than 750,000.

 

It seems the final rules aren't available yet, but if 750,000 house value is the limit that rules out most of my city!

 

Yeah that's a weird limit. In Sydney that would rule out everything except apartments - and I don't know many apartments that could hold $100k of renos. Maybe it's a way to bias it towards rural/country areas, which is not a bad thing.

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Green Sage

 

 

 

Actually a scheme to upgrade school toilets due to coronavirus would be a great idea - in fact the whole water supply system to a school - remove the taps, put in tanks for water bottle refilling.

 

Agree, some toilet facilities are ghastly. School capital funding in general would be great. But we all know schools are a state issue aren’t they, so Morrison wouldn’t dare try to fund them.

 

(Don’t remove drinking taps though! My sons loves them, he never takes his bottle outside when he is playing, he is too busy running around, and he hasn’t been drinking much all day now that the drinking taps are off limits. I’m hoping they will soon be allowed again. They’re so convenient.)

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null

I think the reasoning behind this is to encourage people with cash to release more money than the government contributes into the local economy. It specifically targets jobs in trades and they may yet announce other incentives for other parts of the economy.

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null
Posted (edited)

dp

Edited by null

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Green Sage

I think the reasoning behind this is to encourage people with cash to release more money than the government contributes into the local economy. It specifically targets jobs in trades and they may yet announce other incentives for other parts of the economy.

 

Then it shouldn’t be income tested. Cause the people with money are the people that earn good money.

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null

Then it shouldn’t be income tested. Cause the people with money are the people that earn good money.

 

Agreed. I think means testing it is a political decision more than an economic one.

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Dadto2

 

Well, I'm guessing they've done their figures, and know a bit more than we do about it.

 

 

Yup.

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MadMarchMasterchef
Posted (edited)

Yeah, acknowledge my privilege there. Homeless charity is a good idea.

 

You weren't coming across as privileged. I fully agree its a frustrating use of taxpayer money when it helps some segments of the community and not others who need it more.

Edited by MadMarchMasterchef
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PuddingPlease

Yeah that's a weird limit. In Sydney that would rule out everything except apartments - and I don't know many apartments that could hold $100k of renos. Maybe it's a way to bias it towards rural/country areas, which is not a bad thing.

 

At a guess, the point is to boost construction in regional areas to keep those economies going. I still think it's outrageous mind you, but from what is being described here, that seems like it might be the rationale.

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Lesley225

I've had to contact a few trades recently and they've all been very busy. Do really know there will be a slowdown? People might end up delaying r demos in case this happens.

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born.a.girl

I've had to contact a few trades recently and they've all been very busy. Do really know there will be a slowdown? People might end up delaying r demos in case this happens.

 

The article I read days ago said that construction is only busy now because all of the work was planned prior to Covid, or is taking longer because of Covid.

 

The expectation was the construction would fall off a cliff in six months time.

 

Many companies will make working from home, at least for some workers permanent, meaning office new accommodation needs will be stagnant for a long time.

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littlepickle

I have three large projects that I would like to get done that comes to approx $50,000 - across the three trades that I need all are too 'busy' to come and even quote.....Crazy

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born.a.girl

I have three large projects that I would like to get done that comes to approx $50,000 - across the three trades that I need all are too 'busy' to come and even quote.....Crazy

 

 

That's why this isn't a project for this week, or next month. It's a project that will start paying off in six months time, when construction as a whole hits a big hole. A lot of jobs are taking a lot longer than anticipated due to Covid, so it's no surprise they're busy now, but that's not going to last.

 

It's been talked about for a few months now, how construction in six months will be a huge issue.

 

A recession isn't pretty.

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wanting3

I work in a business which supplies the construction industry with product. We are anticipating a sharp fall in in product sold in around 3 to 6 months as builds are completed, with no new builds in the pipeline.

This is when there will be contractors who need to have new work to keep going, and be able to pay staff, including apprentices. If these contractors go under, who is going to hire the new apprentices coming out of TAFE. Isnt there an incentive at the moment to apply to TAFE to learn a TRADE?

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Crombek
Posted (edited)

.

Edited by Crombek

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MerryMadrigalMadge

Yep my central heating broke down a couple of weeks ago; they said just about all their install work had dried up, they were surviving on repair jobs. Had a technician out the next day.

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Green Sage

Yep my central heating broke down a couple of weeks ago; they said just about all their install work had dried up, they were surviving on repair jobs. Had a technician out the next day.

 

Did you get it replaced? I need a replacement, and I’m selfishly hoping for a good price due to reduced demand. But I haven’t called around yet.

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little lion

We have just hit the first recession in 29 years. I think the age group of EB means that very few were affected significantly by the last one. GFC was a blip.

 

I’d like to hear more about what advice you have on this. I was a child in the 90s so am aware that I don’t truly understand what recession in Australia will mean.

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born.a.girl
Posted (edited)

I’d like to hear more about what advice you have on this. I was a child in the 90s so am aware that I don’t truly understand what recession in Australia will mean.

 

Well, I don't have much advice, just fear of what it will mean.

 

I've seen a number of references here to people having lived through the GFC as though it's comparable, but it was a blip in comparison with a real recession.

 

I've worked through three, early seventies, early-mid eighties, and early nineties.

 

Cleverly started my own business at the same time as having a baby in 1990 - not the best timing.

 

I think every recession's a bit different too, and some hit some parts of the world and not others. .Some countries like Iceland and Greece were smashed by the GFC so it's not automatic that everyone suffers badly.

 

I should imagine this is one of many projects, both federal and state, which will try to plug holes in the economy.

 

In the early nineties construction collapsed, my electrician became bankrupt, the architect for the house we were planning on building was out of work. My sister was out of work for 12 months (very experience clerical worker).

 

Interestingly this Guardian article, written last November, about the early nineties says that 60% of the workforce will not have worked during a recession. There were commercial buildings everywhere half completed, some for years.

 

The only advice I'd have to people working, is save your job at all costs, and understand that if you need to look for a new one, it will take a while, but it's not you.

 

People will still leave jobs, women will get pregnant, people will move overseas, people will retire.

 

 

ETA: The one good thing this time, is that unlike other recessions where all of the unemployment happens behind the scenes, unless it's a large company, this time a huge lump has happened at once, and even if the government doesn't think so, I think at least community attitudes will be different to those (eg) who work in areas that are simply not allowed to operate.

Edited by born.a.girl
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