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lucky 2

Bringing a newborn home in 2020

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lucky 2

Hello, I was wondering how new parents are managing bringing home a newborn in this time of restrictions in face to face contact with support services.

I'm thinking of more phone contact with midwives, child health nurses, but less physical support.

 

Are you babies getting weight checks?

Is there help with breastfeeding problems?

Etc, etc.

 

What's it like out there in the burbs?

 

Are you ok?

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Soontobegran

Sorry I am not answering your question here and I am not sure about the post natal care but the antenatal care is most unsatisfactory.I would gather that PN care is less than stellar.

My friend's son and his partner are having their first baby, she is 22 weeks.

She has not met a doctor or midwife face to face and the phone appointments are a disaster with each of the two ( one with midwife one with doctor ) being completely useless with neither having her history accessible, neither gave her what I would call important antenatal advice, she has had no urine testing, no observations, nothing.

She had her 12 week and her 20 week scans and neither consults had her results to reassure her.

She has the usual discomforts of pregnancy and despite being a registered nurse she is new at anything baby.

She got to 20 weeks and had never had her tummy palpated and since she had not had foetal movements she was convinced she was no longer pregnant.

 

I got her to come to my house and I masked and gloved up and listened to the FH with my doppler....this was the first time she had any joy with this pregnancy.

I conducted my own version of an ante natal consult and answered all her questions as best I could.

She knows I am retired and my registration lapsed last year but she did not care......

She has another phone call consult in 6 weeks.

 

I am hoping that my the time she is in her last trimester she sees someone face to face to discuss birth options etc and I hope that by the time she delivers in September she will actually be able to have some somewhat regular post natal care.

She can not be the only one in this position.....it is very sad.

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Kallie88

I'm due August. Very different pregnancy experience to above, I've had 2 telehealth appointments so far, next at 28 weeks will be in person, before that they were normal in person. All bloods and urine tests done as normal. Thankfully being #4 at least i know the drill, I'd hate to be a FTM through all this. I'm hoping that by August this will be returning to something more resembling normal, but bracing for it to instead be second wave chaos. Worst thing for me will be my mum and close family not being there for the birth and meeting this bub for who knows how long after.

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Soontobegran

I'm due August. Very different pregnancy experience to above, I've had 2 telehealth appointments so far, next at 28 weeks will be in person, before that they were normal in person. All bloods and urine tests done as normal. Thankfully being #4 at least i know the drill, I'd hate to be a FTM through all this. I'm hoping that by August this will be returning to something more resembling normal, but bracing for it to instead be second wave chaos. Worst thing for me will be my mum and close family not being there for the birth and meeting this bub for who knows how long after.

 

I think that is the difference. Being a FTM really requires a different level of care.

Her first face to face she believes is 32 weeks. I have no idea how this can be thought to be satisfactory. There must be so much slipping through the cracks.

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~LemonMyrtle~

Someone I know just had her first baby. The hospital experience was the same awful sh*t show that I experienced 5 years ago, so sadly that hasn’t changed. Only this time she wasn’t allowed any visitors, (which was kinda a good thing, visits in the hospital are exhausting)

 

She didn’t get any pre-baby classes! She and her partner went into the birth almost blind except for a few dodgy online videos they sent her.

 

No idea what happens now she is out of hospital, but her baby is small and will need weighing, and she will need lots of breastfeeding support. But I think her mum is just going to break every rule and be there every day instead. But that’s still not as good as professional support.

 

I’m really worried about all the new mums out there, especially the first time mums. They need support and I don’t think they will get it. There won’t be any mums groups, and mums groups were so good for me. And there won’t be visits by helpful relatives, and there won’t be services like cleaners to fall back on. It’s going to be so hard.

 

Sorry OP if you’re pregnant. This post is a bit negative. My advice would be to just break the rules, put yourself first, set up as much personal support as you can, because the system won’t be what it used to be.

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blackcat20

A friend of mine is home with a newish baby and I know shes struggling with the lack of support. No mums group, no MCHN check ins. And a small baby too, so concern about weight gain, feeding etc. Its a really tough time to be a new/first time mum.

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lucky 2

Thanks for responding, about pregnancy, birth and the post birth period.

There is probably a thread about it somewhere!

 

I worry about new first time parents, small babies, feeding problems etc.

 

Can I suggest you keep giving loud feedback to the providers about your experiences and please demand support if you are worried about your baby.

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lucky 2

I work in this space and we need to do more to support you. x

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wallofdodo

Yes, its something I think about too, not pregnant or with a baby just remember how scary it can be.

 

Was thinking about a buddy program where people are matched up with an experienced mum and they can video chat, for reassurance, but it may be a hindrance more than a help

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rosie28

I have two pregnant friends, both going private with my OB. They’ve had a great experience so far, with a couple of Tele health appointments but most in person. The only sad but so far is their husbands can’t go to scans with them, which for one of them, who lost a baby at 12 weeks last year and found out at the scan, has been very difficult. The OB is just fantastic though, and is going above and beyond. They’re 28 and 24 weeks. A friend going public has had almost no support, no face to face appointments, it’s a disgrace.

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Kucingcantik

I'm 18 weeks with my third.

 

I have had my face to face booking appt in mid March - just before restrictions kicked in here in SA.

 

Since then I have had my 12 week scan, but have not received any of the risk results nor had anyone review them. As I had not yet been assigned to the midwifery group I wasn't quite sure where to call to get them or how I was supposed to receive them, I couldn't recall what happened with my 2nd and my 1st I went private in a different state so compeltely different.

 

I have my morphology scan booked for next week and will then meet one of my two assigned midwives for a face to face appt in 2 weeks.

 

Apart from the results from the NT scan, my care has seemed the same as my last pregnance. The main impact on me has been the lack of exercise classes available. I had wanted to be doing pilates/swimming etc. I also wanted to be going to ABA meetings as I am quite isolated and don't have a mum's group.

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IamtheMumma
Posted (edited)

We're ramping up our EMS (more staff, 7 days a week) to help with early discharges but its not up to par. We've had a number of readmission due to mastitis, low weight gains and infections. Had they stayed in hospital for 3 days as normal, this may have prevented the repeat admission for a longer visit.

 

A current FTM has significant bfing problems. I, and others, have spent hours with her and bub. Bub is now attaching and feeding but mum isn't feeling confident and doubts herself. She lives 2 doors away from me. I really want to tell her she can send her husband to knock on my door 24/7 so I can help her continue her success because I fear she will end up re-presenting with mastitis and low weight gain. But its unprofessional despite my honourable intentions.

Edited by IamtheMumma
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crazy87

I am 22wks with #2 and it certainly is quite different. I'm just glad its #2 and I am going private, so all appts have been at normal times in person - so all that has been as normal, not lacking.

 

The only difference is that all appts and ultrasounds must be attended alone, which is a bit of a shame but I can completely understand why.

 

Im just crossing everything that it is all a bit more normal in September! I'd love my mum and other child to visit!

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lucky 2

Sounds familiar IamtheMumma, it's frustrating, I also feel like putting a sign outside my house saying I can help!

I won't.

Trying to help with bfing problems over the phone is limited!

In Vic, MCHN will do weight checks but as I said above, ask for help.

The squeaky wheel does get the oil, if you don't make contact with services they won't go looking for you.

That's not fully true, the services are there but sometimes the restricted service is not enough.

We have to keep families safe.

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PhillipaCrawford

A friend who is a lactation consultant tells of mums being sent home immediately.

No support, 1 mch visit.

Teleconferencing for breast feeding if the midwife can manage it - in other words limited administrative support.

 

weigh your baby by standing on your own scales without baby and with baby etc.

 

She was being contacted through ABA by lots of terrified mums.

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Bethlehem Babe
Posted (edited)

A friend who is a lactation consultant tells of mums being sent home immediately.

No support, 1 mch visit.

Teleconferencing for breast feeding if the midwife can manage it - in other words limited administrative support.

 

weigh your baby by standing on your own scales without baby and with baby etc.

 

She was being contacted through ABA by lots of terrified mums.

 

It’s pretty sh*te that a volunteer organisation has had to pick up this slack. Don’t get me wrong, we are lucky to have the aba, but they shouldn’t be the only resource. Especially considering they are volunteers and likely to have kids at home themselves and they have to lobby for funding every few years. And they’ve reported a significant increase in call volume.

 

 

I’ve heard about new mums freaking out about the runny newborn poo because they had no idea they were runny. No prenatal classes, no mums/sisters/friends visiting. It must be scary to be a new mum.

Edited by Bethlehem Babe

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Daffy2016

I’m 9 weeks with no 2 and I’ve been lucky so far - perhaps because I’m in SA?

 

I had my first appt with my GP over the phone, then she dropped scripts and referrals for bloods to me in the car. DH was allowed to come with me for the dating scan and will come for the 12 week scan. I met my GP in person last week for more referrals and I have my 12 week in person at the hospital at the end of May.

 

This is public so feeling very fortunate.

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blimkybill

I am a bit mystified that services have not been able to do any better than this. My colleague who is expecting her first is at least doing the full antenatal classes via Zoom. I would have expected much better from maternity services, ie adapting rather than just pulling back. .

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NannyPlumPudding

It would be so hard for first time mum's. I had little external help with my first but I had my mum and amazing in laws who lived around the corner. Without their support I wouldn't have gotten through.

 

Slightly off topic but a good friend of mine has actually started up a virtual mother's group video call thing. She has contacts to midwives, lactation consultants, sleep helpers etc and they are having them come in doing guest speakers. From what I can see (and I don't pay much attention as it's not targeted at me) it has become incredibly popular. So kinda the same as a proper mum's group but it's not run by the Govt but rather two mum's who were at home with young babies themselves!

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~LemonMyrtle~

I am a bit mystified that services have not been able to do any better than this. My colleague who is expecting her first is at least doing the full antenatal classes via Zoom. I would have expected much better from maternity services, ie adapting rather than just pulling back. .

 

Even as a private patient, as a first time mum, I found post birth support to be pretty poor, sometimes abysmal. And this was pre-covid.

Doesn’t take much to go from bad to worse I guess.

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Mooples

I have a friend who is pregnant with her second and all appointments have been over the phone and her husband hasn’t been allowed at any scans as yet (she’s almost half way) which he’s really upset by.

 

My brother and his wife had a baby last week. She was private so had face to face consults with her ob the whole way though but went home after 48 hours instead of the usual 4 night stay. The hardest bit for them was not seeing their older child and not having the visit in hospital. They were desperate to get home to be back as a full family unit again.

 

Dh and I have been discussing another for a while but as soon as this sh*t storm started I said no way do I want to be pregnant during any of it so we have put all plans on hold for at least 6 months, probably closer to 12.

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IamtheMumma

I am a bit mystified that services have not been able to do any better than this. My colleague who is expecting her first is at least doing the full antenatal classes via Zoom. I would have expected much better from maternity services, ie adapting rather than just pulling back. .

 

It all comes down to funding or more accurately, lack there of. Women's services are always underfunded and covid hasn't changed that.

 

 

Our antenatal classes have ceased. Despite our offers to record them and upload them to the hospital's website, it hasn't progressed any further.

 

Some evidence based links that may be of help.

 

https://www.facebook.com/EvidenceBasedBirth/ - videos on a number of topics for pregnancy, labour and birth

 

https://raisingchildren.net.au/newborns/breastfeeding-bottle-feeding - fantastic website overall. This link has a lot of information about breastfeeding. Videos and FAQ.

 

https://raisingchildren.net.au/newborns/videos - common questions relating to newborns including how to like changing a nappy and swaddling.

 

https://rednose.org.au/ - safe sleeping practices and baby equipment safety.

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lucky 2

As above!

Telehealth was planned for the near future so that didn't take too long to get up and running.

The focus has been on safe birthing/core business, afaik, up to now.

Because we have done well with the outbreak, it should give services space to catch up and improve their offerings.

Not only has education been sidelined for consumers, it's been sidelined for staff.

Double danger!

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Soontobegran
Posted (edited)

Telehealth appointments do not garner the necessary information if they are all you get during your pregnancy.

 

For me so much depends on face to face, establishing a relationship is so much easier when you are looking at the person. When it comes to reading behind the lines, looking for cues.....I just don't think we can expect our patients to trust us with their care if we are just a voice reading off a check list often without them knowing any past history or asking to repeat a history already given several times.

 

Honestly I think both ante and post natal care could have been continued in their previous form even in a CV-19 environment if there were tweaks made to ensure the safety of patients and staff.

 

The repercussions of this will be obvious in months to come. There is no way you can teach and assist with breast feeding over the phone without the help of hands on from someone.

Edited by Soontobegran
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blimkybill

It all comes down to funding or more accurately, lack there of. Women's services are always underfunded and covid hasn't changed that.

 

 

Our antenatal classes have ceased. Despite our offers to record them and upload them to the hospital's website, it hasn't progressed any further.

 

 

It''s a shame you have not been able to offer the antenatal classes via zoom instead. Have the relevant staff been redeployed elsewhere? Or do you just not have the computers/time/IT expertise to set it up?

 

Do you think full antenatal and post natal services will resume soon in most states? I would hope so, that would have to be a top priority to get up and running, along with elective surgery and dental which already have the green light.

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