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katpaws

What can you do and not do under restrictions?

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katpaws
Posted (edited)

Ok, some dumb questions but I am confused by what one can and can't do under the restrictions and each state/territory seems to have different restrictions. I am looking at the news and guidelines and I can't find the answers to my questions. And yeah, I know common sense should prevail but that seems to be limited at the moment.

 

Can someone meet with their partner, in a non-home environment (following social isolating etc), if they do not live together?

 

Can someone travel a long distance (say 100km) to provide support to someone who is struggling under the current circumstances? (for example, make sure they are eating and undertaking exercise, meet in a non-home environment)

 

Can I pick my teenage daughter up from her workplace (retail)?

 

Can a parent enforce court orders for their child to go to NSW to visit them?

 

I am in Victoria.

Edited by katpaws
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blimkybill

I think the answer is yes to all.

Definitely yes to number 2 under caregiving

Yes to number 3 under travel for work.

Less sure about 1 as this one varies by state

4, well parents are supposed to maintain parenting plans.

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hills mum bec

I think the answer is yes to all.

Definitely yes to number 2 under caregiving

Yes to number 3 under travel for work.

Less sure about 1 as this one varies by state

4, well parents are supposed to maintain parenting plans.

 

I agree with this except for number one. I think visiting a partner is fine but you would have to go their house or they would go to your house, you can't meet in a public place. I read a news article about a couple being fined for sitting in a parked car because they didn't have a valid reason for being away from their house.

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Veritas Vinum Arte

You could meet in non home environment if you were going for a walk (with 1.5m distance) and actively walking. If you stop to chat that is a no no.

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Mooples

Gosh I feel like a bunch of handmaids, I know the reasons for the restrictions are very different but only allowed out in pairs and only to go shopping, no stopping to talk, definitely no groups, stay at home as much as possible.

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Silverstreak

With picking up your child from work, I wouldn't think that would be a problem, you are driving for a reason and ensuring your daughter's safety by getting her home safely.

 

Not sure re parenting plans.

 

Re meeting up with your partner from a different household in public, I'm not sure of that either! I did read something the other day about the intention not being to "split" up couples who don't live together, but not sure how this is going to work in practice if you're not allowed to have visitors, not allowed to sit in a car together and have to socially distance whilst walking. Maybe a partner is allowed to visit another partner's home? Please someone correct me if I'm wrong.

 

Re driving to check up on someone, one of my parents is dropping off meals to my sibling once a week, as they have learning difficulties. I would have thought that was fine, as long as people are weighing up the health risks and not meeting up unnecessarily.

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It's Percy

In WA you wouldn't be able to drive the 100kms. Strict regional borders are in place and you can't leave your region. Its to stop it from spreading to regional areas that don't have the health system structures in place and also to stop it from getting into aboriginal communities.

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Silverstreak

Ooh good point re 100 km, I guess it depends where the 100 km point is in your state?

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*Andi*

I hope the driving for caring duties is okay - I'm in Victoria and I'll be driving 50km next week to take groceries to my nan. She lives alone and at 90yo is self-isolating obviously. I live the closest out of her children and grandchildren.

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born.a.girl

Victoria back-flipped on meeting a romantic partner. Initially the police minister was quite clear about it, but that was reversed.

 

That said, the only clarification from them seems to o.k. 'staying with or meeting with them':

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-03/coronavirus-rules-restrictions-can-i-go-fishing-visit-relatives/12112446

 

 

Personally, we're not allowing it with daughter's boyfriend.

 

Firstly he half lives here anyway and we're all comfortable with each others' presence. Secondly he has a very big family, so going back to the granny flat at his parents' (who are both still out working each day), where he technically lives, means mixing with a lot of people.

 

Just because the government doesn't forbid it, doesn't mean it's a good idea.

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laridae

Driving around your local area looking for teddy bears in windows because it was raining and you didn't want to walk in the rain? (not me, came up on a local page)

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blimkybill

I hope the driving for caring duties is okay - I'm in Victoria and I'll be driving 50km next week to take groceries to my nan. She lives alone and at 90yo is self-isolating obviously. I live the closest out of her children and grandchildren.

What you are doing is actually essential for your nan's safety and wellbeing. It is definitely acceptable.

 

Victoria back-flipped on meeting a romantic partner. Initially the police minister was quite clear about it, but that was reversed.

 

That said, the only clarification from them seems to o.k. 'staying with or meeting with them':

 

https://www.abc.net....atives/12112446

 

 

Personally, we're not allowing it with daughter's boyfriend.

 

Firstly he half lives here anyway and we're all comfortable with each others' presence. Secondly he has a very big family, so going back to the granny flat at his parents' (who are both still out working each day), where he technically lives, means mixing with a lot of people.

 

Just because the government doesn't forbid it, doesn't mean it's a good idea.

But what aren't you allowing? Aren't you saying he is living with you anyway?

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wallofdodo

Can you go for a drive just for the sake of getting out of the house. If you don't stop anywhere, just need a change of scenery for a while?

 

In Victoria

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#YKG
Posted (edited)

Can you go for a drive just for the sake of getting out of the house. If you don't stop anywhere, just need a change of scenery for a while?

 

In Victoria

 

Honestly I do that every night, I leave at 10 to the loop and get home 10:45 go to bed. I never stop or get out of my car. There are so many police cars out, no one has pulled me over yet.

 

I’m in VIC as well, I only at work or home, a drive is good for my mental health.

Edited by #YKG
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got my tinsel on

What you are doing is actually essential for your nan's safety and wellbeing. It is definitely acceptable.

 

 

But what aren't you allowing? Aren't you saying he is living with you anyway?

 

I think it's a stay here with us OR go home to your parents (and siblings), one or the other.

 

Going backwards and forwards, increases the risk to both households.

 

I don't think that's an unreasonable request to make, especially with b.a.g.'s family health considerations.

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born.a.girl

 

 

But what aren't you allowing? Aren't you saying he is living with you anyway?

 

Sorry, not allowing him to go backwards and forwards, like he was until now. We're opposite side of town, so he'd often stay for days, a week or two, depending on where his work was, which was all over the place.

 

I said he could live here, or live at home, not spend time at both.

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Prancer is coming

I think it is worth looking at the spirit of the new laws. It is to save lives and stop the spread. If what you need to do is essential for your health and well-being, then do it. But also assume the people you are seeing could be infected.

 

Personally, if you don’t live with your partner I don’t think it is essential to see them. Plenty of ways to communicate with them.

 

and depends what you mean by driving to support someone. If you are dropping them goods, that is fine. I am not sure about having a coffee or a meal with them, they would need to be pretty depressed or you have huge concerns. I would try and do whatever support I could over the phone and take them cooked meals.

 

if your daughter lives with you, no problem picking her up. If she doesn’t, can you maintain social distance in a car?

 

my understanding is court orders need to be followed, at least in my state. Though going interstate would mean periods of quarantine potentially so one would hope the parents involved could negotiate.

 

I think it is easy to find loop holes to fit your situation. Just stay at home if you can. This is why we have people locked up in hotels for quarantine as they felt they had compelling reasons to go out.

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~Peahen~

Can you go for a drive just for the sake of getting out of the house. If you don't stop anywhere, just need a change of scenery for a while?

 

In Victoria

 

My daughter is turning 15 next week and this is all she wants, to go for a family drive. She understands we can't stop anywhere but it's what she wants. She absolutely loves going to "ta tas". We were meant to be on a holiday in a rental house for her birthday. We've cancelled of course. She's been great about it all, cancelling our holiday, cancelling her birthday get together around the fire. The dear thing just wants to get out for a ride in the car now.

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#notallcats

I read on news.com a couple were fined for sitting in their car, after police concluded they didn't have a reasonable excuse for leaving their house. So they are being very strict, unless there is more to the story.

 

https://www.news.com.au/national/nsw-act/news/coronavirus-restrictions-man-fined-1000-for-eating-a-kebab-on-a-bench/news-story/c9e2ed2f9262caeb81f995aacc3ad276

 

 

Someone said somewhere in a thread days ago, don't ask yourself "can you" but "should you". This has been working for me. I can go to the supermarket every day, but should I? No. Visiting a partner? No. Visiting a distressed friend over 100km? No, sorry. If you have concerns for her safely, call the relevant authorities. Picking up daughter? Yes (unless she is in walking distance). Not sure about the forth one, I think that one is for a lawyer. I hope they can't be compelled to.

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surprisebaby
Posted (edited)

We own a hobby farm 60km from our home. We normally go there for weekends. Will still do so but will not shop or even go into the local town like I normally do, or stop on the way there or back. Its just us on 200 acres so pretty isolated. :) . DH has to feed the cows etc anyway. Tending to livestock has to be an exclusion.

Edited by surprisebaby

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1ds1dd

Walking my dog along our beach side area today there were police walking up to cars with people sitting in them just admiring the views and moving them along.

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wallofdodo
Posted (edited)

Interesting, we aren't planning to stop anywhere, just need to get out. Thanks for the input everyone

 

Will weigh it all up.

Edited by wallofdodo

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Hollycoddle

Interesting, we aren't planning to stop anywhere, just need to get out. Thanks for the input everyone

 

Will weigh it all up.

 

Yeah I don't get this one either as you aren't actually coming into contact with anyone, your car in this scenario is like an extension of your home. I've been allowing my kids to come in the car to the shops as long as they stay on the car, just to get them out of the house. I think the couple being booked for sitting in their car was too much, they weren't actually putting anyone at risk.

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laridae

 

 

Yeah I don't get this one either as you aren't actually coming into contact with anyone, your car in this scenario is like an extension of your home. I've been allowing my kids to come in the car to the shops as long as they stay on the car, just to get them out of the house. I think the couple being booked for sitting in their car was too much, they weren't actually putting anyone at risk.

 

More people on the roads mean more car accidents, which adds to the toll on.the health system. Plus you need to buy petrol after a while, increasing the risk at petrol stations.

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born.a.girl

More people on the roads mean more car accidents, which adds to the toll on.the health system. Plus you need to buy petrol after a while, increasing the risk at petrol stations.

 

Yes, I think it's got as much to do with this as anything else.

 

Using common sense, a drive for a bit is highly unlikely to be a problem.

 

You can imagine though, if they said 'o.k. to drive into the country but don't stop for petrol'.

 

They want people to stay in their own area so they can identify hotspots. If enough people don't do that, then their job is made harder.

 

For those desperate to get out, get lost in your own suburb, then walk around a block - it's amazing what you see when you're walking, compared with driving.

 

Same with people saying 'what's the difference between grandma and a day carer the same age?'. Difference is doubling the risk. If we said o.k. to visit grandma: 'what's the difference between grandma and great aunt?'.

 

Like the physio in the age the other day wondering what the difference was between her and a masseur, pondering the fact that the virus doesn't discriminate. Difference is one's nice, one's health.

 

 

We're not trying to totally remove all risk, we're trying to remove enough of it, that we flatten the curve.

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