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Ozquoll

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Green Sage

finally did a bunnings click and collect.  Got 4 bags of lawn top dressing, 3 bags of compost, some tomato seedlings and a jasmine plant. Going to be a busy weekend. 

Need to decide what to do with the jasmine, its for the back fence, to mask the smell of the neighbours chickens.  I probably need a stand alone arch or tellis, to prevent it taking over the actual fence.  But, I also dont care if it does take over the fence since its the neighbour with the smelly chickens. I think a stand alone arch will work best.  Might need another bunnings click and collect. Annoying.  Might plant it anyway, and see how it goes, its mostly shade, so it will either die, or grow slowly, until its at fence height.  Its an experiment.  

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MsLaurie

You could use string or rope to run some extra lines along the fence to give the jasmine some intermediate grab lines, without the fuss of proper trellis?

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Green Sage
3 minutes ago, MsLaurie said:

You could use string or rope to run some extra lines along the fence to give the jasmine some intermediate grab lines, without the fuss of proper trellis?

yeah i was thinking this.  Actually i have an old dog pen I can use, I can nail a panel or two of that to the fence. That would work.

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Sancti-claws

Warning - our Jasmine has taken over our fence (despite a nice respectable trellis in front) and trying to trim it back requires full hazmat suiting as it is very sappy and flicks as you try to cut.

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Ozquoll

Went out to do a snail search-and-destroy mission after a rainshower...and discovered that snails like eating bird poo 😧. There was a gang of them crowding round a big bird splat on the concrete like it was a Michelin-star meal 🤢

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Ozquoll

How annoying - finally decided a hedge of Willow-leafed Hakea was just the thing for a difficult spot in our corner garden, but they are not to be found for love or money 😦. Actually, they CAN be had for money - $41 each for advanced ones, and I need ten of them 💰😵. I'd much rather buy small cheap tubestock but they are sold out everywhere online. 

Hmmph!

EDIT - just found them on the website of that annoying tutu man for $25, which is a bit more doable than $41 🤔

Edited by Ozquoll

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Etcetera

It snowed yesterday! I was worried how my garden would hold up especially as I had some teeny tiny alyssum sprouts but everything seems to have recovered well 🙂 I've been doing a ton of work in the garden and had just planted out a bunch of herbs, strawberries and flowers. 

It was my birthday a few days ago and I got some mini greenhouse seedling trays and just sowed a bunch of seeds. Eggplants, capsicum, tomatoes, zucchini and other squash, mustard greens and a few types of spinach.

I'm excited to get to this stage. We didn't get here last year so it'll be interesting to see how things grow this season.

So much work to still be done. I need to make a bed for the asparagus seedlings I just bought. And I want to put in a trellis arch into the orchard, thinking climbing beans over it. 

 

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Etcetera

Oh and I need to dig a hole for the frog pond were making from an old bath I picked up months ago. Very excited about that project!

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MsLaurie

Need some ideas of smallish trees that will work in a pair of big cylinders about 90cm across (not quite pots as open to the soil below, but will constrict root growth a little), that will serve sort of as an entryway.

My initial thought was jacarandas but they’re a bit unreliable in Melbourne. 

I want something that will tolerate being confined, and that is a bit showy with flowers or foliage, and will work as a pair. Nothing with spikes as it’s a reasonably high traffic spot. Preferably a native as most of the yard will be natives, and we back onto a reserve. Ideas?

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can'tstayaway

My initial thought was a crepe myrtle but it’s not a native.

For a native option, what about pruning a lillypilly into a standard?  It would add a touch of formality to an entryway, they’re pretty tough (depending on variety you select) and they produce pretty red fruit in summer which is decorative and attracts bird life.

I have used melaleucas as an entry for a garden walk.  I kept them pruned so they stayed tidy in their bulbous shape which is kinda like a conifer. I’m not sure they’d like being in a cylinder though.

Callistemons are pretty but again, I’m not sure they’d like having their roots constricted.  They’re also not long living trees.  The rule of thumb in SE Qld is that you get about 7yrs of life out of them, and maybe stretch it out further with pruning.  It’s not that they either up and die immediately but they lose vigor and go straggly, lanky and stop flowering.  They produce flowers for nectar feeding birds and insects.

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Green Sage
17 hours ago, MsLaurie said:

Need some ideas of smallish trees that will work in a pair of big cylinders about 90cm across (not quite pots as open to the soil below, but will constrict root growth a little), that will serve sort of as an entryway.

My initial thought was jacarandas but they’re a bit unreliable in Melbourne. 

I want something that will tolerate being confined, and that is a bit showy with flowers or foliage, and will work as a pair. Nothing with spikes as it’s a reasonably high traffic spot. Preferably a native as most of the yard will be natives, and we back onto a reserve. Ideas?


 

I think lillypilly is a good idea. It’s slow growing, easy to maintain, pretty hardy, and can be pruned to shape. The berries are edible too.

personally, I’d do fruit trees though. Matching apples for cross pollination. Or maybe a lemon and a lime.  2 plums. There are lots of people growing fruit trees in pots so lots of advice out there, and tours sound huge, hood enough for a little fruit tree. And the blossoms are gorgeous in spring, and foliage and fruit are pretty too. I love edible plants.

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MsLaurie

Hmmm not citrus- too many spikes! But apples or plums could be rather gorgeous!

Another idea was maybe crepe myrtles...

Also wondering about some of the dwarf flowering gums? Has anyone had much luck with them?

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22Fruitmincepies

Crepe Myrtle or Lillypilli would be my suggestions. I’ve got lillipillis in pots and they were kept pruned to a shape (no longer, we got lazy) and looked fantastic. 

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YodaTheWrinkledOne
19 hours ago, MsLaurie said:

Need some ideas of smallish trees that will work in a pair of big cylinders about 90cm across (not quite pots as open to the soil below, but will constrict root growth a little), that will serve sort of as an entryway.

My initial thought was jacarandas but they’re a bit unreliable in Melbourne. 

I want something that will tolerate being confined, and that is a bit showy with flowers or foliage, and will work as a pair. Nothing with spikes as it’s a reasonably high traffic spot. Preferably a native as most of the yard will be natives, and we back onto a reserve. Ideas?

Is it too cold for a tuckeraroo? Native, evergreen, nice leaves. 

 

I quite like this search site for plants https://www.gardeningwithangus.com.au/plant-search/

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Ozquoll
21 hours ago, MsLaurie said:

Need some ideas of smallish trees that will work in a pair of big cylinders about 90cm across (not quite pots as open to the soil below, but will constrict root growth a little), that will serve sort of as an entryway.

My initial thought was jacarandas but they’re a bit unreliable in Melbourne. 

I want something that will tolerate being confined, and that is a bit showy with flowers or foliage, and will work as a pair. Nothing with spikes as it’s a reasonably high traffic spot. Preferably a native as most of the yard will be natives, and we back onto a reserve. Ideas?

Not native, but standard ficus trees would look wonderful. 

Perhaps a native conifer? Daintree Pine (Gymnostoma) or Callitris? 

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Ozquoll
3 hours ago, MsLaurie said:

Hmmm not citrus- too many spikes! But apples or plums could be rather gorgeous!

Also wondering about some of the dwarf flowering gums? Has anyone had much luck with them?

I have dwarf flowering gums on my bush block and they are lovely, but I don't think they'd do well in pots.

Re apples - Woodbridge Fruit Tree Nursery in Tasmania has a gorgeous apple/crabapple cross called Huonville Crab. The leaves and branches are purplish, the flowers are stunning deep pink, and the apples, though small, are edible fresh and have red flesh. It's a showstopper plant. 

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Ozquoll

Sometimes this gardening business is just TOO SLOW! I started some cuttings a month ago and I *think* most of them have rooted but I can't tell unless I grub them out of the pot 🧐🤪😟. Maybe I should use one of those clear plastic pots next time so I can see the little rootlets developing 🤔

Grow, little cuttings, grow!!

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Sancti-claws

I just read a trashy book that had a gardening theme running through it - but their vegie patch had a full harvest by the end of 6 weeks!!!  Why can't I have that?

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molinero
On 01/10/2020 at 2:45 PM, MsLaurie said:

Need some ideas of smallish trees that will work in a pair of big cylinders about 90cm across (not quite pots as open to the soil below, but will constrict root growth a little), that will serve sort of as an entryway.

My initial thought was jacarandas but they’re a bit unreliable in Melbourne. 

I want something that will tolerate being confined, and that is a bit showy with flowers or foliage, and will work as a pair. Nothing with spikes as it’s a reasonably high traffic spot. Preferably a native as most of the yard will be natives, and we back onto a reserve. Ideas?

For natives you could try one of the many native hibiscus varieties, or an eremohila (which often spot-flower throughout the year). I grow a few varieties of both, they are quite hardy and the flowers are stunning, Meringur Isaac is my current favourite. I disagree about callistemons, some of the smaller cultivars do fine in pots, but the large red traditional ones -  no they will become more like a proper tree.

For other native options you could check out wax flower shrubs, or even some fancy tea trees, Nana Rubrum and Burgundy Queen are super beautiful. Rubrum seems to flower on and off throughout the year where I live (warm temperate).

Jacarandas are awful for root systems, very invasive, but if you wish for a  jacaranda they do come about in dwarf variety from time to time which should do fine in pots. An exotic hibiscus could also work.

I echo other people's comments about a small fruit tree being ideal in those sized pots, there are countless varieties that could suit.

Camellias and standard Azaleas are other ideas that come to mind if you are after the flowers.

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