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anon1071

Is 5:2 intermittent fasting recommended by doctors and other professionals?

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anon1071

I was speaking to someone today that has done really well on 5:2 and it’s something that I’d consider if it’s an actual proper thing that is recommended by professionals like doctors and dieticians.

 

Has anyone’s Dr recommended it to them?

 

Or is it just another fad?

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CrankyM

I know a few people on here who have had it recommended to them via the medical profession. Maybe have a look at the intermittent fasting thread.

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#YKG

None of my Drs or my dietician have recommended it when we talked about it. None of them are of the opinion that it’s healthy and doesn’t encourage a good relationship with food.

 

They made it clear what they recommended for me vs what they recommend for another patient is different and they base their recommendations on individuals.

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joeyinthesky

My health & wellbeing-minded GP didn’t directly recommend it, but heartily endorsed it when I asked (She had all of Michael Mosley’s books in her bookshelf.

 

Since Sep 2019, I’ve completely turned around my high cholesterol, lost 20+ kilos and have made a huge difference to my low energy/mood. I also went from having 3-4 serious migraines per month, to maybe 1-2 in the last six months. Works for me!

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Bono25

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#YKG

I think it’s helpful to distinguish between things like 16:8 and 5:2.

16:8 allows a person to maintain a healthy sustainable diet within a daily time frame. Where as 5:2 is quite different, it has you eating “normally” 5 days a week and severely restricting calories 2 days a week. It’s neither healthy or sustainable for majority of people. It needs to be acknowledged that restricting calories as low as 500 per day is not healthy for adults.

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Caribou

I much prefer the 16:8 Fasting method.

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Grrrumbles

My GP did but my dietician is against 5:2. It didn’t work for me and I am now the heaviest I have been.

 

My GP is vegetarian, doesn’t have children and works overseas regularly. I don’t think her relationship with food is the same as many of her patients and it is probably not an area she is particularly skilled in.

 

I won’t be taking advice from her again on nutrition as she gave different but still bad advice to DH as well.

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CallMeFeral

Since Sep 2019, I’ve completely turned around my high cholesterol, lost 20+ kilos and have made a huge difference to my low energy/mood. I also went from having 3-4 serious migraines per month, to maybe 1-2 in the last six months. Works for me!

 

Wow!

Nothing that dramatic here but I have maintained/lost some weight (had started a path of gaining) - but most notably my cholesterol went from the bad range to the normal range. That had been the main purpose of my going on it, so that was a great relief.

 

The best thing is that it forces me not to binge at night when the kids are in the bed.

This is almost the sole reason I can't do the 16:8. That's my favourite part of the day! (and when I would find it most impossible to avoid food).

 

It’s neither healthy or sustainable for majority of people. It needs to be acknowledged that restricting calories as low as 500 per day is not healthy for adults.

 

Do you have some evidence for this? Caloric restriction as an extended thing can be dangerous but 36 hours is hardly starvation, and there were a bunch of health benefits documented by the people who did it. I'm curious as to the reputable evidence that it's dangerous.

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Lesley225

There's a study reported on in the SMH today on mice s showing a lot o fc health benefits from intermittent fasting.

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IamzFeralz

I get the impression it’s not a settled science, there is still much debate over which diets work best.

 

The fasting diets remind me a bit of the early hype over fish oil for ADHD etc with very promising initial results and personal testimonials but which didn’t bear out in the long term.

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Caribou

IF isn't really about starvation it's about shifting your eating window. You still eat 3 main meals a day. Just by shifting your eating window you limit the chances of snacking which in turn limits the chances of gaining weight.

 

If I hold off eating until 11:00 in the morning, I have weetbix then, lunch at 2 and then dinner at 6:30 with the family. which is much better than what it used to be, 5:30 eat breakfast, snack at 8, again at 10, again at 11, lunch at 1pm snack at 3, and dinner at 6. the snacks were killing my weight loss.

 

Since doing IF, I have:

 

- Lost 15kgs to date

- Gone from obese to overweight range (5kgs from healthy range)

- No longer need blood pressure medication

- Insulin levels normalised

- Monthly cycles no longer erratic

- Sleep has improved

- More energetic, less lethargic

- Gone from size 16 to 12

 

The last one is just an added bonus, but it's more about moderating what you eat. whether you do 5:2 or 16:8 meal planning and calorie tracking is a major part of making this successful.

 

As for long term sustainability? I find the 16:8 works better long term, because it's so easy to integrate into daily life. I have learned to be more mindful of what I purchase when I'm out and about. and what happens when I reach goal weight? Then keep going, but up my calorie limit to maintenance calories opposed to weight loss calorie limit.

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