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South Coast

Extension in early primary years

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South Coast

Bit of a general question..

 

DS got a letter the other week in his bag explaining he will be doing Maths and English extension with a teacher coming into class each day for a period of time.

 

I'm just wondering, is this quite standard? As in, say a class of 26 kids, would 10 or more be doing extension or would it only be 4 or 5?

 

Just wanting to get an idea if this is quite standard for kids to do this. Or is he a bit smarter than I thought he was :)

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smilinggirl

Wouldn't it depend on the schools policies around this? Can his teacher give you an idea of numbers?

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PrincessPeach

We have 11 kids out of a cohort of approx 100 doing extension (they were hand picked for the composite class specifically because they could handle the work - exact words told to DS's best friends mum).

 

So i dont think there would be a big group.

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José

I would think it would be very individual between schools for a variety of complicated reasons.

Best to ask the teacher.

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Dianalynch

It depends, I found in earlier grades more were, then it tapers off. Also depends who else is in the class, cohorts can be quite different to one another. When he starts doing the class ask him how many are in the room. If he is in the extension class then yes he is probably academically bright.

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AllyK81

I think each school would be different. You should ask your son's teacher.

 

DS school runs extension within the class - I.e. a more advanced group.

 

DD is the only kid in her kinder class taking literacy with the Preps. There are only 20 girls in her class, though.

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CrankyM

How old is he? It’s likely dependent on the cohort. We don’t hear anything about this sort of stuff until yr 5/6 when they run an extension program. But if a child needs extension there is some sort of differentiation in the classroom.

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South Coast

Thanks for this.

He's 6 and in Grade 1 at suburban Catholic school in Melbourne.

 

Got a bit more info out of DS last night - he said there are 4 of them in his group and they sit at the back of the class with a teacher while the rest of the class does what they normally do - Usually just for the morning session a couple of times a week...

 

I guess its good they are catering for him.

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robhat

It'll vary from school to school, but typically extension work would be given to those who need it, which in most cases is probably the top 10%. So in a standard class of 30 kids you may have 3 kids, give or take one or two. In our school there are 4-5 classes per grade and they typically shift the classes around for maths so that all the top students are in one class and extended there. Some small schools may actually group 2 or more grades together, so you may have 2-3 kids from grades 3 & 4 doing extension maths together.

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AdelTwins

At our school maths extension is approx 15% of the children in grade 3. Not sure about other year levels.

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MadMarchMasterchef

DS school runs extension within the class - I.e. a more advanced group.

 

Ours is like this. SA public.

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Ivy Ivy

At my daughter's school during year 1 or 2 they pulled about 8-12 kids out of the 3 full classes (those had about 23-4 in each class, so 80 students), and sat those 8-12 kids in a little group during maths lessons doing "extension maths activities"

 

... which basically seemed to involve 3D stuff like building forts and 3D shapes and various similar tasks. I got the impression it was to give those 8-12 kids something to do while the rest of the classes did stuff they already knew; I was never convinced it was terribly useful but maybe I'm wrong.

 

Anyway it happened during the non-graded-classes-maths-experiment year. As soon as the year group returned to graded maths classes the next year, we were told the top maths class basically was the extension class. They seemed to race through the curriculum, finishing by May-June, then play building models in the library for the rest of the year....

 

Her school has a disinclination to extend beyond into the next year's curriculum even for capable students. God knows why, as most of the top class students are heavily tutored and know next year's stuff anyway.

 

Anyway the upshot of all of this palaver is ... my daughter will become good at building 3D models?!?

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