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Minnie80

First words

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Minnie80

Hi,

 

My daughter is 13 months old and has no words.

And the problem is that I don't know if this is normal or not because my 4 year old has mild ASD and had receptive and spoken language delay. He's fine now though and speaks really well. But the point is my experience with him was unusual So, it's hard for me to figure out what is normal and what is not. So,I'm curious, when should I expect a first word?

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Veritas Vinum Arte

A “word” is any utterance used repeatedly for a specific term. Even animal sounds.

 

Eg “li” was light and “di” was crocodile..... but it took me ages to work those out.

 

Does your child babble?

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eigne

I think it could be normal. I remember mine only had 2 words at 18 months, and none at 12 months. Can’t shut her up now!

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Jenflea

13 months is pretty early to worry.

 

I think DD had a few half words, or sounds for things at that age, but not many.

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Minnie80

A “word” is any utterance used repeatedly for a specific term. Even animal sounds.

 

Eg “li” was light and “di” was crocodile..... but it took me ages to work those out.

 

Does your child babble?

 

 

She does babble yes. But so did my son. He was actually an early babbler. I think he started at 5 months. My daughter started at nine months.

I actually just asked my friend and she said that when her daughter went to daycare at 15 months, she had "many words."

As I said, I don't know what is normal. But I feel she should be at least saying "mama"

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Jenflea

"mum" was one of the later words for DD.

She was about 17 or 18 months before she said it.

Do you use "mama" to her? Do you model speaking and using words etc?

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PrincessPeach

13 months is really way too early to be worrying about words.

 

My yongest didnt have his first clear words until much closer to 18 months (my first has a significant speech delay) & that is perfectly within normal range.

 

Also according to our speech therapist, dada will generally be the first word you understand clearly- it's soemthing to do with the motor plan for word formations.

 

As for the kid with many words at 15 months, the only kid I know who was like that is my 'baby' cousin - he's also has genius level IQ & was diagnosed with aspergers.

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CrankyM

Babbling is good. It's the precursor for speech. Modelling speech and it will help (that's what a speech therapist would tell you anyway). Also I never got mum until much later then dada.

 

My "normal" child didn't say mum until he was 16-17 months. He was unusual in that he had a few words around that age. Around 8-10. But they were things like "yum" for food. "ba" for his brother. "mooooooo" for cow and similar. This child was exposed to a lot of modeling of speech though. I mean a lot. he was attending regular speech therapy sessions with his brother from 6 weeks of age... I narrated our life for what felt like the first 4 years of my younger child's life and used every single game and situation as an opportunity to work on speech with my older child and my younger one was exposed to it. (And due to his own ADHD diagnoses the child talked. all. the. time. Even when you couldn't understand a word he was saying as he tried to talk as fast as his thoughts were flowing).

 

A "Word" at that age, and pretty much up to 18/20 months is any sound associated with something on a consistent basis. It includes animal sounds.

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Veritas Vinum Arte

Yes dada is easier to form than mama.

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Lunafreya

I think my DS’s first word was “ma” and that was because he was imitating the cats. He was 15 months.

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I'mBeachedAs
Posted (edited)

I'm going to put on my speech pathologist hat here and say that yeah, I'd be watching pretty closely. I'll dig out some norms which may assist. I know the people saying 'mine only had 3 words at 18m and now he's fine' are only trying to help but the reality is that we just don't know which kids will be fine and which ones will go on to have long-term language learning needs with all the academic and literacy implications of that.

 

Edit: these are some 12 and 18 month resources from speech pathology Australia if you follow this link: https://www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au/SPAweb/Resources_for_the_Public/Children_Communication_Milestones/SPAweb/Resources_for_the_Public/Communication_Milestones/Communication_Milestones.aspx?hkey=fb6753df-a757-4c4a-8100-aaebdd4451fd

Edited by I'mBeachedAs
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3babygirls

I'm going to put on my speech pathologist hat here and say that yeah, I'd be watching pretty closely. I'll dig out some norms which may assist. I know the people saying 'mine only had 3 words at 18m and now he's fine' are only trying to help but the reality is that we just don't know which kids will be fine and which ones will go on to have long-term language learning needs with all the academic and literacy implications of that.

 

Edit: these are some 12 and 18 month resources from speech pathology Australia if you follow this link: https://www.speechpa...00-aaebdd4451fd

 

That link was really quite interesting.

 

I would have thought no words at 13 months would be concerning, however it seems both of mine are early talkers. The 11 month old doesn't quite have as many words as her sister did at that age, but she can easily say maybe 10 words. My eldest would have close to 20 words at 1, and has never stopped since...

 

For her 12 month check was the GP worried at all?

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CrankyM
Posted (edited)

I'm going to put on my speech pathologist hat here and say that yeah, I'd be watching pretty closely. I'll dig out some norms which may assist. I know the people saying 'mine only had 3 words at 18m and now he's fine' are only trying to help but the reality is that we just don't know which kids will be fine and which ones will go on to have long-term language learning needs with all the academic and literacy implications of that.

 

Edit: these are some 12 and 18 month resources from speech pathology Australia if you follow this link: https://www.speechpa...00-aaebdd4451fd

 

I realised after I wrote my post that it might come off as saying wait it out. And missed Minnie's post about the babbling not happening until later. Which personally would worry me, but only because I remember raising the issue with people when my oldest son wasn't babbling at 6 months, then at 9 months and finally at his 12 month check up...

 

Minnie - I would keep an eye on it and keep reviewing how things are going. You can't predict what is happening now as to what is going to happen. If she happens to be autistic like her brother, well there is nothing you can do to change that.

 

Keep talking, modeling language, getting on her level and play games that encourage language development. If in a couple more months she still doesn't seem to be communicating start the process to see a speechie around 20 months. Most of what speech therapy at that age looks like is fun and games and teaching the parents who to encourage language development at home. She could have a delay, she might just be a late talker.

 

But also be aware of what "words" can be. At that age they are not clear words.

Edited by CrankyM

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Minnie80

I'm going to put on my speech pathologist hat here and say that yeah, I'd be watching pretty closely. I'll dig out some norms which may assist. I know the people saying 'mine only had 3 words at 18m and now he's fine' are only trying to help but the reality is that we just don't know which kids will be fine and which ones will go on to have long-term language learning needs with all the academic and literacy implications of that.

 

Edit: these are some 12 and 18 month resources from speech pathology Australia if you follow this link: https://www.speechpa...00-aaebdd4451fd

 

Yes, this is what I was telling my husband. My brother, my cousin and so many others were late talkers and have turned out fine. But that is not the case for everyone. Plus we already have a child with speech delay and ASD.

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Minnie80

I'm really confused about babbling though. Some sources say that babies begin to babble between 6 to 9 months, which means that my daughter was within the normal range. Other sources say that babbling starts at 4 months. I don't know which is the accurate one.

There are some positives though. She responds to her name and she points. Two things my son didn't do for a long long time.

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MadMarchMasterchef

What about her hearing? It could be worth getting that checked as a starting point.

 

My DS is 10 months, as pp mentioned he has a lot of context specific sounds more so than words. EG he makes an 'ee-oo' sound when he plays peekaboo.

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Minnie80

What about her hearing? It could be worth getting that checked as a starting point.

 

My DS is 10 months, as pp mentioned he has a lot of context specific sounds more so than words. EG he makes an 'ee-oo' sound when he plays peekaboo.

 

I can check, but I'm pretty sure her hearing is fine. She responds to her name, to basic commands like "say hi," "clap" and "kiss." But it doesn't hurt to check.

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I'mBeachedAs

I'm really confused about babbling though. Some sources say that babies begin to babble between 6 to 9 months, which means that my daughter was within the normal range. Other sources say that babbling starts at 4 months. I don't know which is the accurate one.

There are some positives though. She responds to her name and she points. Two things my son didn't do for a long long time.

 

It's been 10+ years since I've worked with babies/toddlers but to me it depends very much on what sort of noises she was making before 9 months. Was she entirely silent? Was she making 'ba' or 'da' type single consonant sounds? Was she squealing/vocalising/making vowel sounds only? The type and quality of babble can be indicative of future progress anecdotally. I haven't remained up with the research on this age group but what I've noticed in my kids is that the kid who was slower to babble and when he did babble made only one consonant sound ('dadadada' as opposed to 'badagaga') was the child with the severe speech disorder (not language, he was talking, was just very unintelligible). So that can be something to think about too. Maybe some of the info that says babbling starts at 4 months are just referring to single sound babble as opposed to multiple sound babble?

Pointing and responding to name are two good signs for communication development. Is she waving?

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Minnie80

 

 

It's been 10+ years since I've worked with babies/toddlers but to me it depends very much on what sort of noises she was making before 9 months. Was she entirely silent? Was she making 'ba' or 'da' type single consonant sounds? Was she squealing/vocalising/making vowel sounds only? The type and quality of babble can be indicative of future progress anecdotally. I haven't remained up with the research on this age group but what I've noticed in my kids is that the kid who was slower to babble and when he did babble made only one consonant sound ('dadadada' as opposed to 'badagaga') was the child with the severe speech disorder (not language, he was talking, was just very unintelligible). So that can be something to think about too. Maybe some of the info that says babbling starts at 4 months are just referring to single sound babble as opposed to multiple sound babble?

Pointing and responding to name are two good signs for communication development. Is she waving?

 

Before 9 months, she was cooing a lot. So, lots of oohs and ahhs and squeals. But no letters or proper babbling.

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Chaotic Pogo

With family history, the best advice is 'if in doubt, check it out'.

 

With 2 older kids diagnosed with ASD, we had my youngest in front of a dev paed at 8 months old. He was officially diagnosed at 17 months. He then received a lot of early intervention and it has had enormous benefit.

 

This app should help you screen for risk of ASD. It's evidence based and by LaTrobe University, who are highly regarded for ASD research on a worldwide scale.

 

http://asdetect.org/

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I'mBeachedAs

With family history, the best advice is 'if in doubt, check it out'.

 

With 2 older kids diagnosed with ASD, we had my youngest in front of a dev paed at 8 months old. He was officially diagnosed at 17 months. He then received a lot of early intervention and it has had enormous benefit.

 

This app should help you screen for risk of ASD. It's evidence based and by LaTrobe University, who are highly regarded for ASD research on a worldwide scale.

 

http://asdetect.org/

 

Absolutely.. I totally agree. If your daughter has autism there's nothing you can do to prevent it. Early intervention, however, can be enormously helpful in supporting her and you. If I were you I'd book her in to see a developmental paediatrician. You'll probably wait a while to get in so things will probably become clearer either way by the time you're seen.

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Minnie80

With family history, the best advice is 'if in doubt, check it out'.

 

With 2 older kids diagnosed with ASD, we had my youngest in front of a dev paed at 8 months old. He was officially diagnosed at 17 months. He then received a lot of early intervention and it has had enormous benefit.

 

This app should help you screen for risk of ASD. It's evidence based and by LaTrobe University, who are highly regarded for ASD research on a worldwide scale.

 

http://asdetect.org/

 

Thank you for the link. I answered the questions and she was "low risk." I did something similar for my son around the same age and he was "high risk." I have to wait and see. Waiting sucks.

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Minnie80
Posted (edited)

So, my daughter is 14 months now, and doesn't say anything except "allo," when she is pretending to play on the phone. Thst's it. Nothing else. So, not feeling positive at all right now.

Edited by Minnie80

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Hummingbird82

Hey Minne, I can take relate. My nine year old son has moderate ASD and didn't say his first word until 2.5 with lots of speech therapy. My daughter is nearly two and barely babbled but didn't seem to have other flags for ASD like my son at that age.

 

I bought this DVD and I think it really helped her. It was made by two speech pathologists. https://www.amazon.com/Baby-Babble-Speech-Enhancing-Video/dp/B00HV414FS

 

While she watched that she started saying words and is now talking really well. I think it was the key for us. Good luck with everything xx

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PrincessPeach

So, my daughter is 14 months now, and doesn't say anything except "allo," when she is pretending to play on the phone. Thst's it. Nothing else. So, not feeling positive at all right now.

 

Still well within normal range as per this:

 

https://www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au/SPAweb/Resources_for_the_Public/Children_Communication_Milestones/SPAweb/Resources_for_the_Public/Communication_Milestones/Communication_Milestones.aspx?hkey=fb6753df-a757-4c4a-8100-aaebdd4451fd

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