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IamtheMumma

Delayed FYOS, any regrets?

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born.a.girl

It says...

Starting school at 6 or 5 turning 6 in the first half of the year.

 

I'd read that as being 6 already turning 7 that year vs 5 turning 6.

 

It may not be what she meant but that's how it reads.

 

That could mean six in late December several weeks before school starts, then seven at the end of the first school year. (ETA just read the op, and realise that if it's the same child, obviously they're going to be 7 in the first half, which could be two years older than some others.)

 

In Victoria, plenty of kids would be over six and a half by then - kids not held back who turned six in May, and those who were held back because they would otherwise have started at four.

 

My daughter was late November, so five and two months and she ended up being the youngest in her prep class.

 

So much depends on the state and the area.

 

She wasn't very mature, socially and it did have an effect.

 

If we lived in an area where kids were not routinely held back, she'd have been middle of the pack.

Edited by born.a.girl

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I'mBeachedAs

We chose not to delay entry for our son who at the time just had encopresis and was a bit immature. Now he has an ADHD diagnosis and is still having regular accidents at 7. If we'd held him back it would have been a wasted year as he's still experiencing the same issues. Only delay if there's an actual plan to do something differently in the second year of Kindy

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IamtheMumma

Thanks for the variety of opinions.

 

Childcare said they think the extra year will give him time to mature and he'll enjoy the programme. He's just young. He's supposed to start in 2 weeks time so this was a surprise. Last November they said he's ready to go.

 

DS has only just turned 5. He's not 6 until the last quarter of the year but would be turning 7 if delayed. Most likely the oldest in his class. He's teeny so wouldn't be towering over anyone. He has additional needs with medical and allied health input. Paed said to send him and let the school cope.

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born.a.girl

Thanks for the variety of opinions.

 

Childcare said they think the extra year will give him time to mature and he'll enjoy the programme. He's just young. He's supposed to start in 2 weeks time so this was a surprise. Last November they said he's ready to go.

 

DS has only just turned 5. He's not 6 until the last quarter of the year but would be turning 7 if delayed. Most likely the oldest in his class. He's teeny so wouldn't be towering over anyone. He has additional needs with medical and allied health input. Paed said to send him and let the school cope.

 

Ah, so not five turning six in the first half of the year?

 

I can't comment on what's appropriate for him, but in our area, that wouldn't have been all that uncommon. There were only a couple of children out of about 100 prep kids who hadn't yet turned five at the start of school, and there were plenty who were well and truly six and a a few months.

 

As I mentioned earlier, my late Nov kid was the youngest in her prep class, although there were smattering over the other three classes who were younger.

 

In other schools, in other states, that would have been highly unusual.

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Babetty

Has he done any orientation, transition program with the school? Bought uniforms? Getting excited? If he's looking forward to school I'd be worried changing plans at this late stage would knock his confidence.

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lazycritter

Is be cynical about your childcare's suggestion... Because childcare centres are usually about money making.

 

Sounds like they need to make up numbers (funding) for their new? program.

Edited by lazycritter
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Riotproof

Has he done any orientation, transition program with the school? Bought uniforms? Getting excited? If he's looking forward to school I'd be worried changing plans at this late stage would knock his confidence.

 

I agree with this. And I’d want to know what has changed between nov and now.

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lazycritter

Thanks for the variety of opinions.

 

Childcare said they think the extra year will give him time to mature and he'll enjoy the programme. He's just young. He's supposed to start in 2 weeks time so this was a surprise. Last November they said he's ready to go.

 

DS has only just turned 5. He's not 6 until the last quarter of the year but would be turning 7 if delayed. Most likely the oldest in his class. He's teeny so wouldn't be towering over anyone. He has additional needs with medical and allied health input. Paed said to send him and let the school cope.

 

Your son's age would be in the middle of all the kids in the schools I'm used to in our area.

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Expelliarmus

I’d go with the Paed over childcare.

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CrankyM

Thanks for the variety of opinions.

 

Childcare said they think the extra year will give him time to mature and he'll enjoy the programme. He's just young. He's supposed to start in 2 weeks time so this was a surprise. Last November they said he's ready to go.

 

DS has only just turned 5. He's not 6 until the last quarter of the year but would be turning 7 if delayed. Most likely the oldest in his class. He's teeny so wouldn't be towering over anyone. He has additional needs with medical and allied health input. Paed said to send him and let the school cope.

 

If it’s just child care saying this I’d send him. Another year isn’t necessarily going to improve maturity. I believe you’ve mentioned previously he has adhd? Kids with adhd can seem young for longer. So it is likely to be a factor for a longer time anyway. I don’t know, I’d be very upset to be honest having them state it now. Especially if he’s likely to have done transitions and be thinking he is going to school. It’s very very low to be making this decision and cynical me is wondering what other reasons they are recommending this.

 

For what it’s worth both my kids (1 severe Adhd and the other adhd, autistic and learning difficulties) actually did better in the structured environment of school. Actually if I’m honest the youngest improved over and above once he moved out of the play based programs of kindy and prep.l and into the more formal classroom set up. My oldest is similar aged (December baby so he turned 5, 2 months before starting school) and while sometimes he seems really young, he fits in fine with his cohort. My other child is one of the oldest in his cohort. Plenty of kids younger then him seem more mature.

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Expelliarmus

‘Maturity’ is a fairly ethereal concept anyway that doesn’t necessarily play out at school how you’d think. Sometimes an immature child has a sort of grown up streak in the worst area possible. Like brings dolls to school while banging on about boyfriends and girlfriends. Sometimes the kid who appears immature is just innocent and gullible so falls for some stuff while actually being quite cluey about maths. The one steeped in telling stories and imaginative play with FYOS children well into year 5 has exceptional English skills. The child with learning difficulties who can’t cope with growth and development has the strongest sustainability and environmental conscience in his cohort.

 

This concept of maturity is used by childcares to freak parents out IMO. Trust me, they ALLLLLLLL come with various levels of this ethereal quality called ‘maturity’ and it means nothing. Educators can adapt for it and help children develop. Virtually all FYOSers get tired. It’s not a good reason to delay either. Half of year 1s and 2s also get tired at school. It’s not a reason for delaying. It’s a childcare tactic for money.

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José

Its awfully late to be starting to discuss delaying his start now.

I think sometimes a delayed start is appropriate but in those circumstances its been thoroughly discussed and planned for.

In this instance, although you have given pretty limited info I think I'd be perusing the original plan- school.this year.

 

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Julie3Girls

My Dd2 is a December baby, started at just turned 5. I actually found it an ideal age to start school.

She was no where near the youngest (nsw), if she had started the following year at just turned 6 she would have been the oldest by a few months at least.

 

If they said he was ready in November, I’d be wondering what had changed their opinion. And I’d also be worried about keeping his interest in childcare for another whole year.

 

If he has done orientation/transition at the school, if there were any big concerns, the school would have said something to you.

 

I also wonder about the theory of being more “mature” after an additional year in the company of younger children, in a childcare environment. As opposed to a school environment, where he will be perfectly within the age bracket.

 

I’d go with your original plan to send him.

Edited by Julie3Girls
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Fluffy Potatoes

Ds1 has a July birthday and we sent him 5 turning 6 (nsw) though we could have sent him the yr prior. I didn’t think he emotionally or socially. He did 1 yr at preschool and hit the ground running and thrived in kindergarten.

 

We then moved to the NT and last yr was a complete shambles. The trend here is to send kids as soon as possible and the yr 1 component of his class (composite 1/2) was mostly kids 5 turning 6. The school is more play based and follows a co teaching model (40+ kids/2 teachers), no desks etc. He has been doing all group work etc with the year 2’s who seem to be more academically at his level. I am not interested in him skipping a grade. Ds has been miserable, bored and just stopped working and his teachers describe him as having an attitude problem and manipulative with his peers. The kid is 7! His class next year will also be a 1/2 composite.

 

We have spent the year vacillating between changing schools or not, I’m still not 100% sure. It will be his third school in as many years of schooling. While some of these issues would have been brought about by the move, I do feel that the school’s educational approach isn’t a good fit for ds and have enrolled him elsewhere.

 

That was a bit of a ramble, sorry! In answer to your question though, I don’t believe it to be a one size fits all. It depends on the kid, the school and the cohort.

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Percival

Its awfully late to be starting to discuss delaying his start now.

I think sometimes a delayed start is appropriate but in those circumstances its been thoroughly discussed and planned for.

In this instance, although you have given pretty limited info I think I'd be perusing the original plan- school.this year.

 

Absolutely this.

I am all for an additional year of preschool education where appropriate. It can be the difference between coping and thriving at school, however two weeks before school starts, is not the time for that discussion.

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PrincessPeach

Thanks for the variety of opinions.

 

Childcare said they think the extra year will give him time to mature and he'll enjoy the programme. He's just young. He's supposed to start in 2 weeks time so this was a surprise. Last November they said he's ready to go.

 

DS has only just turned 5. He's not 6 until the last quarter of the year but would be turning 7 if delayed. Most likely the oldest in his class. He's teeny so wouldn't be towering over anyone. He has additional needs with medical and allied health input. Paed said to send him and let the school cope.

 

I'd be pushing daycare for a decent explaination of why they want him to repeat. It's really unusual for a child born in the first half of the intake year to be held back in qld. At our school he would be the oldest by 6 months.

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born.a.girl

I'd be pushing daycare for a decent explaination of why they want him to repeat. It's really unusual for a child born in the first half of the intake year to be held back in qld. At our school he would be the oldest by 6 months.

 

 

He's only just turned five.

 

ETA: Where my daughter went, he would highly likely be the youngest in his class.

Edited by born.a.girl

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WaitForMe

I suspect I'll regret the $10k extra it will cost me in childcare fees...

 

Outside of that, she will only be a few months older than her big sister, who I had no choice in.

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WaitForMe

Thanks for the variety of opinions.

 

Childcare said they think the extra year will give him time to mature and he'll enjoy the programme. He's just young. He's supposed to start in 2 weeks time so this was a surprise. Last November they said he's ready to go.

 

DS has only just turned 5. He's not 6 until the last quarter of the year but would be turning 7 if delayed. Most likely the oldest in his class. He's teeny so wouldn't be towering over anyone. He has additional needs with medical and allied health input. Paed said to send him and let the school cope.

 

Sounds highly suspicious to me, like maybe they've realised their numbers are down this year.

 

When did they tell you this? Sounds really recent - are they even open atm?

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Bird1

Honestly if they can’t give you a reason I would be sending him,

In QLD we don’t hold back because of age. And it’s not like he will be the youngest far from it, a lot will be turning 5 in the first six months of the year

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born.a.girl

I agree it sounds suss with the short notice.

 

My daughter's main friend at 4yo kinder was a boy who qualified for a second year of kinder (Vic), and his mum was told from midway through the year that they didn't think he'd be ready for school.

 

 

I didn't know a lot at that stage about (what was then called) Asperger's, or Autism, but he was eventually diagnosed during prep.

 

It was only towards the end of the year when her second, just turning three, was able to easily (and eagerly) follow the kinder routine that she saw just how 'different' he was.

 

If he's genuinely 'not ready for school' (using accepted criteria) then surely that must have been obvious months ago.

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SplashingRainbows

He is 5. 5 is the age children are meant to start school across Australia.

Paed thinks he is ready to do.

 

Send him.

 

Schooling is wonderful for most kids.

In my opinion starting him at 5 turning 6 gives you far more options later if he needs them.

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gracie1978

How stressful of daycare to spring this on you now!

 

If he can't deal with school now, at a good age, then additional support may be required. Best to find that out earlier rather than later.

 

With all the information you've shared I would send him, also I'd go with your paed recommendation.

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Lime-Polka-Dot

I know that you're in QLD and I don't know what differences there are in the process, but In Victoria, to qualify for a second year of funded preschool children need to have delays in at least two areas. If the child is due to turn 6 during the second year of preschool the family has to apply to the education department for an exemption from school.

 

If a kindergarten teacher has concerns about the child's school readiness the discussions with families begin mid year - although that is such a long time before school starts and so much growth and development can take place in that time, it's the timeline we need to follow for second year applications, to ensure a place can be made available through the council and to implement a term 3 plan to focus on how we will specifically plan for that child in the second half of the year, as well as complete comprehensive documentation explaining exactly why a second year of preschool is recommended and specific intentional teaching strategies recommended for the child in the second year. We also have to sign declarations stating that we have genuine evidence and reason for the child requiring a second year of preschool.

 

It's a very fine balance between what will a second year of preschool actually achieve and benefit the child against how can this child be supported by the school and the benefits of other intervention programs if needed.

 

It can be too difficult to know, especially mid year but when I have these discussions with families I am reassuring them that a final decision does not have to be made 6 months before school starts, but if there are concerns then we should start the process now. Parents can have a second year secured and an enrollment at school and make an informed decision closer to the end of the year.

 

I have seen children who are held back with disastrous results- extreme behaviour issues that weren't present during the first year at preschool, boredom and an absolute readiness for further cognitive challenges than we are equipped to provide for them.

 

Others have had certain issues such as extreme separation anxiety- a second year of preschool did not help in the slightest. Or additional needs that honestly will not resolve or disappear with a second year of preschool.

 

I've also seen children who have absolutely thrived during a second year who then went on to school ready and will thrive in comparison to what they may have the year before.

 

I am concerned about the motivation of the long day care in mentioning this so suddenly when there was no concern last year? I am doubtful that there was a funded kindergarten program with a bachelor trained early childhood teacher making this recommendation to you? I have also been in the long day care industry long enough to know they do not always have the best interests of children as their priority unfortunately.

 

Did your son attend transition to school sessions? Was there any feedback from the school? We have absolutely had more than one local school in the area of our stand alone preschool contact us for advice about concerns and flat out tell parents if they think the child isn't suited to transition to school the following year.

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PrincessPeach

ignore my original comment.

 

Qld it's not normal for kids born more than 3 months before the cut off date to be held back.

 

It would be very unusual for a child here to turn 7 in their prep year.

Edited by PrincessPeach
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