Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Percival

I guess this belongs here

Recommended Posts

Percival

We have had concerns for our 7 year old son for a little while. His achievement at school seems wildly unpredictable. One day he is reading at an extremely high level and writing beautiful stories, the next he can barely put pen to paper. We have had many discussions with his very kind and dedicated grade one teacher. He unfortunately just comes across as a lazy kid :(. However, he hates letting people down, is incredibly thoughtful and kind and lack of effort didn't make sense. He has had a tough couple of years and has managed to cope but has anxiety.

We decided to have him assessed through Krongold Clinic and (I am still waiting on final report and recommendations) the pre report interview was very overwhelming. He has some areas where he is highly intelligent, particularly around problem solving and language, I feel bad as I can't really remember as I was so overwhelmed by it all. However he has much slower processing, still within the average range but on the cusp of low average. He also has difficulty around executive functions such as starting tasks.

Obviously the clinic will help us navigate this, but I am wondering if anyone else has had a similar experience with very high intelligence but slower processing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ipsee

One of my kids has very slow processing speed and we get erratic results too. I don't totally understand it to be honest, except that when they are staring off looking vague, they are actually overwhelmed and can't process anything further, so miss the instructions etc.

 

I hope someone else has some useful info for you!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Prancer is coming

My kid has a verbal score in the gifted range and a working memory in the bottom 27%. His processing score was average. He had ADHD and a learning disability around his writing. My understanding is ADHD IQ tests often show lower memory and processing scores. My other child with average IQ had a low average working memory and was unable to get a processing score as his results were erratic. Verbal was high average.

 

Not to say your child has ADHD, and IQ scores certainly is not how you diagnose it. My child’s wide range of scores with deemed statistically significant and occurred in something like less than 5% of the population, indicating it was an issue. So frustrating when they are smart but don’t have the tools to deal with the info in their heads. Mine also was tested on some academic areas and was pretty average in basic reading and spelling (so stuff that needed memory and processing skill) yet came out really high on more academically advanced stuff like maths and comprehension.

 

you should get a report that breaks it down and makes recommendations. The educational psychologist thst did our tests said she has never come across a lazy kid, and there is generally a reason kids are acting in a way it is defined by others as lazy.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quay11

Yes I'm familiar to this too. My Year 2 kid was not doing any work at school and her teachers didn't think she was able too and that I had too high expectations. It didn't sound right to me because she was incredibly verbally precocious and was a very good reader.

 

First stop for me was an IQ test which showed her in the gifted range. My first thoughts are that she was bored so I tried some more extension activities outside of school with mixed results.

 

In Year 3 she started blinking which then moved to head nodding and a strange hand shake movement and sniffing. She has an underlying immune system issue so I got that side checked first and her opthalmologist found no new eye issues and she didn't show signs of asthma. Did a bit of googling and found she was ticking an awful lot of boxes for Tourette's Syndrome. After a couple of appointments with a Neurologist she had a confirmed diagnosis of Tourette's and then I also started looking at co-morbids and we've since added ADHD (she doesn't show hyperactivity but the executive functioning is way off) and then anxiety and OCD.

 

It's a process, but keep going :) every test you learn something! She is in Year 5 and still has ups and downs but she has really hooked into the academics more this year and is finally starting to show what she is capable of. Next concern will be high school and how that goes...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quay11

The educational psychologist thst did our tests said she has never come across a lazy kid, and there is generally a reason kids are acting in a way it is defined by others as lazy.

 

Oh gosh this is great! I wish there was a pathway for all "lazy kids" at school to get some basic screening done with a view to provide appropriate support.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hoohoobump

 

 

Oh gosh this is great! I wish there was a pathway for all "lazy kids" at school to get some basic screening done with a view to provide appropriate support.

 

Always makes me think of the ‘kids will do well if they can’. They are usually trying really hard.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Prancer is coming
1576795816[/url]' post='18531646']

Oh gosh this is great! I wish there was a pathway for all "lazy kids" at school to get some basic screening done with a view to provide appropriate support.

 

Wouldn’t this be great.

 

Also, I assumed teachers would be experts in picking up any issues students may have. I was wrong. I think if any kid presents with pretty typical symptoms and extreme behaviour, they will be identified, but the rest will only be if you get a fantastic teacher or trust your own gut and get testing done privately.

 

Also, there is usually a heap of information on gifted students on the state education website. Any psych report usually calls scores in the top 2% gifted. However, the education department’s definition is generally the top 10%, or even 15%. A score on the cusp of low average will most likely drag the full scale iq down, though how much depends on what the scores were on the other items. So if your child’s full scale IQ is not in the top 2%, don’t assume they cannot access a gifted program at school.

Edited by Prancer is coming

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Steph116

I had my son assessed at the krongold centre when he was 4 (now almost 10). He has a very mixed profile, his IQ is extremely high but his processing speed is very low and his executive functioning is problematic. We have had good years and bad years with school, he is now quite behind in literacy but a long way ahead in maths. It's also very hard to get school work targeted at the right level for him, he has ADHD, so if it is too easy he gets bored and doesn't do it, if it is too hard he gets overwhelmed and doesn't do it, if it doesn't interest him he zones out and doesn't do it. I don't have any real advice except work with the teachers as much as possible so that they understand his strengths and weaknesses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Percival

OP here. Firstly, thank you to everyone who responded and apologies for taking so long to come back, I was feeling quite overwhelmed with the process.

Its so interesting to read that there are quite a few kids in the same boat. It's disappointing to read that most aren't being catered for. We ended up having a delay with the report but finally got it and have taken it down to the school. The teacher is lovely and says she is accommodating but I wonder if her understanding of the report is limited, I am a teacher and mine certainly is.

His strengths are

verbal comprehension index

basic reading composite

writing spelling

oral language expression

oral word fluency

all in high 90's

 

 

Math composite 88

Learning efficiency 89

 

 

His weaknesses were

Processing speed

Matrix reasoning (bringing his fluid reasoning score right down)

in the teen numbers

 

I honestly dont know what to do. Some of his scores put him in the top 1 and 2% of the population, yet he is isn't getting opportunities to explore and extend. its just disheartening and he is feeling rubbish about himself.

Any suggestions? I have looked at local schools and the only school I can see that might meet his needs is 25k a year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CallMeFeral

No advice but all sympathy. It's so hard. We recently had DS assessed and it's similar - low processing speed but did really well on untimed tasks. Meaning that he will always do badly on tests (because they are always timed) and then not be given challenging work because they don't know his skill level, and then he'll be even more distracted. It's almost built in to our assessment system that kids with slow processing speed will lose out :(

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Percival

No advice but all sympathy. It's so hard. We recently had DS assessed and it's similar - low processing speed but did really well on untimed tasks. Meaning that he will always do badly on tests (because they are always timed) and then not be given challenging work because they don't know his skill level, and then he'll be even more distracted. It's almost built in to our assessment system that kids with slow processing speed will lose out :(

This is exactly how I feel it just makes me want to cry. The more pressure he feels the worse he performs. I am seriously considering home schooling him but he just loves the social structure of school so much.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Percival

I feel like I should know, but I don't. What accommodations can I ask for in standardised assessments such as cold write, running records, math assessments etc.

He came close to meeting ADHD criteria, but didn't, however when he is anxious (such as test environment) he goes into flight mode and it might as well be in another language.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Behind Hazel Eyes

I don't know re school. In university accommodations I could get due to a physical disability were not having to take more than 1 exams a day, so if there were 2 scheduled I got to sit one separately in a special exam session. This was all I used but they also had things like being able to have breaks outside with an invigilator that didn't count toward my total time and I could have had a scribe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bethlehem Babe

Percival, firstly, you are doing fantastic things for your boy.

 

May I suggest getting some therapy such as ot if possible. They can often identify what specific changes need to be put in place in a class room or other space.

 

Some of the things we do

Assessments are not written, but typed.

Spoken presentations are supported with PowerPoint slides

We also use assistant technology such as an iPad with a speech app, printed schedules, timers, tilted writing surfaces, wobble cushions and stools, wobble boards etc.

 

Our ot and speechie really helped work out what works where and how.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Crombek

Has he had his eyes tested recently? My DS with a very similar profile had ‘fine’ vision in FYOS but when we tested again this year is long sighted, has a lazy eye & is likely colour blind. All these things also effect processing speed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Percival

Thank you so much for your responses. He has an appointment for April with an OT.

Crombek. He has! We went to a special optometrist as I couldn’t believe he was ok.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Prancer is coming
Posted (edited)

Did the report come with recommendations? My report was done by an educational psychologist employed at our school, so she was realistic in what needed to happen and can help implement them. Does your child need (or qualify) for an individual learning plan, or whatever they are called?

 

I am a big fan of the public school system and they have heaps of info on their website about gifted students and learning issues. Did you get an overall IQ score? In my state a result in the top 10% means you can access special programs for gifted students. My kid might not perform within the top 10% all the time but his IQ is in there, so I make sure the school give him access to the program. He is also meant to get extra time in tests, be marked in a way where his writing does not matter and have help with planning. Whilst the recommendations are not perfectly replicated in real life, things are pretty ok.

 

Are the discrepancies in his results statistically significant? Do they indicate something else is going on? I found the more I had my head around what was going on for my kid and what the school policies said, the easier it was to manage. I do nag the school about things s a fair bit, but it was what my DS needed and it has settled down now and things are pretty good.

 

Good luck, and give yourself some time to process it all.

Edited by Prancer is coming

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Percival

Did the report come with recommendations? My report was done by an educational psychologist employed at our school, so she was realistic in what needed to happen and can help implement them. Does your child need (or qualify) for an individual learning plan, or whatever they are called?

 

I am a big fan of the public school system and they have heaps of info on their website about gifted students and learning issues. Did you get an overall IQ score? In my state a result in the top 10% means you can access special programs for gifted students. My kid might not perform within the top 10% all the time but his IQ is in there, so I make sure the school give him access to the program. He is also meant to get extra time in tests, be marked in a way where his writing does not matter and have help with planning. Whilst the recommendations are not perfectly replicated in real life, things are pretty ok.

 

Are the discrepancies in his results statistically significant? Do they indicate something else is going on? I found the more I had my head around what was going on for my kid and what the school policies said, the easier it was to manage. I do nag the school about things s a fair bit, but it was what my DS needed and it has settled down now and things are pretty good.

 

Good luck, and give yourself some time to process it all.

 

His iq score was 119 I think. She brushed over it and said it wasn't a useful score for him as the discrepancies are too large. The recommendations on the report specifically say extra time for tasks, counselling to assist with anxiety, starting with hardest work first, test results to only be marked on what he completes rather than the whole score and things like that. Unfortunately the psychologist finished at the clinic before we got our final report. I am going on Wednesday as my middle child is finishing her assessments, so I think I will ask about what further support can be offered. I'm not sure what you mean by statistically significant? She said his lower processing speed was impacting his ability to complete some tasks so for example his math problem solving score was much higher than his addition and subtraction fluency, she said this was due to the timed nature of the task.

He met criteria for ADHD but the behaviours were better explained by anxiety and processing speed.

I asked about autism and she said she didn't see behaviours that indicated he would be on the spectrum.

 

I feel like we are missing a piece of the puzzle but I don't know what!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
born.a.girl
Posted (edited)

Yep, our daughter's results covered a wide range, spatial skills hit the ceiling, auditory processing skills low normal.

 

A teacher at the school we moved her to, said it's much easier to actually teach a child with a lower IQ where every figure is much the same, than one with such discrepancies.

 

Despite the good IQ she ended up in remedial English and Maths classes by year five. My interview with the special ed teacher started with here saying 'you have a very bright daughter'. Um, so what's she doing in your class? Well, if she had her way she'd spend her time gazing out the window planning her next choreography, but I don't let her.

 

She also gave me reams of info on what was at that stage call ADD (inattentive). Talk about tick boxes.

 

 

ETA: Roll on more than a decade and she is on max medication for anxiety. I wish I'd know that was a huge contributor to her school years.

Edited by born.a.girl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...