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amdirel

Teen period woes

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JJ

20's are sill available without prescription.

 

50's are not.

 

Good to know, thanks!

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livelifelovehappy

I was always like this. I was finally, FINALLY diagnosed with endometriosis at 38! It needs to be taken seriously, it’s not normal to suffer so badly. I already had so much damage at my surgery and it prevented me becoming pregnant for 5 years.

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YodaTheWrinkledOne

I was always like this. I was finally, FINALLY diagnosed with endometriosis at 38! It needs to be taken seriously, it’s not normal to suffer so badly. I already had so much damage at my surgery and it prevented me becoming pregnant for 5 years.

The lag time for endometriosis diagnosis is often 5-15 years, depending on when women seek help from their GP/Gyno. Currently the 'gold-standard' for diagnosis is laparoscopic surgery, which many women put off because getting cut open to tell you that you officially have endometriosis is not particularly useful if nothing changes with your symptoms. Many women are only "officially" diagnosed when they are investigated for fertility issues. However, there is research now trying to figure out less invasive ways to diagnose endometriosis, which would be very useful.

 

Better education and awareness of endometriosis symptoms means that women will be likely seek help earlier and receive treatment earlier.

 

Most women feel some discomfort for the first 24-48 hours of their period but they can manage it with panadol and a bit of TLC (heat packs, a bit more rest, gentle exercise, etc). For many women, the heaviest bleeding is also in the first 24-48 hours but it settles down a lot after that.

 

But if you are suffering from extreme period symptoms (severe fluid loss, debilitating pain/cramps that wipe you out for several days, extremely long periods that last a week or more), then women should be encouraged to see a doctor for further investigation. And if the first doctor brushes you off indicating that you should simply "suck it up", seek a second opinion.

 

If your periods are seriously impacting your ability to participate in your life the way you normally would, see your GP.

 

However, keep in mind that for young girls, it can take a couple of years before their periods settle into a 'reasonable pattern'. Hence why it is important for girls to track what's happening.

Edited by YodaTheWrinkledOne
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amdirel
Posted (edited)

Ok so after 2 days in a row of DD flooding through a tampon AND pad AND modibodi's AND her clothing, all worn together (and at her new school!! 😳) she's finally ready to go to the doctor.

So should I just ask outright for a referral to a gynae? And decline if GP straight up suggests the pill etc?

Edit- and a GP phone appointment is alright, right? No examination?

Edited by amdirel

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rosie28

I’d be wanting to see a gynaecologist for that. Short term some tranexamic acid might be able to assist. Definitely decline the pill without further investigations. 

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rosie28

I’d think Telehealth would be ok for the GP. Perhaps not for the gynaecologist, they might want to do a scan and examination. 

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Sweet.Pea

I haven't read the whole thread, but I would see a gynecologist for that. I'd also request a blood test to check iron levels etc.

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amdirel
20 minutes ago, Sweet.Pea said:

I haven't read the whole thread, but I would see a gynecologist for that. I'd also request a blood test to check iron levels etc.

Thank you. That's a very good idea re iron. She gets hardly any iron in her diet too. 

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CrankyM
29 minutes ago, amdirel said:

Thank you. That's a very good idea re iron. She gets hardly any iron in her diet too. 

Low iron causes me to have heavier periods. Which means my iron levels drop worse, which then causes worse periods. It's an awful vicious cycle. It would be a very very good idea to have it tested.

Also, yeah, intermittent adeonmoysis doesn't help either. Definitively talk the to GP about a referral to a good gyno and not just "go on the pill" as an option. (Though the gyno might mention that as an option, because I was pretty much told only the mirena was likely to give me long term help).

You poor DD though. It feels awful to have that happen (been there at school with it too). Thank god our uniforms were black pants and black skirts.

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Chicken Pie
1 hour ago, rosie28 said:

I’d be wanting to see a gynaecologist for that. Short term some tranexamic acid might be able to assist. Definitely decline the pill without further investigations. 

this - do telehealth with GP for referral and script in interim for the tranexamic acid 

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