Jump to content
casper1675

Home ec/food technology teacher. How?

Recommended Posts

casper1675

How does one study to be a specialty teacher?

 

I currently work as a chef and I've been doing it for years but I'm almost 30 so I'm having a bit of a "what am i going to do with the rest of my life" moment.

I've been thinking about food technology in High schools or something. I don't feel like I have the knowledge or skills to teach baby chefs at tafe or anything but I do like to share my knowledge and love of "good food done right"

But how does one study to teach home ec.

I have no interest in being a "regular teacher" i doubt id be cut out for that. Would I have to start with a bachelor of education then go specialized or can I study specifically for it.

 

Any home ec teachers out there? Or any websites to search would be great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
José

im not sure what you mean by not wanting to be a 'regular teacher'

you would still have to attend whole staff meetings, do playground duties, probably supervise sport, at times possible take extra classes outside your special area etc etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Heather11

You could also look into the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden program.

 

Both the kitchen and garden coordinators at our school aren't teachers they are school support staff that had an interest in either cooking or gardening.

 

Of course because they are not qualified teachers the salary is not at teacher level.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
-Belinda-

Tafe teaching might be something to look into?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PrincessPeach

In qld, you would do a post grad degree in high school teaching & then put in for your posting as a home ec teacher.

 

Its not guaranteed as far as i am aware, unless you are looking at heading into the private school sector.

 

Edited for horrible spelling.

Edited by PrincessPeach
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Babetty

Perhaps have a look at the food tech curriculum - it would give you a feel for what you would be expected to teach - and if you're not out off by digesting curriculum material, maybe teaching is for you!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
onetrick

Tafe teaching isnt a bad suggestion, and a lot of schools offer students the opportunity to do a VET certificate by going to a tafe once a week. If you enjoy teaching school aged students you could then upskill?

To teach at a tafe I think you just need cert 4 training and assessment (not too onerous), and current industry experience (which you have!), so it would be fairly quick compared to a dip ed.

If you then wanted to work in a school, this will be an asset so not a waste of time. (I'm a teacher but I dont teach foods, so cant answer specific food questions- I know the newly qualified food teachers are more food science/ health than just cooking... well not just as I'm not a cook/ chef and envy those that can, but hopefully you know what I mean!!).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
casper1675

im not sure what you mean by not wanting to be a 'regular teacher'

you would still have to attend whole staff meetings, do playground duties, probably supervise sport, at times possible take extra classes outside your special area etc etc.

 

Mostly that I am awful at the basic things like Math, english and science (any math homework my DD11 brings home is helped by DH)

Im not sure that Im a good fit for a general teacher. The things that go along with being a teacher (yard duty, staff meetings ect.) Dont really bother me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EsmeLennox

Do you hold a degree in anything?

 

Teachers in this field are actually in demand in some places, so it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
casper1675

Do you hold a degree in anything?

 

Teachers in this field are actually in demand in some places, so it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

 

No degree in anything. I would definitely need to retrain for anything else

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kiwi Bicycle

Other areas chefs can move into-

Recipe and product development for food companies (for example jams, chutneys, cake mixes etc.

Food procurement buyer for ship/ luxury yacht companies that service visiting vessels or for hotels.

Teacher/ demostrator chef for adult cooking schools or companies showing products at trade fairs etc,

 

My BIL is a chef and works familiy unfriendly hours. Some of his colleagues have moved into these areas.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IamOzgirl

 

 

No degree in anything. I would definitely need to retrain for anything else

 

You need a university degree to be a teacher, if you have any degree there are easier pathways. If you don't you have to go to university to study teaching.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Burro

What state are you in?

 

Generally, Uni degree, followed by a masters followed by numeracy and literacy tests (LANTITE). If you do all of that, then you can specialise as a Food tech Teacher but the VCE curriculum has lots of theory, especially for older levels. You would have to be comfortable teaching about food security And nutrition for instance.

 

I would just train to teach at TAFE and see if you like it. You don’t have to be a master chef. Just learn and practice what the kids have to do, build rapport and have a degree of organisation.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
*Spikey*

If you like teaching, then food tech/patisserie/hospitality are subjects offered in the secondary school VET curriculum.

 

You will need:

  • your qualifications in Industry - eg, Cert III/IV in Hospitality,
  • a Cert IV in Training & Assessment, and
  • a Bachelors or Masters in Secondary Teaching.

It is very rewarding as a second career, but I may be biased, I teach VET in Business Services, along with other non-VET subjects. At our school, the foodies only teach food industry courses as there is quite a demand for those subjects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Grrrumbles

Could you volunteer first to check it is something you are interested in? Would need working with children clearance.

 

The specialist high school near me (students with a disability) has a cafe open to the public as part of their training program. Something like that might be a good option to get into the education system.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
seayork2002

I thought you needed a degree to be a primary or high school teacher?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
crankybee

I think you should approach a school and ask if you can come and shadow a food tech teacher to see what the job is really like. THat's what I did before retraining as a teacher.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LittleBrownMouse

I thought you needed a degree to be a primary or high school teacher?

 

You do.

 

Currently in NSW you are required to do a bachelors degree in subject area over 3 years, followed by a masters of teaching over 2 years.

 

If you have a prior qualification I think you can have that recognised and credited towards your degree.

Edited by MrsCee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
seemingly

Could you do private cooking classes or run workshops for kids? I know before and after school programs are often looking for extra-curricula activities especially during school holidays.

 

Hospitality as a subject is also heavily involved with business/commerce nowadays, so you will be teaching finance and reading/writing reports too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cimbom

Some schools offer VET courses in hospitality. Not sure if you need to have a teaching degree to teach this or if TAFE teaching qualifications are enough :shrug:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PrincessPeach

 

 

You do.

 

Currently in NSW you are required to do a bachelors degree in subject area over 3 years, followed by a masters of teaching over 2 years.

 

If you have a prior qualification I think you can have that recognised and credited towards your degree.

 

Same deal in Qld.

 

DH was considering retraining as a maths/science teacher.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chelara

What about working as a chef in a child care centre and possibly moving into early childhood qualifications?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FeralRebelWClaws
Some schools offer VET courses in hospitality. Not sure if you need to have a teaching degree to teach this or if TAFE teaching qualifications are enough :shrug:

 

You need both. There are some students who do subjects through TAFE and their teachers at TAFE may be teaching with a cert IV.

 

But in a school you must have a university qualification in teaching and there are quite onerous requirements for progressing through from graduate level teaching standard once you start teaching. If you teach a VET subject in a school you need the teaching degree AND a cert IV.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Daffy2016

I’ve seen some kids cooking schools go completely gangbusters recently. There’s one near us that does school holiday programs and parties, and they’re always packed. You’d probably need a fair bit of capital to start one, but maybe that might be a place to start working with kids?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...