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Threelittleducks

Trouble segmenting and writing words 5 years

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Threelittleducks

Hi there

 

DD aged 5 and in FYOS is having trouble segmenting and writing words. Her teacher reports difficulty with sounding out words and also putting random letters in the middle of words.

 

She is on her third set of grommets, so initially we thought it was a hearing issue, but her hearing has been addressed.

 

She is also incredibly head strong and resists having a go and practicing.

 

Where do we go for help with this? Speechie? OT? Educational Psych to assess for dyslexia?

 

And I know she is only 5, but if there is an issue we want to intervene early, before year 1 is well underway.

 

Thanks for your help

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CrankyM

They won’t test for dyslexia at 5.

 

There are lots of things you can do but the main thing is to make it fun. Make sure she has the foundation knowledge. So make sure has all the phonological parts and sounds down.

 

We used to practice using chalk on the cement. Write it in a sand tray or shaving cream. On a steamy shower door. Play find all the things starting with the sound **. All the things ending in **. Make silly rhymes. Make sure she can hear the sounds before writing it. Break words down into segments and use different colours for each sound to make rainbow words. Use magnetic letters or felt letters.

 

We’ve also used a speech therapist but much of the stuff above is what we have done at home (my oldest is dyslexic).

Edited by mayahlb
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Threelittleducks

Thanks for the suggestions. We do some of this, but you have some great ideas for other fun things to do.

 

At what age do they test for dyslexia?

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PrincessPeach

If you are ok with the use of screen time, the app by useborne called Teach Monster has been surprisingly good for my own FYOS son - he has phonological processing issues (diagnosed by our speech therapist, who we have been with for the last 3 years). I started him right back at level 1, which is sounds of each letter, but i needed to make sure it was sinking in.

 

Other than that, speech therapist should be able to give you help. Shop around because they all deal with different things & be prepared for a long wait list if you have to go public.j

 

ETA: just saw your question, im sure our speechie said she'd look into dislexia testing closer to aged 7, but i could be wrong.

Edited by PrincessPeach
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PhillipaCrawford

I wonder if because of the hearing issues she has missed some developmental pre reading steps. DS had a lot of hearing issues before primary and up to about 10. Despite genius IQ his spelling was incredibly poor, always confusing f,v and th. I figure it was because these were misheard at a significant stage.

I would read and read (as well as mayahibs excellent suggestions).

Play guessing games while you read stories, nursery rhymes are brilliant. I think she needs to really hear language before writing it.

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Moukmouk

We did a full educational psych assessment at 5 (end of FYOS) which was invaluable. Really showed strengths and weaknesses, and although you can’t get a “dyslexia” diagnosis at that age we got a working memory problem and specific learning disorder diagnosis which was so helpful dealing with school. The best support was weekly one on one speech therapy focussing on phonics, letters, sounds and reading. He also did minilit at school, small group support and then multilit. And OT. At the end of FYOS he didn’t know his letters. In year three naplan he got a band six in reading (still only a band three in spelling!). The best advice I have got from EB over the years is “if in doubt, check it out”. DS is the poster child at school for the effectiveness of targeted high quality intervention and therapy. He still has his challenges, but it is so much better with early therapy.

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Dianalynch

We found reading eggs to be a very good program for early phonics - if you're okay with screens.

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Jenflea

Has she had her sight checked?

A proper optometrist check will look to see her eyes are tracking properly which she needs for reading and writing.

The school eye test in FYOS or at the 4yr old check up isn't as comprehensive.

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Threelittleducks

Thanks everyone for the suggestions.

 

Yes sight and hearing both checked this year.

 

We already do Reading Eggs.

 

I will start playing some more games, great suggestions, thank you.

 

 

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.Jerry.

At 5 I wouldn't worry too much.

 

Your best bet if the child isn't "hearing" the sounds in words is a Speech Language Assessment. Would be worth it.

 

Definitely won't diagnose Dyslexia until about 8.

However there could be some auditory processing difficulties which a Speechie can help with.

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rosieann

I would recommend speech pathologist assessment and evidence based 'synthetic phonics' program at this stage. Have a look at something like 'Nessy'. Reading eggs may not be as helpful and is not recommended for kids with dyslexia. To diagnose a learning difference you generally need to have had at least 6 months intervention first.

Don't wait if you have concerns. Many of us have taken that advice.....harder to catch up the older they get.

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Moukmouk

I would recommend speech pathologist assessment and evidence based 'synthetic phonics' program at this stage. Have a look at something like 'Nessy'. Reading eggs may not be as helpful and is not recommended for kids with dyslexia. To diagnose a learning difference you generally need to have had at least 6 months intervention first.

Don't wait if you have concerns. Many of us have taken that advice.....harder to catch up the older they get.

 

I agree. Neither of my kids had any luck with reading eggs. It just didn’t teach the way they needed to learn. DS also was completely incapable of learning sight words. It didn’t matter how much chalk we used, he just couldn’t remember them. Once he had a thorough grasp of photos, then he could learn sight words. Fascinating how some kids brains work.

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Threelittleducks

At 5 I wouldn't worry too much.

 

Your best bet if the child isn't "hearing" the sounds in words is a Speech Language Assessment. Would be worth it.

 

Definitely won't diagnose Dyslexia until about 8.

However there could be some auditory processing difficulties which a Speechie can help with.

 

 

Thanks Jerry. I think she isn't hearing the sounds in words, but her hearing has been tested post grommets and is fine.

 

I understand she is one of he youngest in the class, but will be in year 1 next year and we don't want her left behind. Other than this, she is socially mature and ahead with numeracy.

 

She will often do things like sound out the word "stop" but leave out the t. Or mix the t and o up. She will also insert random letters in words when writing. She also lacks confidence on reading and is worried about getting things wrong, despite having the most gentle and lovely teacher. Her sight words are fine. It's just sounding out words, blending and then writing.

 

What does a speech language assessment test? And can any speechie do it?

 

Thanks

 

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CrankyM

Speech assessments can look at those things. Our bog standard speech therapist has previously worked on auditory processing, segmenting words, phonological knowledge and inferential comprehension (reading subtext).

 

Sights words are completely different to being about to sound out a word. That relies on memory whereas sounding out relies on using decoding ability and previously learned knowledge. If she doesn’t know the phonological sounds then breaking down a word is hard.

 

Nessy is also hands down hugely better then reading eggs. It works on spelling and reading and it considerably more adapted to a child’s ability (it’s about $15/month).

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Threelittleducks

Thank you. She does know all of her single phonological sounds quite well. The issue is with segmenting words and blending sounds and also decoding what she hears.

 

I will look at Messy, thanks.

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CrankyM

You could also try the reading doctor apps. We found them brilliant especially with blending and segmenting. They are expensive though ($25/app). If you do I try these I would only go with the Blending sounds 1 and Wordbuilder. They were designed with a speech therapist.

 

http://www.readingdoctor.com.au/blending-sounds-1-pro

 

http://www.readingdoctor.com.au/word-builder

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Threelittleducks

Thanks mayahlb. We've downloaded the Reading Doctor app you've suggested and I think it's a good fit for what we need right now, to help with segmenting words and learning how to hear every sound in the word.

 

I had no idea it existed, so really appreciate the suggestion.

 

Cheers

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