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DaLittleEd

Thanks for the advice Kadoodle and Cranky.

I will ask for psych support to help the teacher work with DD (the school does have a psych). They are actually setting up an arrangement with the Autism Association to have an advisor in school 1 day/week, and therapists, so we might be able to get social skills help through them too.

I  particularly like the idea with the red card. I will talk to the support officer and teacher  about that.

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CrankyM
1 minute ago, DaLittleEd said:

I  particularly like the idea with the red card. I will talk to the support officer and teacher  about that.

We've done programs before when red is seen as the state of distress so it was a common denominator. It's used in programs like the Alert program and most emotional regulation programs. Our school has a number of autistic children and other children with diagnoses and support needs so some of these strategies are already known (That doesn't necessarily mean they have been any better at supporting kids though!). The Autism advisor program is good, we had one come up when DS was in grade 1 and it helped a lot. It sounds bad, but I've found that if you are get the teachers and education staff to access the "specialists" that are in-house, you get a better response. Hence, why I mentioned the school psych rather then your own if you have one involved. (Nooooo, I'm not cynical at all :rolleyes: )

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DaLittleEd

Thanks Cranky. I am more than happy for the teacher to access internal support, the school has been really good so far, they have a dedicated learning support team.

I guess the diagnosis is so new that I am still finding my feet. I do think the teacher needs some support, she always tells DD when we discuss these things "try and make sure you let us know straight away when something happens" - we are working on it, but I think it will be a loooong time before DD IS capable of that, so the red card is a great idea. I also noticed that when we were talking about it with the teacher, DD was obviously not making eye contact (she is particularly bad with it when stressed), and the teacher kept saying "look at me please" - not going to happen! With DD when we are talking to her and need to see her face to monitor reaction we always say something like "point your head towards me, but you don't have to look at me".

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CrankyM

DaLittleEd, there are some good resources out there regarding things like eye contact (My kid hates eye contact and all his teacher know to not request it at all, especially after the memorable explosion of a screaming kid going "my eyes can't hear, stop asking for it!" before absconding to the office ladies where he got given chewing gum and allowed to hide in the sick room with the lights off.) I can't find it now, (of course), but I shared some resources around things like how to ask for my child to pay attention without requesting eye contact unless they specifically had to watch something like a visual presentation. TARA might have some good resources or info to share. The same with non-verbal communication tools that can be used within the classroom.

(If I'm being annoying just let me know, I not great at reading when to stop a conversation/thread etc.)

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DaLittleEd

Thanks Cranky, I will look for some resources.

And you are not being annoying. The more info and ideas I get atm the better.

My heart just breaks for my little kid, she is delightful, but has so many challenges. None of them major thankfully, but so many little things, medical and otherwise,  we are at appointments basically every week.

On that point, I understand that I can apply for carers allowance. I started the application, then saw the form the Dr has to fill in. I am just hoping that they can do the form without DD in the room. I don't want her to hear discussions about all the things she can't do. I  have to say, I was very impressed with the CDS, they don't like to discuss the outcome of the assessment in front of the kids so DD got to sit in an adjacent room, with a one way mirror so she could see us, supervised by a speech therapists while they told us the outcome.

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CrankyM
Posted (edited)

Dalittleed - we had T sit in the waiting room. He happily built a city of lego while the form was filled out. Our current pead is really good with him and talks to him about things like reports and explains things about assessments etc. But he's almost 12 now. Poor kid has been carted to sooo many appointments since being a toddler between therapy and his brother's health issues when little. We've always tried to keep the deficit language away from him but slowly built up his understanding of what these things (like the depressing reports) are about. He's not really phased by it anymore. Actually he's excited about the trip to Perth next year even though he knows its for (another) assessment.

Edited by CrankyM

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José
3 hours ago, CrankyM said:

 It sounds bad, but I've found that if you are get the teachers and education staff to access the "specialists" that are in-house, you get a better response. Hence, why I mentioned the school psych rather then your own if you have one involved. 

That makes sense to me.  The in house specialists hopefully have a trusting relationship developed with the teachers.  And they will know the dynamics of that particular site and school and most likely be realistic about what can be implemented.  

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CrankyM

@José you’d think so except out area has been through 6 school psychs in 5 years and one psych services 4 public primary schools and is so totally snowed under that it takes months for that support. When I have a psych sitting in the wings who knows my child (school psych hadn’t even met my child at the last case conference) and is happy to help in whatever way possible, and won’t cost them a cent because I pay for any billing hours. (Well NDIS does). 

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Elsegundo

My 8yo ds is not.coping with the new school system of webex meetings every day and multiple things to juggle with lockdown 2.0. Last time we were sent tasks each week and worked through them step by step but now the kids are supposed to manage work themselves and just ask teacher if they need help. He hasn't asked a teacher a single question in 4 years so not likely to ask now. He sits under the table during webex as he hates all the faces but has to respond to something sometimes to confirm he is there (has sound and video off). We have 10x stress we had last time. Teacher told me I should just tell him being a student is his job and get to work.  Gee, who knew it was so easy? 🤔

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