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ERipley

Expulsion from school in zone?

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ERipley

I’m just wondering, can a primary school child be suspended or expelled from a state school they live in the zone for?

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Meepy

A primary school child can be suspended or expelled from any school they attend. However, suspension is not an action taken lightly and there are criteria that must be met prior to doing so. Expulsion is a rare event and occurs normally after a number of suspensions, unless there is a significant threat to safety. In Vic, a student who is 8 or younger can't be expelled without approval by the Secretary of the department.

https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/principals/spag/participation/Pages/expulsions.aspx

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Soontobegran

Yes they can.

 

We had several suspensions and one or two expulsions from the primary school I was involved with. The children were all local/zoned kids.

 

Expulsion is a last resort and not a favoured option but sometimes it is the only conclusion to make.

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kshy

Getting very hard to expel (high school Vic). Need to find another school that will take them and then usually you need to accept a student in return

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ERipley

Thanks everyone. I just need to know where I stand and what I can push for. There’s kid at my son’s school who has been bullying children for years, had tonnes of parent meetings. He’s violent and it’s really concerning.

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Expelliarmus

As a parent you will not be able to push for another child to be expelled. The part you have control or influence over is the measures taken to keep your child safe.

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ERipley

As a parent you will not be able to push for another child to be expelled. The part you have control or influence over is the measures taken to keep your child safe.

 

I understand that. I just want to be able to push for some kind of action. So if they were to say they talked to the parents (again) and that’s all they can do I can ask at what stage are they going to discuss suspension.

 

I would love to hear how this process usually evolves. If he comes good through one of the various interventions along the way that’s great, but if not what else can they do?

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WaitForMe

The action you push for, needs to be focused on what the school can do to keep your child safe.

 

The conversation will go nowhere if you ask how they are disciplining the bully, because they can't discuss it with you.

 

By focusing on your child you can hopefully get a better outcome, for example not allowing your child and the bully to be in situations that regularly result in bullying, or providing closer supervision. It depends on the bullying. Can you give some examples?

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ERipley

Besides saying horrible things it involves hitting, throwing things, pushing kids off play equipment, generally being intimidating. It’s an ongoing problem involving several children. Everyone up to the principal has been involved. The child has been told to stay out of the play area but he just goes back when the yard duty teacher is out of sight. What usually happens in these situations? I mean if the child has been told to stay away and they just ignore it and carry on injuring kids then what happens next? When I was a kid it was pretty straightforward.

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ERipley

The action you push for, needs to be focused on what the school can do to keep your child safe.

 

The conversation will go nowhere if you ask how they are disciplining the bully, because they can't discuss it with you.

 

By focusing on your child you can hopefully get a better outcome, for example not allowing your child and the bully to be in situations that regularly result in bullying, or providing closer supervision. It depends on the bullying. Can you give some examples?

 

I should add, this is an older child bullying FYOS kids. The only access he has to them is recess and lunch.

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rileys-mum

Then it is up to the school to keep the younger kids safe.

Suspension won’t help this kid resolve these problems

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Mooples

Expulsions (in Victoria, I don’t know about other states) are extremely rare and the behaviours you’ve described wouldn’t even come close to warranting expulsion or even suspension. The child needs to be out of the yard at playtime either in a designated area away from other children or walking with a yard duty teacher.

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Expelliarmus

If your child is being injured and you believe the school isn't keeping your son safe then involve the Education Department in your state by contacting the parent complaint section, outlining your concerns for your child and asking that they follow it up with the school.

 

There is no 'what usually happens' because each case is different.

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ERipley

Then it is up to the school to keep the younger kids safe.

Suspension won’t help this kid resolve these problems

 

It won’t but it will stop other children being hurt.

Edited by ERipley
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ERipley

Expulsions (in Victoria, I don’t know about other states) are extremely rare and the behaviours you’ve described wouldn’t even come close to warranting expulsion or even suspension. The child needs to be out of the yard at playtime either in a designated area away from other children or walking with a yard duty teacher.

 

It’s so interesting because I seem to remember children being suspended from schools when I was growing up. Never expelled but definitely suspended.

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~Jolly_F~

 

 

It won’t but it will stop other children being hurt.

 

At your school... the problem is just going to go to another school (which is maybe what you want), as the kid legally has to get an education!

 

You are unlikely to know the full situation, the school will though and maybe they are trying to accommodate this child and everyone else’s.

 

All you can do is work out how best to protect your child and teach him/her that.

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José

 

 

It won’t but it will stop other children being hurt.

 

temporarily.

 

im in agreement with others. focussing in your child and their wellbeing and safety is the way to go here.

and if you dont feel like the school is doing enough/ acting appropriately chat with the education department.

they will expect you to have tried to resolve your concerns with the school first.

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ERipley

 

 

At your school... the problem is just going to go to another school (which is maybe what you want), as the kid legally has to get an education!

 

You are unlikely to know the full situation, the school will though and maybe they are trying to accommodate this child and everyone else’s.

 

All you can do is work out how best to protect your child and teach him/her that.

 

I really feel for the kid. His mother is fairly unpleasant and I imagine that’s at least partly responsible for this behaviour. It would also explain why calling the parents in has no effect on his behaviour. As I said above, hopefully some other intervention will work.

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Bam1

Whether his mother is unpleasant or not all the parent meetings in the world isn’t going to help unless the school puts strategies in place at school. Talk to the school about what they are doing about keeping your child safe.

 

My DS has been suspended and to a certain extent it worked but it was at the end of a list of strategies that the school tried first.

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Sentient Puddle

A child at the school DD goes to was "encouraged to leave" in grade 2. From Prep the child had been violent almost daily and was often shadowed in the playground or taken to the office to spend lunchtimes. The violent behaviour also extended to the classrooms where heavy objects were thrown and a child was stabbed. In the end the school told the parents that they were not really equipped to handle him as they received no extra funding for him for an aide. The child moved schools - but not to a school anymore equipped to better manage his behaviour than DDs school. The Education Dept had been involved for a number of years and there were multiple complaints from parents to the Ed Dept about this child. It was a very sad situation all around. When shadowed in the classroom and in the playground the child's violent outbursts could be managed - but the school didn't or wouldn't provide the resources for this to occur.

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Riotproof

 

 

I understand that. I just want to be able to push for some kind of action. So if they were to say they talked to the parents (again) and that’s all they can do I can ask at what stage are they going to discuss suspension.

 

I would love to hear how this process usually evolves. If he comes good through one of the various interventions along the way that’s great, but if not what else can they do?

 

Yeah. Your involvement with the school only involves discussion of your child. If you feel that they have handled it ineffectively, then potentially you could move your own child from the school. Demanding someone else be expelled is not appropriate.

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ERipley

A child at the school DD goes to was "encouraged to leave" in grade 2. From Prep the child had been violent almost daily and was often shadowed in the playground or taken to the office to spend lunchtimes. The violent behaviour also extended to the classrooms where heavy objects were thrown and a child was stabbed. In the end the school told the parents that they were not really equipped to handle him as they received no extra funding for him for an aide. The child moved schools - but not to a school anymore equipped to better manage his behaviour than DDs school. The Education Dept had been involved for a number of years and there were multiple complaints from parents to the Ed Dept about this child. It was a very sad situation all around. When shadowed in the classroom and in the playground the child's violent outbursts could be managed - but the school didn't or wouldn't provide the resources for this to occur.

 

Wow, that is so sad. I wonder what’s going on in his life to make such a small child act that way. It must be so traumatic for the other children to be around too.

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Soontobegran

 

 

I really feel for the kid. His mother is fairly unpleasant and I imagine that’s at least partly responsible for this behaviour. It would also explain why calling the parents in has no effect on his behaviour. As I said above, hopefully some other intervention will work.

 

My grandson changed schools, he was the victim of serial abuse by one child.

The child was suspended for a day, it meant little but a day off to him.

Unless you have the school, the department, the law and the other parents involved little will ever change.

It was not this other child’s fault, he was 5.

Protecting your child from that child is all you can really do.

 

A child was expelled from my children’s school after stabbing the teacher’s hand with scissors, stealing her keys and taking her car from the car park. He was 10. Our troubles became someone else’s. His troubles have never ended. It was not his fault.

 

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baking101

I would suggest focusing your attention on the school creating a written plan for how they will ensure the student has no access to your child.

 

If the plan is to have the student to stay out of the play area your child uses and it's not being followed, the plan is not working and needs revision. The plan should include how they will prevent the student from encountering the child they are targeting and what will occur if that happens (you don't really need to know what this is but the school and student certainly should).

 

FTR, my guidance is based from working in behaviour management in schools but isn't necessarily reflective of any actual polices that may exist in your child's school. Just how I would approach (if things were at this stage and hadn't been effectively managed prior).

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Lallalla

A child at the school DD goes to was "encouraged to leave" in grade 2. From Prep the child had been violent almost daily and was often shadowed in the playground or taken to the office to spend lunchtimes. The violent behaviour also extended to the classrooms where heavy objects were thrown and a child was stabbed. In the end the school told the parents that they were not really equipped to handle him as they received no extra funding for him for an aide. The child moved schools - but not to a school anymore equipped to better manage his behaviour than DDs school. The Education Dept had been involved for a number of years and there were multiple complaints from parents to the Ed Dept about this child. It was a very sad situation all around. When shadowed in the classroom and in the playground the child's violent outbursts could be managed - but the school didn't or wouldn't provide the resources for this to occur.

 

Well if they weren’t getting funding to provide the resources for this kid then I don’t know how they could have provided them without taking away from other kids. I wonder if the kids parents refused to have them assessed or something?

 

There was a kid at my primary school (in the early 90s) who was violent and very hard to manage, and ended up very behind and his parents didn’t want a bar of it. His parents ended up moving him schools to avoid doing anything about it - he went to the private school my own parents taught at that is known for being good with kids who need a bit of extra help. It was our last year of primary school and he didn’t make it at that school to the high school. I sometimes wonder what happened to him

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