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Homework in Kindergarten

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ekbaby

My kids got homework in FYOS- home readers, sight words (a little keyring with the words on it, starting with just a few then adding to it), and I think later a "grid" type thing with some maths questions and asking them to do different things like play outside, help with a chore etc

 

We did the readers (allowed them to read any book from home if they wanted instead too, by year 1 or 2 they just read library books etc instead)

Never did the maths, spelling or grid

 

Every year in term 1 when I met their teacher I just politely said that we didn't plan on doing homework due to the limited evidence for it in younger years (DW is a teacher). I said we did read every night. And that our kids were not allowed screen time during the week so they were spending their arvos playing in the backyard, doing chores, experimenting etc... stuff thats good for their brain and body. I also asked if there was anything in particular they needed help with/were behind. Eg DS2 has poor fine motor skils and handwriting. So we were happy to help with that. None of the teachers (we've had 6 between 2 kids) have had a problem with that. Some of them said they don't agree with homework either but that some parents want it.

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BECZ

 

If revising sounds is so important (and I absolutely agree that it is) then why can’t it be done during school time? Avoiding the need for a parent (most likely the mother) to be home devoting time to this and making sure all children get equal advantages in learning?

 

It is done in school time, but you have to remember that kids are only at school for 6 hours a day and for things like sounds, sight words and readers, repetition is the key.

 

The cutting out letters etc. just sounds like a pain in the butt. In first year of school, my kids only got sight words and readers.

 

I would usually fit them in to routine like while I was cooking, while having a bath and if I’d forgotten to do sight words, I quite often got them to do them while I did their hair before school. DS started school knowing most of DD’s sight words as we regularly did them in the morning while I did her hair and he’d peer over her shoulder and sometimes say them with her. I had no idea that he knew so many. DD1 only had to say them each day and I had to tick or cross if she knew them each day where DS1, DD2 and DS2 all had to write the words once each school night, so 4 times a week. There were usually only 4 words, but occasionally up to 6, so not a long task.

 

Add to that a few readers and that was it.

 

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MuffinQueen

I totally agree with your first 2 paragraphs and the last one, but not being able to make a specific time of day because you are at work does NOT mean you are not involved in your childs learning.

 

I didn't mean that those particular parents who didn't stay for the scheduled 5-10 minute activities were the parents of the struggling children...I meant generally, those parents who weren't involved in supporting homework and where education wasn't a priority as well as the ones who blatantly didn't give a crap (and would tell you just that).

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liveworkplay

 

 

I didn't mean that those particular parents who didn't stay for the scheduled 5-10 minute activities were the parents of the struggling children...I meant generally, those parents who weren't involved in supporting homework and where education wasn't a priority as well as the ones who blatantly didn't give a crap (and would tell you just that).

 

Just because you don't support homework does not mean you don't value education. There are no peer reviewed research that clearly states that homework has any educational advantage in the primary years and plenty that show a well rounded childhood (outings, extra curricular activities, chores) does. You will be happy to know that my two high schoolers who never did homework in primary school are both high acheiving A students who have oodles time management skills. These are the busy kids you see on the side of the pool or track doing their homework in between activities because they choose to.

Edited by liveworkplay
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JomoMum

I was surprised how little time they have during the day to dedicate to maths and literacy. Between all the transitions, fruit breaks, added sports day (because physical activity), library visits, music, PH, and additional subjects if a religious based school, there is just not enough time in the day.

 

Sometimes, we need to acknowledge that as parents, we need to be involved and actively contribute to our children’s education.

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liveworkplay

I was surprised how little time they have during the day to dedicate to maths and literacy. Between all the transitions, fruit breaks, added sports day (because physical activity), library visits, music, PH, and additional subjects if a religious based school, there is just not enough time in the day.

 

Sometimes, we need to acknowledge that as parents, we need to be involved and actively contribute to our children’s education.

 

I am not sure if it is our states education act or the Australian Curriculum, but the minimum amount of time spent on each subject is prescribed. Church based schools generally have slightly longer days in order to fit in their RE programs.

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MadMarchMasterchef

I didn't mean that those particular parents who didn't stay for the scheduled 5-10 minute activities were the parents of the struggling children...I meant generally, those parents who weren't involved in supporting homework and where education wasn't a priority as well as the ones who blatantly didn't give a crap (and would tell you just that).

 

Apologies I misinterprepted. I liked your ideas about listening to reading while cooking or hanging washing out etc. We do that :p

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Expelliarmus

 

 

I am not sure if it is our states education act or the Australian Curriculum, but the minimum amount of time spent on each subject is prescribed. Church based schools generally have slightly longer days in order to fit in their RE programs.

It is a state by state policy. Amount of time spent on each subject is neither prescribed by the Australians curriculum nor legislated in Education Acts. South Australian policy is 300 minutes each of English and Mathematics and 90 minutes of Science F-2 and 120 minutes thereafter.

 

Transitions, fruit breaks, library visits, assemblies and sports days are developmentally necessary for managing learning as children have limited attention spans and experience cognitive fatigue after a length of time.

 

While I agree there is a crowded curriculum I also think many teachers and schools have lost the art of integration and treat the school as much more sectioned than it should be. Library is part of English lessons and literacy acquisition, sports and movement is a critical learning area and music, art and languages are vital parts of the curriculum.

 

It is not because schools ‘can’t fit curriculum in’ that parents should supplement literacy and numeracy at home. It’s just simply a fact that children need to practice what they learn, apply it in new contexts and consolidate the learning and they can’t do it in 6 hours a day. They need breaks, rests and other activities - and then to come back and revisit the learning and build neural pathways. And if parents participate in that the children will grow quicker than if the teacher alone is responsible for triggering the neural pathways essential to automaticity and further growth.

Edited by Expelliarmus
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IkeaAddict

DS had to do about 10 words (I'd read them out, he'd write them) and was expected to a reader every week night in kinder. That started at the start of term 2. If he was too tired or we had after school activities we didn't do it, though I did encourage the reading.

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MuffinQueen

In my experience, seeing what I saw at our old school, I think it's because the poor teachers are so busy trying to teach the students basic manners and how to act - things that should be taught at home.

 

Plus there is a whole lot more administration work the teachers have to do, rather than teach.

 

Back when I went to school there may have been one, maybe two disruptive children in a class. These days, there are so many more. This is what takes up the time.

 

Students used to be held back a grade if they weren't at a certain level academically or socially - now you can have a child in Year 6 who has been falling back from Year 1 and because there's no help or support (at home or at school) these poor kids are then going to high school not being able read or do basic math.

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Riotproof

Take your rose coloured glasses off, muffin queen.

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Expelliarmus

It’s not extra admin that I’m doing as a classroom teacher. Nor is it crazy more amounts of disruptive children.

 

What is different to ‘the good old days’ that there are more children with identified learning differences and difficulties in mainstream classes and greater expectations regarding differentiation without a corresponding increase in support for students without disabilities.

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CrankyM

Students used to be held back a grade if they weren't at a certain level academically or socially - now you can have a child in Year 6 who has been falling back from Year 1 and because there's no help or support (at home or at school) these poor kids are then going to high school not being able read or do basic math.

 

So my child should be held back, bullied because he's not academic and removed from social interaction with his peers because he hasn't kept up? You do know every child has a right to education and that research has demonstrated that not only does inclusive education benefit those "disruptive children" and "others" but the children in the class who are interacting with those children?

 

Frankly your post is horrid and judgmental and lacking in empathy.

 

BTW - my kid? He's only behind mostly in 1 subject area, English. Because he's dyslexic as well as being autistic and having ADHD. And he isn't the disruptive kid in the class, that goes to a number of "normal kids". You know what's made a difference really in the whole class? Actually getting adequate support in the way of a teacher's aide for 3 hours of teaching a day.

 

Adequate support and appropriate levels of resourcing is the key freaking thing in providing teachers to manage a class. All those things Gonski recommended. But our Governments don't fund because they don't give a crap.

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Moukmouk

 

 

Adequate support and appropriate levels of resourcing is the key freaking thing in providing teachers to manage a class. All those things Gonski recommended. But our Governments don't fund because they don't give a crap.

 

Yep, my kid was the one who just didn't learn like the others in kindy. No amount of me doing sight words and readers helped (and some parents, like Muffin Queen, assumed that because I worked full time was why he wasn't learning to read). But I had the knowledge, contacts, and quite frankly financial resources to get him assessed and have massive amounts of therapy. Yes I did the homework with him, but the therapists did the real work. In year three he has now caught up (actually his reading is three years ahead, writing is still awful). But what about all the kids who can't afford hundreds of dollars a week for extra therapy. Who can't pay the $800 for the assessment that gets the extra help at school. I know people who self-fund teachers aides. If that early intervention was adequately funded then may kids wouldn't get to year six not being able to read. But sure, let's blame parents.

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CrankyM

Yep mouk mouk. I happen to be in the privileged position where I can fund the weekly speech therapy, where I can get a tutor (well that IF i can find one), of being educated that I can deliver a home program to help my child make gains.

 

I've known others who aren't fortunate enough to have those resources. But we are lucky our school runs decent early intervention programs for literacy (and it actually continues to yr 6 for those kids like mine who need the support).

 

But then the state government chopped funding a few years ago and it was a choice between aide hours in the classroom or the literacy program...

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c.sanders

I would refuse

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Paddlepop

Students used to be held back a grade if they weren't at a certain level academically or socially - now you can have a child in Year 6 who has been falling back from Year 1 and because there's no help or support (at home or at school) these poor kids are then going to high school not being able read or do basic math.

 

Do you realise that you said that in your out-loud voice? It's so offensive and ignorant.

 

Research and experience has shown that holding children back rarely results in long term benefits and can actually be detrimental to them.

 

My child is in year 4. She's still mastering year 1 maths. She has plenty of support at both school and home. She's not a "poor kid" who should be pitied and her parents judged. She has disabilities and neurological conditions that make learning tricky for her. She's had $10 000s of allied health therapy, and has pharmaceutical help. She has teacher aide hours provided by her school to give her intensive learning support.

 

She's entitled to be in year 4 in a mainstream school. In fact it's her right that is protected under Australian legislation. So sod off with your judgmental attitude and ignorance.

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Future-self

I

 

Sometimes, we need to acknowledge that as parents, we need to be involved and actively contribute to our children’s education.

Of course - however there is not just one way to do that. These constant hand writing ignorant but smug posts about parents in the classroom and homework for its own sake being how you support your child are ridiculous. There’s the pearl clutching gang who believe that ‘being seen’ in the classroom means support ergo no presence =no support; and theres the homework for its own sake adds value crowd who are out of touch.

 

I may ditch the homework in FYOS because worksheets aren’t my kids thing. Like many (most?) 4 and 5 year olds I know he will consolidate learning better while in the shower writing in shaving foam or doing maths With me - chopping veggies for that nights dinner and counting and using magnetic numbers etc.

 

This is FYOS we’re talking about. 4 year olds. The school would do better holding sessions or sending parents some quick videos on how to integrate some learning in organic ways at home in a way that isn’t exhausting for the child and stressful for the parents. They can call it homework still in some emails - only for the dodos who just can’t cope with things that are different from “when they were in school”

 

 

 

Apologies I misinterprepted.

No, I really don’t think that you did...

Edited by Future-self
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