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ERipley

What do you pack for a FYOS child for lunch? Not sandwiches...

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Abernathy

Our kids have a "fruit snack" break at about 10 when they have to have fruit or vegetables but we have found that so long as you are not sending lollies or chocolate bars (or nuts) then the normal range of food is ok for lunch and play lunch. Chips and biscuits and muesli bars seem quite common.

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Nobodyelse

Give your kid chips, op. Don't worry about the tut tut crowd. We rotate corn chips, salt and vinegar and pretzels. I buy the bigger bags and put a handful in a container. They often come home and DS has them as his afternoon snack.

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marple

Are you sure you can't send a peanut butter sandwich? They have been fine at every school my kids have been to. Or were you told that they were definitely not allowed?

My son has a peanut butter sandwich every day at school ( the only relatively healthy sandwich he likes).

He is such a sensitive soul he sits on his own to eat and is he is worried!

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JomoMum

My kids like quesadillas, and they last pretty well if made in a batch on Sunday for lunches through the week.

 

Ooh. Do you have a recipe for these??

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MadMarchMasterchef

Its hard if your kids have aversions. DD wont eat tomato or vegemite as they hurt her mouth.

 

Some other options are boiled eggs (if you are allowed to have that, check first as it varies), hummus and crackers, muffins, baked scrolls (made with pastry, cheese, tomato capsicum etc) , yoghurt (ours are allowed to put it in the class fridge) , rolled up sliced ham or chicken, pieces of chicken, pieces of cheese with salad, carrot sticks, pop corn, pasta salad, bean salad, fruit in jelly and of course fresh fruit.

 

With muesli bars make sure they aren't made on a production line with nuts. I occasionally send them and nobody has frowned at me so far. I think they are just happy to see the kids well fed!

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Kiwi Bicycle

 

 

Not all schools eat in their classrooms. I'd never heard of it before EB. The children eat outside, underneath the buildings or on the grass within their given area. Surely the classrooms get grotty if the children eat inside? I know that the birds have a great time cleaning up the dropped food at DD's school after meal breaks. The only time they eat inside the classroom is in extreme weather eg really heavy rain, really super windy, very hot, or very cold.

 

The 3 schools I toured here in Melbourne all eat in classrooms. They said it was to stop food sharing, make sure they actually eat and not play, don't have to take bags or lunch stuff outside to get lost and so kids just didn't dump their lunch in the bin and say they eaten it. It's new to me too as in NZ we ate outside too, sometimes supervised in an area, with teachers making sure we binned the litter.

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zeldazonk

The 3 schools I toured here in Melbourne all eat in classrooms. They said it was to stop food sharing, make sure they actually eat and not play, don't have to take bags or lunch stuff outside to get lost and so kids just didn't dump their lunch in the bin and say they eaten it. It's new to me too as in NZ we ate outside too, sometimes supervised in an area, with teachers making sure we binned the litter.

 

We toured 6 public schools in Melbourne and all of them had the kids eating in their classrooms and supervised by their teachers to prevent sharing.

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ERipley

The nut policy at the school is that nuts are allowed but discouraged. If your child has nuts they need to go to the “nut club” to eat. I think that’s really a row of children to be stared at because their parents are so selfish and thoughtless. My son loves the sound of “nut club” though so who knows? I will try to go nut free until we get a feel for the place.

 

His old kindergartens have been shocking, no nuts, including pine nuts etc, no lentils, peas, coconut, pineapple, kiwi fruit, egg... I’ve forgotten about 10 more things but it was ludicrous!

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Silverstreak

My DS has sensory issues and will generally only eat chicken loaf sandwiches with margarine and a little mayonnaise for lunch. I also pack Savoy biscuits with butter and margarine for his snack.

 

It's worth asking the school what options to pack. At DS' school they don't have a canteen and you can send food to be heated in the microwave and sandwiches / wraps to be toasted in the sandwich press, so maybe check if those are options.

 

DS always has a hot breakfast (cereal with fruit and hot milk, (plus toast if he wants) and a cooked dinner, so I'm happy to send him with a sandwich, particularly as he's easily distracted at school and it can be hard enough getting him to sit down for main meals.

 

Other ideas: zucchini slice or egg sandwiches if allowed, (check their allergy policy), protein balls perhaps? Small tubs of yoghurt if they can feed themselves with a spoon, or muesli bars, if safe, carrot / celery / capsicum sticks if they will eat them (DS won't!)

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Silverstreak

Ooh. Do you have a recipe for these??

 

I think they're just tortillas with cheese and other fillings that are panfried or in the sandwich press? You could add minced beef with garlic, tomato, avocado, pesto, shaved ham or anything you like, really.

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mandelbrot

Ooh. Do you have a recipe for these??

 

Um... pre-made tortillas in a frying pan with grated cheese sandwiched in between, is that a recipe?

 

If I make them for DH and I, I'll put a little bit of chopped coriander, maybe a light smear of salsa on one tortilla, or add some shredded chicken or grilled capsicum, maybe spinach. The kids just get cheese and maybe a couple of slices of chorizo if I am feeling nice (I try to avoid processed meat).

Edited by mandala
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BBC

The quesadillas I make are a tortilla with tasty cheese and a sprinkling of Red kidney beans or white beans. Fold over and cook in a sandwich press until the cheese melts, but not so long that it oozes out. Cool on a wire rack and cut into 3 wedges when cold.

 

I would love to add other things, but DD is a fussy eater. She would not eat many of the things suggested here!

 

A couple of things she will eat not previously mentioned - plain rice, a little tub of beans or chick peas, tinned baby corn, pouch yoghurts.

 

Lots of kids have chips or little packs of biscuits. For recess, kids want to grab and go, so most don't want to fuss with pots of yoghurt or things that need to be eaten from a container.

 

In my class we usually eat lunch in the classroom, to ensure the children eat, reduce mishaps with food landing in the dirt, and entourage sitting down and conversing with each other. They do make some mess, but that's part of learning to clean up your own stuff. However, the teachers in the rooms next to me always go outside to keep the rooms cleaner.

 

I would echo what Jerry said and say not to pack too much food. There are always a few kids ( mostly first year of school) who spend almost all of lunchtime slowly ploughing through huge lunches and don't get time to play. Your child will let you know if they are hungry and want more food.

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Abernathy

I think that, although some schools do not support nut bans, parents of anaphylactic children would greatly appreciate peanut butter and other nuts not being brought to school during those years when eating can still be a full body experience (!!) for some kids. A 10 year old eating a peanut butter sandwich might not be a huge risk but a 5 or 6 year old who is likely to get as much of it in his/her hair, ears, nose and over his/her clothes, bag etc...etc..can be a significant risk for anaphylactic kids.

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Riotproof

Very very true as well.

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MrsLexiK

I used to send for Bush kinder day, sandwich with vegan cheese (my kid is dairy free) or cold snag sandwich. Plain salted popcorn, grapes, apple, carrot sticks, sometimes some ham or cabana pieces. Around Easter I sent hot cross buns.

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MrsLexiK

Our head of prep actually told us to send heaps of food as they get so hungry! But they said they break a few times for a munch and all kids eat lunch inside before play time for lunch.

 

I used to send for Bush kinder day, sandwich with vegan cheese (my kid is dairy free) or cold snag sandwich. Plain salted popcorn, grapes, apple, carrot sticks, sometimes some ham or cabana pieces. Around Easter I sent hot cross buns.

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Pooks_

Mini banana muffins an cruskits.

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BECZ

My kids are all changing schools, so I need to call tomorrow and find out if there are any restrictions as I forgot to ask and can't find anything online etc.

 

They eat both recess and lunch in the classroom and it's a public school, so I'm thinking that there may not be and restrictions, as you think she would have mentioned it.

 

Their previous school had both an egg and nut ban, but later allowed egg as it was on the new canteen menu and kids were ordering them. My kids love nuts and eggs and in reasonable amounts, they are a healthy option.

 

All classes at our old school ate lunch in the classroom, when DD1 started in 2012, but these days it seems to be just kindergarten. Another reason for this is so that they know that the kids actually have any food. When DS1 was in kindergarten a few of us mothers used to donate a bag of fruit each every few weeks as there were some kids who never had fruit for fruit break and rarely had anything for lunch either. Their poor teacher was struggling to keep up with it all.

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BECZ

 

 

We have a kid ANA to about 7 things, including peanuts and eggs. He was in grade two when DD started and no ban.

 

 

I don’t think it’s fair to assume parents who do send stuff are selfish though. Their kid may eat nothing else so given it’s discouraged not banned and there’s a nut club they assume it’s actually not that serious, they may not really understand ANA - I’ve never known anyone who was allergic to anything so the ANA kid in DDS kinder class was my first experience and EB has taught me a lot etc.

 

DS had a girl in his class who was ANA to so many things. It was easier to say what she could eat rather than not the poor thing. It was when they still ate lunch at their desks in the classroom and DS sat next to her. Needless to say i was ultra paranoid. Her mum was a bit the same when i asked her what to avoid. She just said as long as its not eggs, nuts or unprocessed seeds (like seeds on top of rolls) as the smell of these was enough to stir things up, not to worry as long as they don't share (which her daughter won't), just can he please make sure that he washes his hands and face really well after eating.

 

That second paragraph was me for a year or two when i was about 8/9. I didn't have allergies, but was put on food restrictions to try and control my ànger management. There were very few things that i could eat. My recess and lunch was peanut butter on cruskits every day. It was pretty much the only spread i could eat, oh i could have some of those Peck's (sp?)Pastes, but yuck. No sugar meant no jam or honey, not yeast, so no Vegemite, no dairy, no processed meats and no real bread, only horrible stuff!

Edited by BECZ

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Riotproof

Tomorrow, ds is having leftover chicken/capsicum from tonight’s tacos with some cucumber, cherry tomatoes, coriander. I’ll ask him if he wants a dollop of salsa on top tomorrow. For fruit break, green grapes. For recess, some sourdough pikelets I made at the weekend with jam, plus a lolly.

 

I probably wouldn’t send a lolly in FYOS, but i do it as a complete random thing for ds occasionally.

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Baily

Mine won’t eat sandwiches. Just have a small container of whatever was for dinner that night. Then fruit and and a treat.

 

BBC you probably saw my kid with Asian style dumplings .

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Riotproof

I should really try dumplings for ds. He’d love that.

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robhat

Our school doesn't ban nuts or anything really. I've taught my kids that it's best not to take peanut butter or nutella anyway, or any snacking nuts. Our school generally just makes sure kids with allergies don't sit near kids eating the food they are allergic to. They talk to the kids about this and make them all aware of who is allergic to what. My son came home one year saying the teacher was allergic to capsicum, so we didn't send that in. Another year my daughter said she didn't want to take things with berries as her friend was allergic and she couldn't sit with her friend if she had berries.

 

But obviously it's different in every school, so you'd best check. If my kids only ate peanut butter sandwiches I'd probably let them take it every now and then but only because I know there aren't any nut allergies in their classes (yep, I've checked. I ask every time we take in cakes etc for birthdays)

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IShallWearMidnight

We are Nut Aware, but I still don't send my kids with any. And same at my school so I'm careful with my museli bars as well.

 

We love cold friend rice, egg slice, DIY rolls ( send plain roll and ingredients and the kids build them).

I want to make sushi as I love it, but just don't get time.

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Riotproof

I think it’s such a kind thing for these children to be thinking of their friends safety.

 

Ds has a friend who won’t take cheese on rainy weather days because they will be inside and he doesn’t want to accidentally hurt him.

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