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ERipley

What do you pack for a FYOS child for lunch? Not sandwiches...

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ERipley

My son will only eat peanut butter on sandwiches so sandwiches are out. What else can I pack?

 

What kinds of things are frowned on now? I used to be given a sandwich, muesli bar, occasional popper and piece of fruit. Other kids got a packet of chips every day. I was so jealous of those kids. I’m guessing schools disapprove of that kind of thing these days?

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Living Type

I do wraps, rolls, sandwiches. My son really likes the sandwich thins which he calls “dotty bread”. Scrolls and homemade pizzas too

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Grrrumbles

Will he have a butter sandwich? DS mostly has vegemite but occassionally asks for plain butter. I often put a slice of cheese on top of the sandwich too.

 

Rice crackers, popcorn and pretzels are the modern day chip replacement.

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barrington

What does he eat for lunch apart from peanut butter sandwiches?

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FloralArrangement

I’ve made sausage rolls, feta triangles, cheese muffins and lettuce cups with salad items in and cubes of cheeese. I also buy English muffins, split in half and tomato sauce and cheese melted on them.

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Riotproof

Would he eat cheese and crackers?

Cold chicken drumstick or equivalent

Ploughmans lunch with chopped veg, bir of ham/cheese/hard boiled egg

Cold bean or pasta salad

Wraps instead of normal bread

 

Whatever you send, don’t send too much. They get very little time for eating. And make sure he can open everything himself. Whatever crunch and sip is should be easy to eat and tidy.

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robhat

Many schools will require that you send fruit for a special fruit snack called crunch and sip or fruito. Some schools don't do this, but it's a good idea to send fruit anyway. Just remember that it gets bounced around and sometimes hot so peaches are usually out! Pears often don't survive either! Bananas, apples, citrus and grapes tend to work best as long as you pack them well.

 

Other than that, schools are not as fussy as preschools and daycare centres, but you should consider that you are teaching your child life habits as well as providing for their nutritional needs, so if you can avoid the packets of chips, chocolates and sugary things, best to do so. I think most schools are 'no go' on chocolate, but overlook packets of chips.

 

My kids take a bit of salad stuff, carrot sticks, snow peas, capsicum sticks, cucumber sticks mainly. Something bready, might be a sandwich, a hot cross bun, a wrap... And morning tea is usually crackers, cheese, dried fruits, one nice biscuit or mini muffin, yogurt pouches. Plus the required piece of fruit.

 

Aim for stuff your child will eat that is as healthy as you can convince them to eat as well as able to open the packaging themselves. And don't feel guilty about the rest. It's actually pretty tough packing decent school lunches.

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Bearynice

If no sandwich will he eat a roll, cheese and bacon roll, wrap or those sandwich thins?

Saladas, clix crackers and cheese

 

To go along with that, a piece of fruit chopped up. A vegetable ( carrots, snow peas) or small salad if he will eat those

 

Then maybe some cold meat or a bit of yoghurt

 

Fyos is a bit tricky with working out what they will eat.

 

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Octopodes

DS has cheese and crackers for lunch. He's had veggie sticks in the past, rice/corn cakes, homemade pikelets.

 

He eats his sandwich at recess and a piece of fruit for crunch and sip.

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Elissa03

We're about to start FYOS as well and my kid's not big on sandwiches. This is what I've been thinking:

 

- zucchini slice

- veggie muffins (corn/peas/spinach and feta/pumpkin soup), maybe split and buttered or cut into quarters

- pancakes - corn and cheese

- carrot crackers with cream cheese dip

 

with 'sides' like carrots sticks (cut thin for quick and easy chewing), cucumber, cut fruit.

 

We've been doing lunchboxes for excursions over summer, just to test-drive the packed lunch thing and see what will or won't work; these have all been quite successful for us.

 

Our school said to pack a crunch and sip separate to lunch, that'll probably be mostly bananas and blueberries, since oranges are a bit messy and his fructose intolerance means limiting the apples/pears/grapes.

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Serenity Now

Have you tried the sandwich cutters that cut them into shapes (dinosaurs, trains, aeroplanes etc)? My daughter refused to eat sandwiches but would eat them if she was able to pick what shape she wanted to eat.

 

Other suggestions are scrolls, cheese and bacon rolls, savoury muffins, mini frittata or zucchini slice. There is a huge variation across what people pack for their children so pack what you know he will eat!

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PrincessPeach

Veggie muffins are a big hit with my non-sandwich eating kid.

 

I use a Julie Goodwin recipe & they turn out every time.

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just roses

I make up zucchini slice as mini muffins. I heat them up in the morning and then pop them in a food thermos, so they're still warm at lunch time. In summer, they're happy to have them cold.

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Lifesgood

Rice or corn wheels. Cubes of cheese. Mini-cucumbers. Carrot sticks. A boiled egg. Grape tomatoes. Muesli bar (nut-free). Cut fruit. Mini pack of crackers/popcorn. A sweet biscuit. Water bottle.

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Mooples

I teach fyos and at least 3/4 of the kids I’ve taught over the years still bring chips, biscuits, lollies, chocolates and other unhealthy snacks to school daily, I couldn’t care less as long as they are fed and full it’s not my place to dictact what they can and can’t have (allergies of other students excluded). Some of the kids lunch thermos’ out now keep the food super warm so things like pasta, rice dishes, cocktail franks, soup, meatballs, mini pizzas etc are all popular. Sushi, cheese and biscuits, scrolls and rolls, wraps, tuna and biscuits, muffins are other things I see a fair bit of.

 

We give our preps heaps of time to eat, they are just slow and get distracted talking to one another. Practise eating for a set time frame for the next few days to get him used to it. It doesn’t take them long to realise they only get eating time then it’s outside to play no more eating and they speed up.

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~Jolly_F~

This week my kids are having pasta salad, veggie sticks with avo dip, corn chips, choc slice and grapes!

 

Some will take it all and others will pick and choose what they prefer.

 

I ask them what they want for the week on Sunday and shop accordingly. Sometimes they want wraps and sandwiches, other times it’s sausage rolls and egg and bacon pies or scrolls. Certain leftovers are highly prized lunches here too - fried rice, pasta bake, enchiladas.

 

Just pack what your kid will eat. Ignore the b**chy parents who have nothing better to do with their time than comment on kids lunchboxes!!

Edited by ~J_F~
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BBC

If you get a mini thermos you can do pasta, fried rice and soupy type things on cold days. Even baked beans or tinned spaghetti. I also have seen kids with meatballs and asian style dumplings.

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Caribou

I was very anti sandwiches as a kid, my mum used to pack me Sao's with vegimite or cheese on them. it was a bit dry, so that was compensated with a 'wet' item, like apple or pears.

 

For my DD, She has wraps, homemade veggie or fruit muffins, cheese and crackers, or hummus and crackers. diced up tomatoes.

 

Remember, it doesn't need to fancy, it just needs to easy to pack.

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MandaMama

My DS starts Year 2 this year and sandwiches - even when he's specifically requested them AND what goes in them - have been very hit and miss and often end up uneaten.

 

Echoing some PPs suggestions, we have had the best luck with filling his sandwich box with a range of nibble items such as baby cucumber, carrot sticks, cherry/grape tomates (yellow and red), baby capsicum (or sliced up regular capsicum), rolled up slice of ham, pitted olives, gherkin, cheese, crackers etc. So this is his main lunch. We've always had to send a fruit snack for the morning.

Edited by MandaMama

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nup

I'm a slacker so whatever is in the fridge goes in. Usually a sandwich roll or wrap, beans and carrots, an apple, berries or mandarin dependent on season and cheese and crackers.

 

On the days I have no bread they take wraps or extra crackers. Am emergency stash of ham and cheese rolls in the freezer is a good back up.

 

If all he will eat is PB sangers then ask the teacher. You'll probably be able to send them. No nuts is more preschool and day care.

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MarciaB

My eldest initially wouldn't eat sandwiches - I would make "pasta salad" most days - just left over cold pasta, cherry tomatoes, chopped cucumber, cheese cubes or chopped ham or leftover chicken pieces - I did pack a fork but I think she ate with fingers most days. Otherwise Vita-weets with cheese, those cheese scrolls you get from bakery (I was too lazy to make them).

 

After 6 weeks or so she wanted sandwiches because "all the other kids do".

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Caribou

If all he will eat is PB sangers then ask the teacher. You'll probably be able to send them. No nuts is more preschool and day care.

 

I find that hard to believe, we have a no nuts or egg policy at primary school. Its pretty standard from what I've seen and spoken to around the area.

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Sancti-claws

It really does depend on the school and what allergies exist at the school.

 

Ours is nut-free, as there is an anaphylactic child in dd's class (actually sitting beside her this go around) so not even going to be tempted for breakfast.

 

What can be held in one hand and eaten? Some kids have lots of little snacks, my daughter gets a wrap, a snack and some fruit.

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Crazyone26989

 

 

I find that hard to believe, we have a no nuts or egg policy at primary school. Its pretty standard from what I've seen and spoken to around the area.

 

Whereas I've never worked at a school where nuts or eggs are banned school wide. A class with an anaphylactic student may request no nuts or eggs but that's it.

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Kiwi Bicycle

My FYOS hasn't given us any guidelines re food strangely. Preschool was a bit funny regarding popcorn, and said not to send it as it was a choking hazard. Then they served it up for a movie day!

You can ask the teacher. Most classes eat in their classrooms, so I assume as long as there are no nut allergies present it might be ok?

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