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Excercise Enthusia

Introverts - what is your career?

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Excercise Enthusia

As above!

Edited by Squisheee

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Veritas Vinum Arte

Finance/Accounting/Analyst of numbers.

 

Give me a great set of data and I make sense of it. Most often left alone to my own devices.

 

I started out doing Speech Pathology and could not stand child clients nor their parents. For the same reasons I will not retrain as a teacher despite my mother making such helpful comments a few times a year about how cousin X did it and I should too. No it would kill me.

 

I score like 99% on introvert scale on Myers Briggs, not slight introvert but extreme introvert.

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purplekitty

I was in healthcare as is the rest of my family of introverts.

 

The love of the job overcame the discomfort.

You learn to interact and function.

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Jenflea

SAHM.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But before that I worked in retail.

I didn't mind it because they were small shops with few staff that I had to interact with daily, and customers only spent a few minutes in the store and they were gone.

 

I don't mind short interactions, but Christmas and sales time was a killer for my emotional health, just far too many people and noise and then having to be social as well? Ugh.

 

OP, have you volunteered in a kindy class to see how you'd go? i find kids less draining (I volunteer in class, but it's one on one reading) than adults. Kids are open and honest and have no baggage or judgements.

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wilding

Childcare Educator.

It's something that I have naturally been drawn to my whole life. Mum once said, that's all you have ever wanted to do, ever since you were little you haven't strayed.

My other alternate was something to do with animals.

Edited by wilding
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Green Sage

I’m an engineer, sounds great for an introvert, but actually I have to deal with a lot of people at work and on the phone, so some days are very draining. But I do get a lot of time at my desk to balance it all. And I have lunch at my desk for some down time.

 

I’ve known teachers who are introverts. They seem to have their “school-personality” and their home personality. They work it out and have their ways of coping.

 

We all work it out I guess, you find your coping mechanisms. Just do what your passionate about.

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CrankyM

Academic librarian.

 

Love my job. I can hide in the workroom doing things like cataloging, acquisitions, writing up and creating online tutorials, uploading and auditing PDF's for copyright purposes (those readings uni students access? I make those available and confirm they are copyright compliant) and I can communicate alot of the time via email.

 

But I also have times where I am out in the main area interacting with students, helping people with a huge variety of questions, having arguments with the printers, etc. It's a really good balance for me.

 

But... it is a field that is hard to find a good paying job, and jobs can be as rare as hen's teeth. It's part of why I am diversifying by doing a Masters specializing in data management. I'm hoping to work with researchers and more other organisations that need someone who knows how to develop data management strategies and help maintain data integrity. The pay is also pretty average and depending on what part of the country you live in, crap even.

Edited by mayahlb
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CallMeFeral

It probably depends on what sort of introvert. Sometimes the phrase is used for people that prefer to be alone much of the time. Sometimes the phrase is used for people who are shy/socially anxious/get overwhelmed easily in certain situations, but who actually do crave connection, just not necessarily face to face and/or with people we don't know. I think a lot of us end up on online forums!

 

Anyway I'm the latter sort of introvert, and I was in budgeting/finance. It was good, and when I didn't want to interact I didn't have to. It was very forgiving of off days. But I also wanted to something more purposeful/meaningful, and am now starting out in psychology. I can't say yet whether it's a good personality fit - I really enjoy being with people because it's not a smalltalk type interaction, it's being with them in a meaningful way, with a purpose, and talking about important stuff. I like that, and I don't find it awful the way I find parties and social occasions. But I still get a bit anxious beforehand, and sometimes feel quite drained from interactions. And I can see it's not going to be very forgiving of off days. And yet it's wonderful too, so much better doing something that seems to make a difference, engaging with people meaningfully, etc. It's like there's more positive AND more negative.

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Kiki M

OP, I am a strong introvert. I did go into teaching and it did drain me. I lasted a year then got out, but for other reasons as well as not being temperamentally suited.

 

Previous to that, I was a librarian. But in a public library you have to work with the public. Not so great for an introvert!

 

I now develop and deliver training for a software company. The training delivery is a small part and is mostly done online. I get to work from home, which is perfect. I have a great team and I can set up meetings or chat with them if I need to. It really is the best job I've had in terms of being a match for the way I like to work, and it pays well to boot!

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coffy11

Finance/Accounting/Analyst of numbers.

 

Give me a great set of data and I make sense of it. Most often left alone to my own devices.

 

 

This is me. Love when I can just work on my own. Unfortunately at a senior level the role often includes managing people and I really dislike this part.

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needs to get out

I am also a strong introvert, and spent most of the past few years in a training role. The other advantage is that a lot of my pre-training work was with people interstate, so conducted over Skype or the phone. And we recently got into delivering training in virtual meeting rooms which was great too.

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CallMeFeral

This is me. Love when I can just work on my own. Unfortunately at a senior level the role often includes managing people and I really dislike this part.

 

Yeah this was where I hit the wall too. I had to delegate the stuff I loved and do the stuff I didn't like, if I wanted to move up!

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bearosauraus

Finance.

 

I don't need to talk to anyone. Just do my own thing and send reports to people

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Oriental lily

I am very very strong introvert ( I don’t think I have ever been lonely in my life !) and personally with me I am fine working with the public , small ch it chat , being polite is fine .

 

What I struggle is being a so called ‘team player’ . I don’t like all the nuanced interaction on a day to day basis of working with colleagues . I don’t like the power struggles. The cliques that normally arise , the feeling you need to actual give a sh*t about these people on a personal basis lol .

 

I hate not having a choice of being around these people . Most people I have worked with over the years have been great , still prefer not to interact with them and that interactions I find draining .

 

Right now running our own small business with just me and DH suits me fine . I will need to find work elsewhere soon ( to get in a better financial position ) and am dreading it .

 

I don’t do ‘people’ well .

Edited by Oriental lily

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Jaffacakes

Medical research/administrator

 

The research aspect is fine - give me a bunch of numbers/results and I'll potter my way through them and make sense of them. Lots of reading and learning to do also.

 

The administrator side is taxing sometimes - I have to talk to researchers and explain why they can/cannot do certain things, plus I research is all about collaborations and connections so I really need to push myself more to network more effectively. Only do this role part-time so I'm fortunate I can retreat to my office/cave a few days a week to recover.

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Team Awesome

My 8yo DDs teacher is an introvert she said talking to the parents is the hard part during my last parent/teacher when we had finished talking about DD and were discussing her reading levels as she reads thick chapter books because they were all happily sitting and reading. We then talked about how I do growth mindset with them and discuss different school topics from how I interact with them about their school subjects, how we do birthdays and Christmas. She stared at me and asked “why aren’t you a teacher?” When I said that’s way too much for my (97%) introvert self she asked “why don’t you homeschool them?” and I said “same reason, though it’s possible in the future we might as we plan to travel”. Lol. She then suggested I start a parenting blog/vlog because she likes how I parent and teach my children.

 

I cannot deal with people anymore my last job sounded good working from home but turned into 300 incoming calls a day each person more entitled tha the last me trying to be an extrovert and sound happy all day long without popping a BEX equivalent and it led to a mental breakdown so am looking at different options myself at the moment. I’d happily hide out in an archive or filing room all day long.

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Wahwah

I'm not a classic introvert - more an ambivert. I have the perfect job for me. Self-employed consultant. I get to work at home 80% of the time and the other 20% I'm running client workshops. I prefer working by myself, but I don't get overwhelmed with being in front of a room full of people because I know there's a time limit to it.

 

It's more that I am not really a team player. I left work because I couldn't stand the office politics and all the damn useless meetings where people just crap on without achieving anything.

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Excercise Enthusia

Kindergarten teacher, but I work part time now I'm a parent. (I was ok full time before I had a kid.)

 

ETA... It's not working for me today!

 

Hi Mmmcheese,

 

I originally wanted to be a Primary Teacher but after having my own child am now thinking of Kindergarten. I love the ideal of developing personalities, teaching children how to live & interact peacefully in society, and so on (as well as numeracy & literacy).

Are these ideals realistic?

I love being at home in the house...sometimes even talking to cashier's at the grocers is a pain! Do you think someone like myself could cope with the energy level and entertainment needed by Kindergarteners?

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JomoMum

I run my own small business from home making children’s craft products. Make them in our garage and pack them in the study. It’s so peaceful! Most of my customers order through FB and pick up from my house, or order online and I ship to them.

 

I do 1-2 markets a month. Like a pp mentioned above, I can handle short periods in an environment like that when I know it’s short lived. But I do come straight home and need to just be alone for a while.

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Mel1609

Another introvert here, and personally the thought of teaching gives me nightmares! But if you're keen OP why not do a 12 month course as a classroom assistant?

 

If you're wanting something with no interaction, why not train as a typist? My DH is a barrister in Vic and he dictates all his work, then sends it electronically to a woman in NSW to type up. She does work for various people, sets her own rates and hours, it's very flexible. And it's a growing industry as more small businesses don't want to employ people full time. Plus she lives remotely... doesn't matter where you are!

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jewel2

Being a teacher and introvert is possible. I know someone who is a primary teacher and introvert. They have been teaching over 20 years and love the job. They have found it easier being with kids than adults.

 

So you may be fine

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Jane Jetson

Journalism. Didn't think that through, did I :laugh:

 

I don't enjoy the making-contacts, chatting-to-contacts bit, even when it's people I like. I do enjoy the holing up to write, later. That's where it's all at.

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FuzzyChocolateToes

Healthcare. I didn't think it through obviously. :) But I manage.

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Elizabethandfriend

My parents were both introverts and successful teachers.

 

I am a lawyer. I have to interact heavily for periods of time but then can schedule a few hours in my office quietly drafting documents. The balance is ok for me.

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Jennifaraway

I'm an editor in a niche of a niche of the media industry. I work from home part-time (daycare and school stuff just doesn't work with the office 1.5 hours away - I'm in Sydney). Mostly just doing my own thing, and almost all my contact is by email. I do miss a bit of the office banter, but I'm so blind to office politics I think a lot of it went over my head :D

 

I did consider being a librarian but then I realised it's mostly customer service (especially in public libraries and in entry-level roles) and I already disliked working in retail; plus, really competitive to find a job.

 

It's also really hard to find any jobs in editing - many are outsourced (so freelance), while many have just been done away with I think. A lot of "editor" roles are more organisation, thinking up topics, writing, and lots of people contact or management - not a lot of what I'd think of as editing (working with text). Not really for me... I kind of fell into my role and got to make it up as I went along, which isn't something you can plan for.

 

I think I've seen about three jobs in 10 years I'd consider applying for if I wanted to move, but I'm on a good wicket here so no chance at the moment (relatively good pay for the media industry, part-time from home, have worked with the boss for nearly 15 years).

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