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Getting a phrase wrong

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Guest EBmel

My sister's boyfriend has apparently taken to calling underpants 'pantalooms'.

 

(Obviously going for pantaloons but I don't know why he's even saying that!)

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Beanette

Not really a phrase, but I have seen many people in comment sections finding things "discusting" instead of disgusting.

 

ETA: And when people use "should of" instead of "should have"

Edited by Beanette
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No girls here

"Lucked out". I've seen it used to mean they've been fortunate, as well as unfortunate. To the point I get myself confused as to which is the correct usage.

 

Aust and UK: unfortunate

 

US: fortunate

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wombats

I know someone who uses loverly (in emails etc) when they mean lovely. I can't bring myself to point it out but do occasionally try to describe something as lovely hoping she'll notice....

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eponee

More a spelling than pronunciation - tow the line instead of toe the line. I go with the latter - but I can see how people might get the former from it (ie. towing a line behind a boat). Can anyone confirm which it actually is?

 

toe

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Zeppelina

Ooh, just thought of one my DH used to use:

 

'Battering your eyelashes.'

 

I had to point out that unless he's frying them in a pan and serving them for dinner, he probably meant 'batting' eyelashes.

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Cimbom

After I thanked DH for taking me out for a lovely meal, he said, "it's my pleasure, you're totally worthless (priceless) to me"

 

This was in Family Guy too :lol:

 

I hate when people write "could of" instead of "could have"

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Jane Jetson

I've seen a few references recently to "working at the cold face".

 

News.com.au is shocking when it comes to spelling and grammar errors.

I read a health article the other day in which "glutes" were repeatedly referred to as "flutes" and used heals instead of heels.

 

 

This is why news outlets need well-educated, well-paid sub-editors. Just sayin'.

 

 

I know someone who uses loverly (in emails etc) when they mean lovely.

 

Is her name Eliza Doolittle?

Edited by Jane Jetson
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jessiesgirl

After I thanked DH for taking me out for a lovely meal, he said, "it's my pleasure, you're totally worthless (priceless) to me"

 

What a romantic!

 

A bloke told my best friend that she looked "ravenous" one night to which she says she replied "no I have had dinner thank you".

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Peanut

I mentally shudder every time I see someone use "wrapped" instead of "rapt" in a sentence. Saw it in a news article once and despaired!

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dadwasathome

People being phased rather than fazed is my bugbear. I have cancelled decade old subscriptions over this error.

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jessiesgirl

I have cancelled decade old subscriptions over this error.

 

 

Goodness can I fetch your pipe and slippers Sir and the most soothing volume of Dickens from the bookshelf?

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CallMeFeral
I know someone who uses loverly (in emails etc) when they mean lovely. I can't bring myself to point it out but do occasionally try to describe something as lovely hoping she'll notice....

 

Sure it's not intentional? I'd do that as a My Fair Lady reference... not that I have but I could...

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BluJay

Chester draws.

 

I've seen this more than once on FB selling pages. :huh:

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Sancti-claws

 

 

Actually, 'homing in' is correct.

 

http://grammarist.com/eggcorns/home-in-hone-in/

 

Or - not - http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hone%20in

 

(from the comments section) The phrases "home in" and "hone in" do not mean the same thing. They have similar but distinct meanings. "Home in" means to get closer to like a missile homing in on its target, while "hone in" means to pay close attention to, or listen to, or concentrate on something. Trying to group the two sayings together as one and decide which one is "correct" is pointless and unnecessary. (end of comment)

 

So we are trying to hone the meaning, and homing in on an answer.

Edited by Sancti-mummy
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CallMeFeral

Or - not - http://www.merriam-w...tionary/hone in

 

(from the comments section) The phrases "home in" and "hone in" do not mean the same thing. They have similar but distinct meanings. "Home in" means to get closer to like a missile homing in on its target, while "hone in" means to pay close attention to, or listen to, or concentrate on something. Trying to group the two sayings together as one and decide which one is "correct" is pointless and unnecessary. (end of comment)

 

So we are trying to hone the meaning, and homing in on an answer.

 

I can see what they are trying to say, but the grammatical use of hone does not lend itself to pairing with the 'in', so I would still say that the use of it with 'in' is due to a confusing with homing in...

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AsperHacker

A work colleague used to say 'without further adieu'

 

I'm sure a presenter said this in one of the Christmas Carol broadcasts... must find a link!

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AsperHacker

I have a friend who insists on writing "alote" for "a lot". All the time. It takes everything in my power not to correct her.

 

I argued with someone last night as to whether alot was two words or one. She was convinced it was two. She was wrong.

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com.au/2010/04/alot-is-better-than-you-at-everything.html?m=1

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missylou

In a Facebook comment I came across today, someone referred to living in a "colder sack" rather than a cul de sac. I've been having a giggle about the image it conjured in my mind ever since!

 

Edited to add: And two more that drive me crazy are "defiantly" instead of "definitely" and "devine" rather than "divine". Both seem to be really common errors.

Edited by missylou
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CallMeFeral

Saw one in another thread that I hadn't come across before (sorry :ph34r: ). I'd always heard from go to whoa but never thought about it - someone said whoa to go which made me consider it... of course, in horse riding so to whoa would be from start to stop! Weird to use it all these years without even thinking about it.

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protart roflcoptor

I know that this phrase has been discussed in a grammar thread previously. But I noticed it being used, incorrectly, in a thread the other day and it just has to stop!

 

Can we PLEASE NOT adopt the Americanism of "could care less" when we mean that we "couldn't care less".

 

I could care less about this, obviously, from taking the time to write and post this request.

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Little_Dove

My Mum used to work with a women who pronounced Archive incorrectly. She asked Mum to order arCHive boxes.

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somila

 

 

 

It took me several reads of this to work out what she was saying! Surely that's a phrase you'd check before going to print!?

 

She was also the travel writer, and had recently been to Paris, so I suspect she thought she had it all worked out. :)

 

I wanted to email and tell her, but figured somebody else already had. And it had already been published.

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AsperHacker

I can't say hors d'oeurves properly without pausing first to think about it. My grandfather always called them horse doovers (he thought it was hilarious) and though my brain says hors d'oeuvres it always comes out horse doovers.

 

Eta to make hor hors

Edited by sassjay
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