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JAPNII

Help - Just purchased a Cavoodle - now what?

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JAPNII

After months if not years of begging and pleading I have said yes to demands for a dog and put a Cavoodle on hold.

 

I've never had a dog although DH has. We only ever had cats (plus a bunny and chooks at one stage).

 

She is a puppy. And we have a scardey cat. DH works from home so she won't be alone during the day.

 

Suggestions of what we need to do when we get her home??

 

I don't know where to start..............

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Weirdly Sane

Oh dear.

 

Perhaps take the poor mutt off hold and do some proper research into the responsibilities of dog ownership.

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~Peachy keen~

OP, You're not going to get many responses you're expecting. If you do a search on EB for Cavoodles or anything 'ooodle, or responsible dog pet ownership, you'll see what the PP means. It's not pretty, but it will help, I hope!

 

:)

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FiveAus

Start by calling her by her correct "breed" name....mutt. There's no such breed as a Cavoodle.

 

And I second the idea that you take her off hold, do some research and buy a dog from a registered, ethical, pedigree breeder.

 

The thought of people actually paying to buy these poorly bred mongrels makes my eyes bleed. You do realise it's from a puppy farm, don't you?

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#YKG

Find out from where you are purchasing her what food they are feeding her and have some available for when you get her home. Changing quickly from one food to another can upset their stomach.

 

Get a harness or collar and leash for her, buy her bedding and food bowls and toys, make an appt with the a vet for a general health check and for any needles and spading appts.

 

Once she's had her needles enrol her in puppy obedience classes.

 

Try to teach toilet training ASAP when you get her home, YouTube has some helpful vids. In the meantime google as much info as you can.

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Apageintime

Start by calling her by her correct "breed" name....mutt. There's no such breed as a Cavoodle.

 

And I second the idea that you take her off hold, do some research and buy a dog from a registered, ethical, pedigree breeder.

 

The thought of people actually paying to buy these poorly bred mongrels makes my eyes bleed. You do realise it's from a puppy farm, don't you?

 

This is my advice too.

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MrsLexiK

Find out from where you are purchasing her what food they are feeding her and have some available for when you get her home. Changing quickly from one food to another can upset their stomach.

 

Get a harness or collar and leash for her, buy her bedding and food bowls and toys, make an appt with the a vet for a general health check and for any needles and spading appts.

 

Once she's had her needles enrol her in puppy obedience classes.

 

Try to teach toilet training ASAP when you get her home, YouTube has some helpful vids. In the meantime google as much info as you can.

This is my advice

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Guest JaneDoe2010

Start by calling her by her correct "breed" name....mutt. There's no such breed as a Cavoodle.

 

And I second the idea that you take her off hold, do some research and buy a dog from a registered, ethical, pedigree breeder.

 

The thought of people actually paying to buy these poorly bred mongrels makes my eyes bleed. You do realise it's from a puppy farm, don't you?

 

That.

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MrsLexiK

Those telling her to take it off hold how is it helpful to a puppy who is born? That puppy will no doubt end up in a shelter if she does that.

 

 

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*cough*

OP this was never going to end well. I am sorry but I do agree with codswallop.

 

Please do some research ASAP, both about what's involved in dog ownership & also where you are buying it from. Remember the pound or local dog home will have plenty to choose from so that is always an option.

 

I'd love a little dog but my work/travel (both leisure/work) means its not fair for them. This may change in the future but for now I have made a tough decision not to get a dog.

 

Please talk seriously with your family about what's involved and remember this is most likely a 10 - 15 year commitment.

 

Good luck.

 

Those telling her to take it off hold how is it helpful to a puppy who is born? That puppy will no doubt end up in a shelter if she does that.

 

I doubt that. These breeders are in it for the money. They will sell her to someone else.

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Weirdly Sane

Those telling her to take it off hold how is it helpful to a puppy who is born? That puppy will no doubt end up in a shelter if she does that.

 

I do see this point: the dog already exists.

 

However, the OP's post suggest that this was a case of her being worn down by demands, and probably by a sweet little puppy face, rather than a well thought out and planned decision. My response was at least as much a reaction to that.

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FiveAus

The more of these poorly bred, poorly raised puppies that are sold, the more will be born. It's an awful life for the mother dog, it's a horrid start to life for a puppy. And the unsuspecting buyers get lumped with a puppy that is likely to have all kinds of health and temperament issues as it grows up, with no breeder to fall back on for advice.

 

The fact that it's born doesn't negate the fact that it shouldn't have been, and it doesn't mean someone HAS to buy it (generally for an exorbitant amount of money).

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WinterIsComing

Somone I know bought one, they are having a terrible time. Like you, they were totally clueless, gave in to pleading of their son, and now totally regret it. The dog is needy, terrible at toilet training, cannot be left alone. The breeder sounded dodgy as hell.

 

DON"T.

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CallMeFeral

Willy-wonka-you-must-be-new-here.jpg

 

(the pet section that is...)

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CallMeFeral

Those telling her to take it off hold how is it helpful to a puppy who is born? That puppy will no doubt end up in a shelter if she does that.

 

If she already had the puppy, yes, but as it is it will probably just go to the next person on the list, and there would be one 'demand' fewer for these animals.

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Feral Becky

I have seen some pretty unethical (IMO) behaviour from registered breeders lately.

 

Including a King Charles Cavalier breeding dog three years old), rehomed wearing nappies as he still hadn't been toilet trained.

 

A mum KCC who had to be on a plane from Perth to Adelaide as soon as her season started, to get pregnant again (5 years old).

 

My friend took both of these from the breeder but the breeder is still having a say in what happens to the 5 year old mum.

 

I'd tell her to jump and get the dog sterilised, so it could enjoy being a pet as it is at the moment.

 

Not all registered pedigree breeders are ethical.

Not all oodle breeders are bad.

 

I have two rehomes, both got too much for their owners.

 

To be actually helpful, OP-

 

I say take the dog to puppy classes, take it out a lot to socialise it. Love it to death. Dogs really don't need much, they just need to be loved and be part of the pack. They don't need to be breeding machines whether they are purebred or not.

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FiveAus

No, not all registered breeders are ethical (but I honestly don't see any issues with the two examples you cited.......dogs rehomed from registered breeders are sometimes kennel dogs and won't have been house trained, that's up to the new owner. And brood b**ches can have puppies when they are 5, that's a quite reasonable age to have a litter, and they have to get to the stud dog somehow.)

 

But there are NO ethical puppy farmers. They don't health test for inherited diseases to make sure they aren't doubling up on the genes that can cause them. They don't screen for hip and elbow dysplasia. They just whack two unsuspecting dogs, generally not even of the same breed together, give them a stupid name and sell the offspring for exorbitant prices.

They don't offer any after sales support, the provide nothing in the way of background information to the new owners and don't have a care in the world where their puppies end up, as long as they've got their greedy hands on the $$$$.

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bonnybabe

if you decide to keep the dog - look into pet insurance. Petplan is currently the 'best' as it doesn't take a condition then after 12 months reclass it as a pre existing condition. Ie if your dog gets diabetes, most will let you claim for 12 months, then once that 12 months hits you cannot claim for its diabetes anymore as its a pre existing condition.

 

Pet classes are a must, and get ready to exercise it a lot.

 

I have two of these dogs, and they are best when run on the bike using a safe attachment - can only be done after they are 12 months old.

 

Nothing else tires them out. They dig and are bat sh*t crazy - but that could be their personality, or as they get a bit lonely sometimes.

 

If you can do it - I would take the pup off hold and jump on dogz online, and pick a breed of dog that is said to be 'quieter' than you think you want.

 

I have not met a calm oodle yet.

 

Good luck!

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MrsLexiK

Perhaps it will help stop the next puppy being born. If the puppy farmer can't sell them, he won't breed them. I doubt it would go to a shelter, but if it did - at least the puppy farmer wouldn't be profiting from it.

I meet a registered breeder once, he killed the mother dog who breed the wrong colours. You would think rom his website and his history he was ethical.

 

I actually do believe their is a small group of people between puppy farms and breeding mutts. There are some people who want the cavoodle or spoodle to be a recognised breed much like some people want the Murray River curly coated retriever to be a registered breed. (I do agree they are the minority to the puppy farms) but what is done is done isn't it better for the OP who is seeking info to be the owner of a pup then someone who doesn't know what you need to do next and doesn't ask?

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nano-tyrannus

Start by calling her by her correct "breed" name....mutt. There's no such breed as a Cavoodle.

 

And I second the idea that you take her off hold, do some research and buy a dog from a registered, ethical, pedigree breeder.

 

The thought of people actually paying to buy these poorly bred mongrels makes my eyes bleed. You do realise it's from a puppy farm, don't you?

 

It makes my eyes bleed that anyone would pay money for a pedigree dog. Watch this documentary, Pedigree Dogs Exposed:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyCHIIn-eiI

 

BTW, mixed breeds are much better than a pedigree. When you breed an animal with low genetic diversity you end up with an inbred animal that will be plagued with genetic problems for it's life. 20 mins 20 seconds into that documentary sums it up quite well.

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The Old Feral

LOL!

 

Even if there was a hint of truth in that ^ ^, I doubt the plague of inbreeding is going to be corrected in one generation, so JAPN's puppy is doomed either way.

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lorello

Hi OP

 

My sister purchased a Cavoodle or mutt as they are called. She is a nice dog, my sister went to puppy school and did the whole nine yards with her, she is well looked after. She has had a leg operation, but is fine now.

 

I myself have 2 purebred dogs bought from breeders, great dogs also, one breeder was very helpful before and after purchasing. The other could not care less, never heard from her again. I also have had one dog have cruciate ligament problems all fixed and good now.

 

So its the luck of the draw, Im not into puppy farms, and my sister when purchasing a dog in the future would more than likely go through a registered breeder aswell. Read some books, new puppys are hard work, I found it harder than a newborn baby...!!

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CallMeFeral

Nano I actually prefer mutts to pedigrees as well and agree that there is no guarantee in either case - but there's no need to pay extortionate prices to puppy farms to obtain an inbred (yes this happens to 'cavoodles' and designer dogs too) cross with an unknown temperament when I'm sure there are enough young mutts looking for homes and being put down.

 

If people want to predict certain characteristics, then I guess they get pedigrees. But if someone wants a mutt, why not rescue one rather than encourage the production of them?

 

IMO the designer dogs are the worst of both worlds.

Edited by CallMeProtart
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la di dah

Those telling her to take it off hold how is it helpful to a puppy who is born? That puppy will no doubt end up in a shelter if she does that.

And if she takes it home without any idea what to do with it, it'll be easier to rehome at 2 years old? (It won't)

 

And the breeder making money off it will just encourage them to breed more.

 

BTW, mixed breeds are much better than a pedigree. When you breed an animal with low genetic diversity you end up with an inbred animal that will be plagued with genetic problems for it's life. 20 mins 20 seconds into that documentary sums it up quite well.

 

You don't avoid genetic problems by breeding a badly bred poodle to a badly bred cavalier. The argument for mutts is an argument for a truly generalized dog where unhealthy pups die and the dog is moderate in size and ability with no exaggerated features at all. Certainly not "a cavalier but with a woolly coat."

 

I can see an argument for saying some purebred lines are badly bred. But cavoodles don't fix those problems.

 

I like crossbreeds, and I like purebreeds. And I've only ever owned rescues (though some were purebred and some were crosses) I just don't believe for a minute that throwing any dog over another dog is "better than a purebred" because of some mystic ability to only combine the good genes. Sometimes it's the bad genes you get.

 

There are absolutely revolting practices in the purebred breeding community. There are breeds exaggerated well beyond what they looked like even 50 years ago. But don't hold up mutts as some sort of silver bullet. Especially a poodle + cavalier as if that's somehow going to be healthier than either the poodle or cavalier parentage? How does that even make any sense?

 

EDIT: I could totally see getting a mutt puppy if I was willing to gamble on health and temperment and it needed a home. I wouldn't pay for it beyond an adoption fee and desexing/chipping though.

Edited by la di dah
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