The Aussie company giving employees $100 a day for childcare

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 Photo: Getty Images

Would you like your boss to give you an extra $100 a day to help out with childcare costs?

It might sound too good to be true, but that is exactly what is happening at one Sydney business.

Advertising agency The Works announced the Employer-Funded Childcare Bonus policy as part of the company's family first initiative which aims to encourage employees to return to work after taking leave for a baby.

Kevin Macmillan of The Works.
Kevin Macmillan of The Works.  Photo: LinkedIn

The payment will be offered for the first six months after an employee returns to work from parental leave.

"It's for the primary care giver – the mum or the dad, but obviously the majority are mums – that are returning to work," Kevin Macmillan, partner at The Works, told Mumbrella.

"If we can make it simpler for parents to return to work then we are only going to improve as a business and they are going to be able to stay on the career path they want to stay on."

The payment is part of the third phase of the company's initiative to become more family friendly. The first two phases focused on flexible work arrangements and reward and recognition programs.

It will be available to employees that have been employed with the agency for two or more years, with 31 per cent of the employees eligible to access the immediately. It is predicted the number of eligible employees will increase by 20 percent next year.

The company will not align the payment with any particular childcare provider giving parents the freedom to choose what form of care best suits their family.  

"Parents need as much flexibility as possible when it comes to their kids, we wanted to ensure the parents were the decision makers, whether that is a nanny, early childcare centre or their parents we want to support that decision and respect that everyone's situation differs," Mr McMillan told industry publication Campaign Brief.  

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"We currently have 32 per cent of our staff working part-time after returning from maternity leave who have all supported the policy saying that childcare is one of the major hurdles in returning to work due to the costs associated."

Mr McMillan said the policy was "a natural next step for the industry."

However he admitted more definitely needed to be done to make the advertising industry truly family-friendly.

"You walk into an agency at 7pm in the evening and you see 20 parents working at their computers when they really should be at home giving their kids a bath," he told Mumbrella.

"(As an industry) I think we have a long long way to go because it's certainly not perfect for mothers and for fathers."