Seven minutes out of sight: Probe after Perth boy drowns in daycare pool

The Carramar home where a toddler was found floating in the pool.
The Carramar home where a toddler was found floating in the pool. Photo: Channel Nine News Perth

A toddler who drowned at a family daycare centre in Perth had been left alone outside for seven minutes while the operator of the service settled a baby in the lounge room, an inquest has heard.

Lachlan James Mitchell was two days shy of his third birthday on November 10, 2015 when he was found floating face-down in the Carramar family daycare centre's below-ground swimming pool.

The WA Coroner's Court heard on Monday he may have scaled the pool fence by climbing onto pot plants that were nearby or the gate had not been properly closed.

Keith Morrison, a neighbour to the Carramar home, gave CPR to the little boy.
Keith Morrison, a neighbour to the Carramar home, gave CPR to the little boy. Photo: Channel Nine News Perth

The carer of the facility found the boy in the pool and ran to a neighbouring house to ask for help.

Keith Morrison, a FIFO worker who has a child of similar age, had just refreshed his first aid qualifications and gave the toddler 15 minutes of CPR.

Tony Simpson, WA's community services minister at the time, said once findings from an inquest into Lachlan's death were considered he would propose banning pools at family day cares centres.

"I personally want to see some regulations to know that Lachlan's death was not in vain," Mr Simpson said.

"We can see there wasn't any supervision, which is one of the key issues, and the (ratio of the) number of children to supervisors," he said.

Mr Simpson said the pool at the centre had ben inspected for each of the past five years and its self-closing fence complied with the 1.2m height rule under the Local Government Act.

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He'd also been told the operators were considered exemplary, and it was believed Lachlan somehow had climbed over the fence, possibly by piling up toys, but that had not been confirmed.

"Somehow he managed to get into that pool," Mr Simpson said.

Then-education Minister Peter Collier also said the government would consider reviewing pool regulations for family day cares.

"Anything we can do to make any public venue safe for children, especially when there is water involved," he said.

Industry association Family Day Care Australia said the death was tragic and, in the interest of child safety, any potential review of guidelines was an appropriate response.