Quad goals: One in 15 million identical quads born amid pandemic

Instagram/TheMarrtheMerrier
Instagram/TheMarrtheMerrier 

Meet Harrison, Hardy, Henry and Hudson, the one in 15 million identical quadruplets who were born amid the coronavirus. Proud parents Jenny and Chris Marr of Dallas, Texas, have dubbed their four baby boys 'quad goals' and, two months after their birth are still wondering how they'll tell them apart.

The couple, who are both only children, have documented their journey on their Instagram account The Marr the Merrier, since learning they had four  (naturally conceived!) babies on board.

In a Facebook post, Jenny re-lived the moment they found out the news, after initially being told they were having triplets.

"During the sonogram, our sonography became increasingly quiet. It was taking a long time, and the look on the sonographer's face was one of uncertainty. I finally asked her 'we lost one didn't we? It's okay I understand'. Her response was reserved and finally said 'I don't know what to tell y'all, but there are FOUR babies in here!'"

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jenny Marr (@themarrthemerrier) on

But the shocks only continued.

The 35-year-olds learned that their babies shared the one placenta, with Jenny noting it was "the riskiest pregnancy there is. Four babies feeding out of one bowl."

"The risk was that one of the babies can develop stronger and basically take away from the other babies," Chris told TODAY parents. 

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According to Jenny, the four womb mates "shared incredibly well'.

"There were no incidents on the sonogram even leading up to that where we were worried that one of them, or two or three of them, would be significantly smaller," she said.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jenny Marr (@themarrthemerrier) on

On 16 March, at 28.5 weeks, the couple welcomed their beautiful boys.

"They were all born in three minutes. It's incredible," Jenny said. "We called them our baby birds because they really looked like baby birds."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jenny Marr (@themarrthemerrier) on

As the babies entered NICU amid the coronavirus, the pair shared glimpses of hospital life with their new additions. 

"We were able to hold the babies all together today" they wrote. "It was one of the most magical moments we've ever had. The emotions just streamed out our eyes. So grateful to our amazing NiCU team making this happen for us today. It always feels real that we have four babies but today was extra real! We are so incredibly blessed."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jenny Marr (@themarrthemerrier) on

After just six weeks, it was time to graduate from NICU to the "Big Boy Unit,"

"We walked into the NiCU today and they said "ok mom and dad today is the day. Your boys aren't NiCU babies anymore. They're big and healthy and ready for special care," Jenny shared in an update. "After just under 6 weeks at NiCU our 33 week and 3 day old boys were done. Never in a million years did we think that portion of our journey would be so short and uneventful with our babies born at just 28 weeks 4 days."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jenny Marr (@themarrthemerrier) on

All four bubs are now home with the couple's first "baby" Zeke.

"Having babies during a global pandemic has been quite the experience," Jenny shared. "Everyone at Texas Health Presbyterian Dallas made us and our babies top priority for care and safety. I only hope that one day I can hug each of them and say thank you ... Now onto the next adventure of having them home and raising them into wonderful little men.

"My sweet first babe, Zeke, I promise you that we are done bringing home babies. You are going to be so busy helping take care of these baby birds. You're already so curious and worried and it is just the sweetest thing."

There are only around 70 sets of identical quadruplets worldwide. 
"To even think that we are going to add to this number blows my mind," Jenny writes.  "When our doctor told me yes they're identical I asked for statistics, he said there really aren't any. We have been blessed with such amazing little miracles. I'm so excited to be their mommy."
Dr Lauren Murray, OB-GYN at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, told TODAY, "It's unbelievable. It'll never happen again in my career. I said, 'Girl, go buy a few lottery tickets because those are the kind of odds we're dealing with."
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jenny Marr (@themarrthemerrier) on

 
But while the boys might be identical, Jenny and Chris are enjoying learning their individual quirks.
"They each have little bitty characteristics," Chris told TODAY. "When we sit down and look at them we can figure out who they are but if you just look at them from a distance, they all look the same. Thank God, Hudson's a little smaller than everybody else and quieter."
You can follow their journey here: