Jump to content

Starting Law degree
Anyone else doing/ done law?


  • Please log in to reply
33 replies to this topic

#1 Super Turtle

Posted 02 May 2012 - 07:39 PM

I'm starting law mid year and I'm so excited.  I'm also feeling quite nervous about the workload (I am only doing part time but have other commitments as well).  I'll be studying by distance education.  



Is anyone else studying law or has done?  How do you find it?  Is it very tedious?  OR do you love it?  


It might seem a bit strange but I actually don't particularly want to be a lawyer, it's more an interest thing and one of my 'bucket list' to do things that I want to acheive in my life.  Does this seem silly?  

Would love to hear from anyone!  original.gif

#2 Guest_Spunkrat_*

Posted 02 May 2012 - 09:52 PM

..

Edited by Spunkrat, 01 September 2012 - 02:37 PM.


#3 Super Turtle

Posted 03 May 2012 - 01:00 PM

I'll be studying at university of New England.  It was between them and CDU for me.

Are you studying on or off campus and who through?  


I am prepared for a lot of reading, but are you saying it is more than the recommended 10 hours per subject each week?  I'm only starting off with one subject as although I only work part time I am pretty busy!

#4 YandiGirl

Posted 03 May 2012 - 01:08 PM

QUOTE (Spunkrat @ 02/05/2012, 07:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
... Contract Law (ick). ...


Wash your mouth out. Contracts are awesome. biggrin.gif

It will feel really, really hard at first, but as you learn how to learn law, it will become easier. You will become a lot better at reading only what you need to read.

I loved it. I did practice as a lawyer but it wasn't for me. I now work in the construction industry (I've also done a masters in construction law) as a commercial manager and use my LLB every day, but don't have to fuss around with being a practicing lawyer.

#5 Super Turtle

Posted 03 May 2012 - 01:32 PM

That sounds great yandigirl; great that you can use the degree but don't necessarily have to practice as a lawyer.  

I actually think I'll enjoy contracts (I Hope anyway lol).  

Human rights law interests me.  

Has anyone had experience with law at UNE?

#6 Guest_Spunkrat_*

Posted 03 May 2012 - 02:50 PM

..

Edited by Spunkrat, 01 September 2012 - 02:36 PM.


#7 KristyMum-

Posted 03 May 2012 - 05:14 PM

Another one doing Law
somewhere between 3rd and 4th year part time.

QUOTE
I'll be studying by distance education.
interesting... I'll go check it out.

QUOTE
... Contract Law (ick). ...
oh I remember the days of Contract Law. lol I actually quite liked it and compared to some of the other units would much prefer to do that again!


#8 Sassy Dingo

Posted 03 May 2012 - 06:44 PM

I graduated from my degree a few years ago. I remember getting my reading list the first week and being horrified - mine was more than the 10 hours per subject per week and I was doing 5 subjects that semester. Can I just suggest, that for me at least, I treated a lot of the readings as optional. If we get an assignment topic I would go back and read the relevant readings, but I just did the course guide and read the text book. I managed to get by and am gainfully employed original.gif

#9 Super Turtle

Posted 04 May 2012 - 01:56 PM

I'm just doing an introductory law unit first!  I hope I like it I'm getting a bit nervous!

#10 Tenacious C

Posted 04 May 2012 - 02:10 PM

As others have said there will be a lot of reading.

Am am currently practising as a lawyer, but there are many career options out there for someone with a law degree. Some of the occupations people I know with law degrees work in are public service(many!), regulation and compliance, legal publishing, legal recruitment company, project and contract management.

Or you could follow in Andrew O'Keefe's footsteps be a lawyer for a while then enter the world of tekevision  biggrin.gif

#11 mum2kichisao

Posted 04 May 2012 - 02:20 PM

I am doing my juris doctor (graduate law degree)
I am in between my 1st and 2nd year - have completed 5 subjects so far, doing 2 at the moment.
I started off externally at Edith Cowan University, but transferred at the start of the year to Murdoch. I am doing 2 units. I have 4 children and work part time.

Lots of hard work but I love it.

I also love contracts!

#12 2puzzled

Posted 04 May 2012 - 03:36 PM

Amin my final semester at UNE as an external (started off as LPAB student and then switched to LLB at UNE). Am completing my Hons year concurrent with my final subject. I have been working full time and studying part time since 2005... so looking forward to the end. I took three semesters off during this period due to work commitments (1 semester off was for a holiday - yay!)

Contracts is foundational - gotta learn to love it! original.gif Contracts and property lay the framework for so many later subjects that you need to give them a good shot.

There is a LOT of reading in law. A LOT. Be selective in your non-core readings to make sure you're not wasting time. Also, make the use of casebooks where you can rather than reading the full text of your prescribed cases, unless your lecturer states you must read the full text of given cases. It can be too hard to see the forest for the trees otherwise!

All universities appear to be quite disorganised and UNE is no exception. The distance learning can exacerbate this so it can be frustrating as an external student.

Also, don't fall into the trap of getting behind in listening to your lectures and thinking you can catch up any time because you will find it impossible to catch up in any meaningful way. If you find the lectures helpful, try to make sure to listen to them the week they are released.

I am pretty disorganised and often fall behind and then cram like a lunatic. It works for me, marks-wise, but I do resent not being able to take the time to follow up on the areas of law I am particularly curious about, because I only have left enough time to get through the core reading.

Feel free to PM if you have any questions about the subjects, intensive schools etc etc. Enjoy this new journey - it can be quite a long one but it is rewarding and very useful, even if you don't want to head into practice.

cheers!

#13 jade06

Posted 05 May 2012 - 02:21 PM

I'm in my last year of a law degree.

You have to be driven and motivated to even get through the first year - any time your committment seems to be wandering, you will be questioned 'how much do you want this degree', or 'do you really want to be a lawyer?'

You will develop a thick skin dealing with somewhat blunt law lecturers, and other law students willing to fight to the death for their grades. It can get a bit ruthless at times - after a while you will have no shame in treading on other's toes if it is the difference between them and you getting the grade. All good practice for graduation.

There's lots of group work involved, which will drive you crazy if you are studying externally.

Study your first year cases extensively, they will come back to bite you in the bum for the rest of your degree.

If you're hoping to make a career out of something law related, you might be best to do a double degree -  careers in law are really competitive and something I'm a little concerned about. I did a degree in Behavioural Science before this, and I wish I did it at the same time, as it would make the study less 'dry'.

However, if you are passionate, there is so much that you can do and learn. Personally, I love the area of international law as well as human rights, it just holds something special for me. I'm wanting to do a placement with Projects Abroad when I'm finished my degree. I recommend knowing what area you would like to use your degree in, and choosing electrives to follow..

I dont know one law student who spends the recommended 40 hours per week though... we do what we can. Its as much about learning 'how' to study, as 'what' you are studying.

Good luck!

#14 missus_b80

Posted 05 May 2012 - 02:49 PM

I finished my law degree in 2008 and the others are right in advising you that it is a lot of reading. However, you quickly work out that not every single thing listed is 'essential' (even if it's listed as essential reading by the lecturers!).
Use the study guides and get friendly with some other students so you can share the load of making exam summaries.

Enjoy it and try not to get too tied up in the super competitive aspect of it. Remember that although law is a competitive profession, filled with ambitious achievers, it's best to not get known as the person who will 'tread on toes' to 'win at all costs'. Keep your eye on the prize of your degree.
And also remember that the legal profession is really quite small in Australia and word gets around. I'd rather be known as the person who shared my notes and was generally nice to be around than the hard-nosed b$#ch who trod on others to get where I wanted to be.

For the record, I've worked at top tier and mid tier since graduating and I don't think for a second that had I have been more ruthless in my pursuit of top grades that I would have had more success as a graduate.

Best of luck with your studies.

#15 Froger

Posted 05 May 2012 - 03:06 PM

QUOTE (jade06 @ 05/05/2012, 02:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm in my last year of a law degree.

You have to be driven and motivated to even get through the first year - any time your committment seems to be wandering, you will be questioned 'how much do you want this degree', or 'do you really want to be a lawyer?'

You will develop a thick skin dealing with somewhat blunt law lecturers, and other law students willing to fight to the death for their grades. It can get a bit ruthless at times - after a while you will have no shame in treading on other's toes if it is the difference between them and you getting the grade. All good practice for graduation.

There's lots of group work involved, which will drive you crazy if you are studying externally.

Study your first year cases extensively, they will come back to bite you in the bum for the rest of your degree.

If you're hoping to make a career out of something law related, you might be best to do a double degree -  careers in law are really competitive and something I'm a little concerned about. I did a degree in Behavioural Science before this, and I wish I did it at the same time, as it would make the study less 'dry'.

However, if you are passionate, there is so much that you can do and learn. Personally, I love the area of international law as well as human rights, it just holds something special for me. I'm wanting to do a placement with Projects Abroad when I'm finished my degree. I recommend knowing what area you would like to use your degree in, and choosing electrives to follow..

I dont know one law student who spends the recommended 40 hours per week though... we do what we can. Its as much about learning 'how' to study, as 'what' you are studying.

Good luck!



Oh wow Jade, that is certainly different to my experience with law lecturers. Most are very into social justice in my experience, and are extremely caring and willing to work with a student who is having problems.

The same with law students. Most seem to be passionately committed to many good causes, and especially the older students are very caring and sharing. The younger students may still be pretty competitive after recently completing high school, which I think encourages non-cooperation unfortunately. But the oldies are sort of over that competitive high-school behaviour.

Anyway OP, IMO a law degree these days is kind of like Arts used to be considered - a good general degree that can be used to take you a lot of places, not just in the law area. Additionally you can usually do a minor in something else (as you usually have quite a few free electives), like business, sociology, criminology, government etc.

Law itself is quite interesting anyway, especially when you have to study the history of the development of the common law. Some of the older cases are fascinating, and seeing the development of the common law is equally fascinating. If your uni is less into black letter law, and more into a critique of the law, you will probably find yourself studying more social justice issues than the law itself (which is also interesting and can be teamed well with more artys subjects if you want to do a minor or a double degree). Whereas if your uni concentrates on teaching black letter law, then business subjects and the like can team well with your degree, as it is likely to spark more of an interest in that direction for you.

But if you don't want to practice as a lawyer, it is an expensive degree to do, compared to say a degree in legal studies (which may get you into the same area of interest if you don't intend to practice).

Edited by SarahM72, 05 May 2012 - 03:07 PM.


#16 jade06

Posted 05 May 2012 - 03:16 PM

I must have had a vastly different experience to you guys...anyways, I'm glad you have found it a positive & rewarding experience with lecs & students alike.  

In the last three weeks I have had

There were 8 spots for assessment in a mini-moot. There was one extra student who wasn't enroled, and I was the 9th to volunteer for assessment. My lecturer encouraged me to figure out who the extra student was and to name and shame. Otherwise, there just might not be another assessment slot.

When I had a tutorial go until 11pm, and I mentioned it was really hard to retain information at that time of night, I was told 'how much do you want the degree', and basically to 'suck it up'.

I had cellulitis in my hand, and got an extension on an assignment of 12 hours.

I could go on lol... perhaps that is where I'm coming from. Perhaps I've just had a particularly bad run of lecturers? I do compare it to the care and understanding that was shown by my lecs when I did behavioural science though.

I have made some study-buddies who can be really helpful (one in particular has been a godsend), particularly if we have something in common. Most of the other students are like me - left school a long time ago, many are parents, working full time, or have other committments as well.

#17 rocketsurgeon

Posted 05 May 2012 - 05:10 PM

I'm going to go against the grain, and am hoping this won't be taken as misleading or bad advice, but I found a law degree considerably easier to do than a commerce degree. I did combined commerce/law straight out of high school and found the hours and input required for law much less than commerce (accounting and marketing majors).

Yes, there's a lot of reading but you'll learn what is essential reading and what isn't. This didn't kick in for me until third year though lol, which equated to second year of the law degree. Torts, contracts, criminal & property were all quite painful lol. By the final year you'll only be doing electives, enjoyable and easy mainly due to interest and passion.

I strongly disagree with treading on toes and being competitve. If you do choose to practice, your fellow students will be your colleagues one day. I found marketing competitive, law not at all.

I recently bumped into my first law lecturer the other day at a client function. He didn't remember my face, but he remembered my name. He remarked how another student of his became a colleague a few years after graduating. As with all professions, the circle is small.

Like anything, if you're genuinely interested, and it sounds like you are, you will be fine original.gif

#18 chat

Posted 05 May 2012 - 07:18 PM

Ohhh exciting, another law student :-)

I am 3rd year (face-to-face) and do two units at a time because I work full time.

There is a lot of reading but I have discovered some short cuts along the way tongue.gif   I love law.  I love applying tests from cases to facts and the joy of debating.  I went into it not knowing what I would do with it (more of a challenge) but I have discovered something I am very passionate about.

I did contract law earlier on in my degree so didn't enjoy it as much as I probably would now that I am more experienced.

QUOTE
Has anyone had experience with law at UNE?

I have a few friends who are doing law face-to-face wbut started through UNE.  It is hard very hard.  I actually tossed up the idea of going online at one point but they all talked me out of it.  But at the end of the day UNE has a good reputation.  I think doing this knd of degree online would be much harder than face-to-face.  I need my weekly tutorials to work it all out.

Edited by chat, 05 May 2012 - 07:23 PM.


#19 Super Turtle

Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:36 PM

Do you think it is a bit silly to study it if I don't want to be a lawyer?  

I am aware that it's very expensive and I'm worried I'll never get it paid off!

#20 chat

Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:45 PM

No, I don't think it is silly to study it if you don't intend to be a lawyer. You will find as you go through that the skills you pick up are useful in many fields of work. I would love to practice but am now quite well paid in the public service so won't be able to take the pay cut to start out again. I never went in it for the money. I have accepted that I will most likely be a government lawyer and wouldn't mind picking up a little bit of volunteer work at a community legal centre. I think that would be a good balance and would make me very happy.

#21 Jobrielle

Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:49 PM

I did my law degree through UNE, some face to face, and the last 4 units externally. Could not recommend them highly enough, and Armidale is a beautiful setting for res school! Law is a LOT of reading. But for me, I would describe it as easy yet time consuming. I can highly recommend medico legal law, very interesting unit!  And watch out for the jurisprudence lecturer, if he is still there. He is boring as batsh*t, seriously, I failed that unit three times because I could not bring myself to keep listening to him. That class used to have a very high fail rate.

#22 cln

Posted 05 May 2012 - 09:43 PM

QUOTE (Chocolate icecream @ 03/05/2012, 01:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Has anyone had experience with law at UNE?


Hi OP, I am a year ahead of you - I started via UNE halfway through last year. Are you starting with LS100? That was my first unit, and I found it a good intro unit. I found there was quite bit of hand holding in this unit. For example, for the two assignments there were sample questions and answers provided, and the lecturer was pretty generous in providing feedback on questions related directly to the assignments, so I found the assignments fairly straightforward (I got strong Distinctions for both).

Personally, I am not loving distance education. I don't think it is for me, but at the moment it's my only option. I'm also finding it a bit hard to feel connected to UNE. This is my 3rd degree. I don't find I have a lot to do with UNE - I get more correspondence from my previous Uni as a grad than I do from UNE. I was intending to go to a residential this trimester to try and feel a bit more connected, but unfortunately had to cancel as I couldn't travel at that time.

If I can answer any other questions send me a PM original.gif

#23 YandiGirl

Posted 07 May 2012 - 09:40 AM

For those who question the value of completing a law degree and not practicing......I am earning 5 times what I was earning in practice.

#24 Guest_CaptainOblivious_*

Posted 07 May 2012 - 10:16 AM

Another person just saying that the legal world is very small and you need to be careful because the person you cross now may have a parent who sits in on your job interview in a couple of years, or they end up working in the same firm as you, or on the same field at a different firm. In each place I've worked, my boss would come and see me about applicants who had attended my uni before they had an interview and do the same to the other lawyers if the applicant had been to their uni at roughly the same time.

The expression 'the toes you step on today may be attached to the a*se you have to kiss tomorrow' is very apt in law and you should consider it while you're an undergrad.

Likewise, one of my best friends from my res college is now a law lecturer at UNE and I can guarantee you that she would be less than thrilled to have a student trying to climb over others to get themselves a better grade.  

In terms of making it through, work out which kinds of subjects you're more likely to find interesting and mix them throughout the semesters where you have to do the really dry subjects. For example, I did contracts, property, constitutional law and criminal law at the same time. It means you can stay motivated more easily. You should probably sit down and map out the whole course at the beginning so you make sure you've covered all of the prerequisites in time to do the electives when you want to do them.

Some of the ones I found the most interesting were medico-legal issues, torts, criminal law, indigenous issues and moot. There were lots of others, but it was ages ago and I can't remember what they were.



#25 K-nut's Mummy

Posted 07 May 2012 - 09:48 PM

I've just enrolled in law and am really looking forward to it although I too am very apprehensive about the amount of work involved and how that's going to go with single parenting.




2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

Natural pain relief in the early stages of labour

While managing labour pains on your own can be daunting, there are a number of natural pain relief options to help you cope until you are admitted to hospital.

Chinese woman gives birth to quintuplets

After six years of trying for a baby, a couple’s dreams have come true many times over after the mum gave birth to quintuplets this week.

Five-year-old shoots nine-month-old brother dead

A nine-month-old baby boy died on Monday after he was shot in the head by his five-year-old brother in their grandfather's home.

'Is that baby yours?'

She is my daughter. I gave birth to her. I nurse her. But she doesn't have any of my genes.

Episiotomy in childbirth: not just 'a little snip'

Episiotomies have a place in maternity care – and can occasionally save lives – but should not be performed routinely.

Toddler aggression not caused by language delays after all: study

The logic was that children who don’t have the language to fully express themselves will lash out when they’re misunderstood. Not anymore.

Why we chose to adopt a child with Down sydrome

Everyone in foster care (and really in life) has something that makes them more vulnerable. We just know what our son's is.

Object of desire

Curvy mums make clever babies

Scientists appear to have discovered why women have evolved to have more curves than men – shapely thighs and bottoms lead to healthier babies.

'We'll make sure they know how much she loved them'

A first-time mum will never get to hold her four newborns, dying shortly after giving birth to the quadruplets.

The baby names NZ knocked back in 2014

A New Zealander has tried to name their baby Senior Constable but didn't get away with it - and numbering children is also a no-no.

How can you go into labour without knowing you're pregnant?

For most of us, the idea that a woman could carry a child to full-term without knowing she is pregnant is mind-boggling.

Will you get to the hospital in time?

Worrying your baby will be delivered by the roadside is a common concern for many mothers-to-be. So how likely are you to be caught short?

Video: Funny 'Lips Are Moving' parody just for mums

Meghan Trainor's song 'Lips Are Moving' was already a hit, but now it's been turned into a hilarious parody that is set to be very popular with frustrated mums everywhere.

Out with the clutter

Decluttering by the numbers: take the 30-day challenge

Forget the 5:2 diet - Twitter's 30-day declutter challenge will have your house back in shape in no time (well, a month).

Parents, don't be too hard on yourselves

We need to stop damning parents of today, and embrace their appetite for knowledge instead.

Is my baby normal?

There are chubby Buddha babies and there are thin, smaller babies. Neither are right or wrong, they are all 'normal'.

When an older sibling starts school

When one child goes to ‘big school’ and leaves the other behind, it can cause deep upset. Here's how to make the transition easier.

Stray cat saves abandoned baby

They say dogs are man's best friend, but one cat has proven felines can be just as devoted to their human companions.

How strangers are helping a mum's wish come true after her death

A mum of five, Liz Marquez wanted to breastfeed her premmie son for a year. So when she passed away suddenly, her friends - and strangers - stepped in to help.

Win an Octonauts prize pack

To celebrate the launch of Octonauts Live! Operation Reef Shield, a spectacular underwater adventure live on stage, we are giving away an amazing Octonauts prize pack to one lucky fan.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Stars help save choking babies

It's an important lesson to learn, but one that busy new mums and dads might overlook until it's too late.

New Girl star Zooey Deschanel pregnant

Actress Zooey Deschanel is expecting her first child with her producer boyfriend Jacob Pechenik.

16 times 'dad reflexes' saved the day

Of course, in some cases they may be the ones who actually got their child into a precarious position in the first place, but we'll ignore that for now.

Couple's 'non-traditional' pregnancy announcement goes viral

Knowing you are not the father of your pregnant wife's baby would usually indicate a rocky relationship ahead for traditional parents.

The trials and tribulations of identical triplet newborns

Pip Donnelly is still playing spot the difference with her newborn identical triplets, Isabelle, Georgina and Frankie.

Win an Octonauts prize pack

To celebrate the launch of Octonauts Live! Operation Reef Shield, a spectacular underwater adventure live on stage, we are giving away an amazing Octonauts prize pack to one lucky fan.

Earthquake baby thriving five years on

Jenny Alexis is lucky to be alive after spending four days buried in the rubble of the 2010 Haitian earthquake, but now she's a thriving five year old.

Please don't say I'm lucky because I was adopted

On the one hand I was having a regular life with friends and sports and sleepovers and school. But I was also always wondering: Did my mother love me? What was wrong with me?

An open letter to non-parents who offer advice on child-rearing

Kitty, when you’re the parent of my child you’re welcome to wade in with an opinion – but until then, I’d prefer you to have a supportive ear and a glass of wine ready.

Couple arrested over baby gun video

A US couple faces charges after investigators say they found mobile phone videos showing the woman's 12-month-old daughter putting a handgun in her mouth.

NSW Health dumps 10-year limit on frozen embryos

A 10-year time limit on storing frozen embryos that were created with donor sperm has been dropped by the NSW government.

How my happy-go-lucky husband became a monster

Sharan Nicholson-Rogers watched her husband change from a happy-go-lucky police officer into an unpredictable man prone to violent and emotional outbursts.

Dads-to-be experience hormonal changes, too

Dads-to-be experience hormonal changes in line with their pregnant partners, a new study shows.

'They were just doing their job': mum of toddler killed in police chase gone wrong

"They were just doing their job. I feel so sorry for them. It is all just too sad."

Miscarriages to be formally recognised by NSW government

Women who miscarry will be able to obtain an optional "recognition of loss" certificate as a formal recognition of their often heartbreaking loss.

Cafe cubby house 'too noisy' for neighbours

Teenage parties, domestic disputes, or raucous late night pubs are the things that usually come to mind when you think neighbourhood noise complaints.

Dad films baby playing with snake

Most parents would not consider a snake an appropriate playmate for their baby, but a US dad who filmed his daughter playing with a python has defended himself against criticism.

Clever breastfeeding products

Check out this range of products designed to help make your breastfeeding journey more enjoyable, manageable and convenient.

Win with The Boxtrolls

To celebrate the release of The Boxtrolls on 3D Blu-ray, DVD & Digital with UltraViolet, we're giving you the chance to win a Boxtroll stationary package and DVD.

 

School Term 1

Get after-school care sorted

Wait lists too long at OSHC? Use www.findababysitter.com.au to meet local nannies now.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.