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Calm placid baby to bossy toddler overnight


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#1 winterlove

Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:27 PM

My DD (18 months) was a lovely placid baby and could entertain herself for hours on the mat until very recently. It seemed almost overnight she went from calm and easygoing child who would eat anything and play happily to a demanding, tantrum throwing toddler who hits, head buts and cries throughout the day to get what she wants and has become fussy with her food. The toddler transition came on so fast that I took her to the doctor because I thought it could be an ear infection but nothing was wrong and the behaviour has continued for weeks.

  

  My DS was a difficult demanding baby so I never really noticed the transition as such.

  

  I was just wondering other peoples experiences who had a happy easygoing baby to very difficult toddler? I guess I just wrongly assumed that she would be an easygoing toddler.




#2 ubermum

Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:30 PM

lol, you should see what my calm, placid baby to bossy toddler is like at 4yo.   ohmy.gif  biggrin.gif

#3 winterlove

Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:35 PM

QUOTE (ubermum @ 28/04/2012, 08:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
lol, you should see what my calm, placid baby to bossy toddler is like at 4yo.   ohmy.gif  biggrin.gif


Sorry not skilled at quotes - but I suppose it is not good news? Because my bossy baby is approaching 4 and is now lovely?

#4 mrsgm

Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:39 PM

Ds2 was an absolute dream baby, never cried, ever, just fed, slept, laughed.  We hit 16 months and he honestly became an absolute nightmare.  A climbing, screeching, daredevil alien child. It also didnt help that i had health problems not long after it started and my mum had to move in for a few weeks and i couldnt pick him up for 6 weeks.  I have tried different ways to deal with it, but what sems ti be working at the moment is just a LOT of attention.  I am trying to keep him busy by helping me empty the dishwasher etc, and doing lots of puzzles and reading.  It was a huge shock and it has been a tough couple of months, but i am seeing glimpses of his previous calm, sweet nature re-emerging, so am hoping it is just a phase and he will grow out of it in the next few months.

#5 Mamabear2010

Posted 29 April 2012 - 07:17 AM

I've read that 18 months is the height of separation anxiety. Your toddler's change in behaviour could be linked with that.

My ds has been through stages where his tantrum throwing has intensified and then died away, then it returns again.

Have there been any changes lately that could have unsettled her?

#6 koalas

Posted 29 April 2012 - 07:38 AM

Same thing happened here and now she's a very high maintenance 5 year old who I'm sure is a drama llama

#7 Mpjp is feral

Posted 29 April 2012 - 07:53 AM

Sorry but this was my son too!!! I was a smug mother indeed, he slept beautifully, joyfully ate whatever veg I fed him, giggled,laughed and entertained himself happily with whatever was at hand. Then he changed. Overnight. A toddler from hell emerged. At the moment his 3 year old self is wrecking our house looking for something that he 'can't member what it is'. I find I have to get him out using his energy early every day. I also have to be vigilant about sleep and food.

#8 winkywonkeydonkey

Posted 29 April 2012 - 07:58 AM

what works for me is- get out of the house morning and afternoon. Also make sure they are getting enough sleep and eating well. bit hard when they are fussy with food though .

Also is she  cutting her molars? my dd has been extra feral lately because of teething.



#9 BornToLove

Posted 29 April 2012 - 08:01 AM

DD was a dream baby, slept well, ate well, could take her any and every where, hit all her milestones early.  

But I found the 12-18 months stage very difficult. Her sleep was pitiful, super picky with food, would throw the most epic of tantrums that would go on for 30-60 minutes.  She was diagnosed with ‘terrible twos’ at 13 months and it only got worse as time went on.  

She went through a lot during that time.  Dropped to one day sleep, started talking, dealing with some hardcore separation anxiety and we moved overseas.  But the one thing that made the whole period unbearable was her first molars and eye teeth.  Once she had both sets of those teeth, she was back to my happy bubbly baby... until her final molars started 6 months later...

#10 Natttmumm

Posted 29 April 2012 - 09:53 AM

One word....molars! DD2 was a placid sweet baby and at 16 months turned into a nightmare. Lasted on and off with teething then at 2 mostly placid again. It's a rough time but she I'll come good again

#11 Guest_Retro_Mumma_*

Posted 29 April 2012 - 10:10 AM

Thats my DS all over. He has his good days and his bad days but yes really chilled out little baby and now he is full.on like donkey kong.

You really dont appreciate how nice it is to have a little baby that is happy to sit on a rug and play with their toys until you have a tornado of a toddler!

#12 whydoibother

Posted 30 April 2012 - 11:32 AM

laughing2.gif I did do it sorry OP but yes I had quiet Noah he turned 2 and while still quieter than the other two terrors it was a shock.

#13 SylviaPlath

Posted 30 April 2012 - 11:47 AM

Oh dear, I am now very stressed out after reading this thread.

DS is 7 months, the most placid, sweetest, easy baby. Sleeps, eats, plays like a dream. Was convinced he would be like this forever. Lol. Really thought I hit the jackpot. (Well, I have I guess, currently.)

Damn it!

#14 ~shannon~

Posted 30 April 2012 - 11:48 AM

I'll put my hand up, as I too, have a terror toddler. She's 23 months now and she changed a few months ago from being a great baby (and great eater) and it's been hard work ever since. We have good days and bad days, but what bothers me the most is her fussy eating... she once ate rice crackers and cheese for dinner because the vegetables and chicken I'd made was not to her liking!
Dinner time is the noisiest time of day as she screams through all of dinner, until eventually yells out "cuddles!" to me to get her out of the high chair because she's had enough... but this is always when I'm only half way through eating, so I have to eat the rest with her on my lap. Aargh!

Last night I made chicken curry and rice and she ate the lot without any screaming - it was incredible! Afterwards DH and our older daughter said "Mum, you can make chicken curry and rice anytime!" LOL!


#15 ShoshieRu

Posted 30 April 2012 - 11:57 AM

Another one who had the calmest, happiest baby around. When all the other babies his age in my friendship group were being clingy and crying he would just be sitting there all dimpled and smiley.

He is turning three in July and is .... Whoa. A daredevil, noisy, favourite game is playing 'dwums' with any flat surface. Won't shut up either.

I just kick him out in the garden all day biggrin.gif

#16 winterlove

Posted 30 April 2012 - 07:26 PM

QUOTE (~shannon~ @ 30/04/2012, 11:48 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'll put my hand up, as I too, have a terror toddler. She's 23 months now and she changed a few months ago from being a great baby (and great eater) and it's been hard work ever since. We have good days and bad days, but what bothers me the most is her fussy eating... she once ate rice crackers and cheese for dinner because the vegetables and chicken I'd made was not to her liking!


Gosh, same at our place - but rather than screaming she swipes her hand across the tray to send anything she does not like on to the floor. In fact, today at lunch I gave her bread with avocado and cheese. She picked off the cheese and then I explained she had to eat the bread as well. I went to do some stuff in the kitchen and came back and the bread was gone. I praised her for eating all her lunch before I realised rather simply dropping on the ground like normal she had thrown it some distance so I could not see it.

#17 winterlove

Posted 30 April 2012 - 07:28 PM

[/quote]
I just kick him out in the garden all day biggrin.gif
[/quote]

roll2.gif

#18 ~shannon~

Posted 30 April 2012 - 11:24 PM

QUOTE (winterlove @ 30/04/2012, 07:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Gosh, same at our place - but rather than screaming she swipes her hand across the tray to send anything she does not like on to the floor. In fact, today at lunch I gave her bread with avocado and cheese. She picked off the cheese and then I explained she had to eat the bread as well. I went to do some stuff in the kitchen and came back and the bread was gone. I praised her for eating all her lunch before I realised rather simply dropping on the ground like normal she had thrown it some distance so I could not see it.

Yes... same here! I find myself saying "naughty baby!" all the time!  laughing2.gif  As if she cares! Lots of arms flailing about knocking food and drinks from my hands - she couldn't care less about the mess on the floor.
The other morning I said she could eat a snack in front of the TV as long as she sat on a mat with her big sister (so I could shake out the crumbs instead of having to get the vacuum out). Well, the tantrum about sitting on a mat lasted a good 10 minutes, but I stuck to my guns and wouldn't let her eat until she sat either on the mat or in her high chair (thought I would at least give her a choice!). Her big sister sat there happily eating while my toddler ran around the room screaming blue murder. Eventually it was my husband who convinced her to sit on the mat... while I sat rocking in the corner utterly exhausted.

What's that saying...? This too shall pass? I look forward to it.

#19 lozoodle

Posted 01 May 2012 - 10:05 AM

DD1 turned pretty feral around 18 months, but it peaked right around her second birthday (or maybe I noticed it more because I had a newborn baby as well by then and was exhausted). Shortly after that she came good.

Went through a whingey stage around 3, but not tantrums anymore. And now at 3 y 4m is an absolute delight. Hang in there, it doesn't last that long. Just ignore the tantrums and go about your day. Tantrums get boring when they don't have an audience original.gif

#20 EBeditor

Posted 01 May 2012 - 10:12 AM

So they do go through a whingey stage at 3? DD is over the tantrums but OMG the whinging and pouting is doing my head in!

#21 The Feral Plum

Posted 01 May 2012 - 10:29 AM

I had the opposite situation. DS was a demon baby who screamed and vomited around the clock. I looked like I'd been dragged through a hedge and had no short term memory. It seemed all around me were beautifully groomed mums with babies who cooed themselves to sleep.

Then he turned into Mr Mellow at 1. Remained mellow until around 2 years, 9 months. It was bliss.  Now he has completely transformed again. He has jump up and down, roll on floor screaming tantrums, and seems to be checking off a to-do list made up of every 'don't' he's ever heard... in the last few days alone he's drawn all over the floorboards, kicked the dog (in his thankfully nuetered testicles), climbed into the dishwasher and broken the drawers, deliberately pooed on my bed, snuck into the pantry and eaten MY secret chocolate stash, and attempted to cut my hair before I'd woken up.

I've been told he'll probably settle down again at 4.



#22 Freddieness

Posted 01 May 2012 - 11:19 AM

Oh joy! And here I was thinking it is a stage and won't last long. My beautiful easygoing placid 13mth old has suddenly turned into the demon child who is only happy climbing onto the back of the couches so mummy gets to couch hop from one to the other trying in vain to stop him killing himself! Or he is winging and whining and cracking it when something won't work the way he wants it to....then back to the climbing and tantruming when I don't let him dive off. He too has turned fussy with food, last night instead of chicken pesto pasta which is normally his favorite he had a slice of cheese two grapes a bite of bread and 3 spoons of yoghurt, the dog loved the pasta which he spat out and then threw over the side of his highchair (laughing as the dog ate it) I swore I would never give in and get another meal but now I am to afraid of the thousand wake ups a night due to hunger and him wanting boob for hours and hours. I am  now trying to stop the boob feeds because it is getting beyond a joke with tantrums lasting an hour when I won't let him stay attached while he sleeps. I just hope I can stay strong and not give in due to exhaustion. We are now going out morning and afternoon to try and stop this developing into the 'norm' he is such a charming smiling sweet little boy when we are out and I often get comments about him being such a happy boy (the ladies at the local IGA want me to leave him there for their entertainment, they just love him).....If only they knew what happens the moment we get home!!!
I just want my beautiful boy back!!

Ps, I am really sad about ending the breast feeds but it has changed from a feed to me becoming a dummy. Last night the tantrum stopped after 5min when I pulled him off after he fell asleep. So maybe we can continue until he is ready to stop.

Edited by freddieness, 01 May 2012 - 11:25 AM.


#23 stella80

Posted 01 May 2012 - 10:51 PM

Raising my hand on this one. My DD was just awesome and people always commented on how good a baby she was. Slept for hours, ate everything put in front of her and was a joy to be around. But ever since she hit 17 months everything mentioned here she does. She also does this thing when I'm cooking dinner where she will push herself between me and the cupboard and push me away from it. Really worried as she does this at the stove too (any suggestions on how to fix this as Im worries she will get hurt on day from hot food. not able to block off my kitchen either sad.gif) She just wants me to pick her up ALL the time and nothing will appease her. She wants everything and nothing at the same time. She is teething some big teeth at the moment so I will give her that. But feeling a bit discouraged that this may go one for many many more months sad.gif

#24 Doodalicious

Posted 02 May 2012 - 09:45 AM

This is so depressing, I was hoping DS19mths was going to come good soon but from the experiences of others it'll probably be a while.

He absolutely trashes my house, hits me and head butts me, yells, screams and throws things, and spits at me if he doesn't like the food I serve him. He used to eat *anything*!

#25 stella80

Posted 02 May 2012 - 11:23 PM

QUOTE (Splatterpuss81 @ 02/05/2012, 10:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is so depressing, I was hoping DS19mths was going to come good soon but from the experiences of others it'll probably be a while.

He absolutely trashes my house, hits me and head butts me, yells, screams and throws things, and spits at me if he doesn't like the food I serve him. He used to eat *anything*!



bbighug.gif  Sending you some happy thoughts sweet original.gif




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