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Unhealthy school canteen


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#251 JaneDoe2010

Posted 24 April 2012 - 06:58 PM

QUOTE (JECJEC @ 24/04/2012, 02:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Have you displined her at all for disobeying you?



QUOTE (tazcan @ 24/04/2012, 03:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I looked shocked (because I was), and said under no circumstances was she to go into my purse and take out money.


roll2.gif

QUOTE (Daisy Goat @ 24/04/2012, 03:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You have saidyou don't want to create issues with food and ultimately create food disorder.

OP- the horse has bolted and you are now about to slam the gate shut. Your daughter obviously already has food issues. She is begging money to buy foods you have banned. She has attempted to steal money once ( that you know of ,as you  just may not have caught her the other times) When a child, or adult, resorts to taking from others to get a food substance then the  food issue is already there.

You are not teaching her the "in moderation" aspect of  food. You are asking for the all or nothing concept.

Some people have willpower, some don't.  Some kids don't care if they have sugar some are frantic to access it. For your daughter to behave as she has to acquire these products is  a big "tell" that she has food issues.

And for the record those that sneak food and hoard it and eat it when those that judge are not in sight are Bulimic candidates.

Teach your daughter that you will allow everything in moderation. Let her have one slushy ( and the joy of buying it and consuming it with her peers which may be a big part of the  situation anyway) a week. But let her know that to have this slushy she will forgo other "treat food".

And as an aside  it is not the sugars that  are completely evil it is the colours and preservatives and artificial sweeteners you should be  screaming to have removed from the canteen


100% agree.

OP why won't you answer the question WHAT IS IN THE SLUSHIE???  Do you actually know?

#252 canuckmel

Posted 24 April 2012 - 07:04 PM

QUOTE (Daisy Goat @ 24/04/2012, 03:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You are not teaching her the "in moderation" aspect of  food. You are asking for the all or nothing concept.

And for the record those that sneak food and hoard it and eat it when those that judge are not in sight are Bulimic candidates.


Please pay attention to this, OP.

I have had an Eating Disorder as a teen, and teaching 'good food, bad food' breeds unhealthy eating patterns and causes guilt regarding eating which often can lead into bulimia patterns where she will punish herself for having 'bad' food.

Every food is OK......in moderation. My almost-6 year old loves cupcakes. She doesn't get cupcakes every day, but she does get one or two a week as a treat. It is not going to kill her or make her obese.

Edited by canuckmel, 24 April 2012 - 07:05 PM.


#253 FeralZombieMum

Posted 24 April 2012 - 08:50 PM

1) One of the two main issues here is not that the school canteen sells 'unhealthy' foods - it is that kids are sharing foods and money.

2) The second main issue is that your child is lying and stealing. You need to address this. If it's not slushies, then it will be something else - could be toys, or smiggle textas. Your child needs to be equipped with skills to deal with peer pressure because it will be an ongoing issue for the next 12+ years at school.

3) If you are expecting the canteen to change, then how will you control what the kids bring from home? Will you then insist the school ban kids from bringing any drinks or food in for the day?

4) Before you approach the school or canteen, can I suggest you volunteer and help out for the day? This will give you an appreciation of the hard work and chaotic environment they are in. Then ask yourself if your requests are reasonable. You might also find that your idea of a 'slushie' is not what is sold in the canteen - so it's possible it's not such an issue after all.

5) You can't expect an entire school to change because of your ideas on what your child should have.

6) The canteen provides a valuable service for parents, and just because you are happy for there to be none, doesn't mean that all other parents have this same belief.


QUOTE (tazcan @ 23/04/2012, 10:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you look up research on fructose and cardiovascular disease I think you will find that it does. Sugar is half fructose.

ETA- Here is just one link from Harvard medical school:
http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/...the-liver-heart

If fructose is an issue for your child, then you need to educate them on their food intolerance. Would you be requesting the canteen ban the fresh fruits and vegies that have higher levels of fructose?

#254 bakesgirls

Posted 24 April 2012 - 08:57 PM

QUOTE (tazcan @ 24/04/2012, 04:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Okay people I am not going to read the thread anymore.


Probably a good idea, seeing as you are not interested in anyone's ideas that don't fall into line with your own.

#255 4kidlets

Posted 24 April 2012 - 08:58 PM

QUOTE (SarDonik @ 24/04/2012, 05:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Kids don't know & don't care that they are drinking sugar free slushies - they are being introduced to and familiarised with food/drink that isn't typically healthy. Maybe they'll go to a fair or to the swimming pool where they sell sugary slushies & they will be inclined to have one, irrespective of whether it's got sugar in it or not. Schools should not sell slushies, with or without sugar period. There should be no chocolate, chips, coke etc etc If parents want their kids to eat junk then let them eat it at home in front of them.



So now it is not Ok for kids to have shaved ice and no sugar, no preservative flavouring - not because it is unhealthy but just because it resembles something else which is unhealthy?? blink.gif

#256 FeralZombieMum

Posted 24 April 2012 - 09:01 PM

QUOTE (4kidlets @ 24/04/2012, 08:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So now it is not Ok for kids to have shaved ice and no sugar, no preservative flavouring - not because it is unhealthy but just because it resembles something else which is unhealthy?? blink.gif

We should look at banning ice cubes. Might as well ban water as well.

biggrin.gif

#257 bakesgirls

Posted 24 April 2012 - 09:19 PM

QUOTE (ZombieMum @ 24/04/2012, 09:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We should look at banning ice cubes. Might as well ban water as well.

biggrin.gif


Yep, we can all live of fresh air and sunshine.  wink.gif

#258 Expelliarmus

Posted 24 April 2012 - 09:31 PM

I didn't get a finger bun today. It's a public holiday tomorrow.

I am going to die of finger bun deprivation before Thursday.

maybe I'll go down the servo and get a slushie.

#259 bakesgirls

Posted 24 April 2012 - 09:36 PM

QUOTE (howdo @ 24/04/2012, 09:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I didn't get a finger bun today. It's a public holiday tomorrow.

I am going to die of finger bun deprivation before Thursday.

maybe I'll go down the servo and get a slushie.


Bubblegum or grape flavour if they have it. Goes well with the finger buns they sometimes sell from the counter. biggrin.gif

#260 4kidlets

Posted 24 April 2012 - 10:01 PM

QUOTE (bakesgirls @ 24/04/2012, 10:19 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yep, we can all live of fresh air and sunshine.  wink.gif



Would solve the obesity problem tongue.gif

#261 FeralZombieMum

Posted 24 April 2012 - 10:42 PM

QUOTE (4kidlets @ 24/04/2012, 10:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Would solve the obesity problem tongue.gif

Yeah but that wouldn't help my kids as they are too skinny.

I once had a Paediatrician tell me to feed my child McDonalds to fatten her up. It was tempting to drop her off a happy meal for school lunches - and declare it was on advice of her Paed -  just to p*ss her teacher off, but alas the closest Maccas was too far to justify it.
roll2.gif

#262 gatheringpieces

Posted 25 April 2012 - 09:27 AM

*cries* I just want to know after all that what the darn slushies are!!!


#263 Majeix

Posted 25 April 2012 - 01:09 PM

QUOTE (SarDonik @ 24/04/2012, 04:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Kids don't know & don't care that they are drinking sugar free slushies - they are being introduced to and familiarised with food/drink that isn't typically healthy. Maybe they'll go to a fair or to the swimming pool where they sell sugary slushies & they will be inclined to have one, irrespective of whether it's got sugar in it or not. Schools should not sell slushies, with or without sugar period. There should be no chocolate, chips, coke etc etc If parents want their kids to eat junk then let them eat it at home in front of them.



By this logic I should also not make my kids frozen ice drinks and icy poles at home. I do it with milk and occasionly a little fruit juice. I often make icypoles that are purely milk or occasionly even watered down milk if we are running out of milk unsure.gif . I tell my older daughter that she can have öther ones" as a treat occasionly but these are ones are healthier so she can have them more often.  We dont'make a huge deal of oh those are terriblg you must have these and she loves milk flavoured icypoles and really anything cold (we also freeze oranges) but she does get they are more healthy then other types. Do you really think I should stop making them because I will be familarising her with unhealthy food types?

#264 FeralZombieMum

Posted 25 April 2012 - 01:28 PM

QUOTE (Majeix @ 25/04/2012, 01:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
By this logic I should also not make my kids frozen ice drinks and icy poles at home. I do it with milk and occasionly a little fruit juice. I often make icypoles that are purely milk or occasionly even watered down milk if we are running out of milk unsure.gif . I tell my older daughter that she can have öther ones" as a treat occasionly but these are ones are healthier so she can have them more often.  We dont'make a huge deal of oh those are terriblg you must have these and she loves milk flavoured icypoles and really anything cold (we also freeze oranges) but she does get they are more healthy then other types. Do you really think I should stop making them because I will be familarising her with unhealthy food types?

Of course you should stop! Can't you see the logic and common sense! ddoh.gif

Oh, and it just occurred to me that we should never give our kids panadol. We don't want them to become drug addicts, do we!?


#265 Froger

Posted 25 April 2012 - 01:43 PM

QUOTE (ZombieMum @ 24/04/2012, 10:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I once had a Paediatrician tell me to feed my child McDonalds to fatten her up.


I once got this same advice, but from a GP. wacko.gif

#266 fancie

Posted 25 April 2012 - 02:18 PM

QUOTE (gatheringpieces @ 25/04/2012, 10:27 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
*cries* I just want to know after all that what the darn slushies are!!!



Alas, just like the meaning of life, the ingredients of the slushie will forever remain a mystery.

#267 wombat

Posted 25 April 2012 - 04:29 PM

QUOTE
I once had a Paediatrician tell me to feed my child McDonalds to fatten her up.


I once had a paed tell me to let my daughter drink fizzy drink when she had a really bad gastro bug when she was 2.  He said he didn't care what she drank, as long as she drank, and sometimes it's the only thing kids can keep down. He was right.  It didn't have any adverse effects as far as I can tell, but I did get abused in the chemist by an old lady when I went in to get some more medication for DD.  According to old lady I was a terrible mother feeding that rot to DD (fair enough DD was guzzling Coke straight from the bottle, rather like a wino in the park) and she would die because of it.  She didn't though.  Funny that.

#268 SarDonik

Posted 26 April 2012 - 10:16 AM

QUOTE (ZombieMum @ 24/04/2012, 11:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yeah but that wouldn't help my kids as they are too skinny.

I once had a Pediatrician tell me to feed my child McDonalds to fatten her up. It was tempting to drop her off a happy meal for school lunches - and declare it was on advice of her Paed -  just to p*ss her teacher off, but alas the closest Maccas was too far to justify it.
roll2.gif


I doubt very much a Pediatrician told you to feed your kids Maccas to fatten them up. The food is so lacking in anything nutritious it will most likely result in your kids losing weight. There are much easier & cheaper & healthier ways to 'fatten' your kids up. In fact a journalist went on a Macdonalds diet for a fortnight and lost weight, so yeah I call bullsh*t. eexcite.gif

Edited by SarDonik, 26 April 2012 - 10:16 AM.


#269 SarDonik

Posted 26 April 2012 - 10:19 AM

QUOTE (Majeix @ 25/04/2012, 02:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
By this logic I should also not make my kids frozen ice drinks and icy poles at home. I do it with milk and occasionly a little fruit juice. I often make icypoles that are purely milk or occasionly even watered down milk if we are running out of milk unsure.gif . I tell my older daughter that she can have öther ones" as a treat occasionly but these are ones are healthier so she can have them more often.  We dont'make a huge deal of oh those are terriblg you must have these and she loves milk flavoured icypoles and really anything cold (we also freeze oranges) but she does get they are more healthy then other types. Do you really think I should stop making them because I will be familarising her with unhealthy food types?


I'm trying to address the issue we have in this country with childhood obesity. Something extreme needs to be done, doesn't it? What do you suggest, a couple of adverts telling parents not to feed their kids coco pops? Oh that will fix it...  rolleyes.gif

#270 ubermum

Posted 26 April 2012 - 10:35 AM

QUOTE (SarDonik @ 26/04/2012, 10:19 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm trying to address the issue we have in this country with childhood obesity. Something extreme needs to be done, doesn't it? What do you suggest, a couple of adverts telling parents not to feed their kids coco pops? Oh that will fix it...  rolleyes.gif

The thing is, childhood obesity is so much more complex than what kids eat from the canteen. There is a whole host of contributing factors.
*Portion sizes have increased across the board with every product. Chips that came in 25g bags when I was a kid, now only come in 50g bags.
*Screen time for kids has greatly increased. Parents are reluctant to let their children take off playing on their bikes and other similar outdoor activities as it is not seen as responsible and most of us have a degree of fear that something will happen to them if we don't supervise them at all times.
*A lot more children are being raised in households where both parents work and they work longer hours than my parents did when I was a child. It seems to be the only way that most people can service a mortgage these days. This leads to an over reliance on convenience and take-away foods just for time management.
*Most kids are driven to school rather than walking. This is not only due to convenience, but due to parents working and other lack of time issues.
*Parents themselves are bigger and have a distorted idea of body size, both for themselves and their children. Many overweight children are considered just a little chubby by their parents.

What kids are eating at the canteen is probably the least of anyone's problem.

#271 SarDonik

Posted 26 April 2012 - 10:49 AM

QUOTE (ubermum @ 26/04/2012, 10:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The thing is, childhood obesity is so much more complex than what kids eat from the canteen. There is a whole host of contributing factors.
*Portion sizes have increased across the board with every product. Chips that came in 25g bags when I was a kid, now only come in 50g bags.
*Screen time for kids has greatly increased. Parents are reluctant to let their children take off playing on their bikes and other similar outdoor activities as it is not seen as responsible and most of us have a degree of fear that something will happen to them if we don't supervise them at all times.
*A lot more children are being raised in households where both parents work and they work longer hours than my parents did when I was a child. It seems to be the only way that most people can service a mortgage these days. This leads to an over reliance on convenience and take-away foods just for time management.
*Most kids are driven to school rather than walking. This is not only due to convenience, but due to parents working and other lack of time issues.
*Parents themselves are bigger and have a distorted idea of body size, both for themselves and their children. Many overweight children are considered just a little chubby by their parents.

What kids are eating at the canteen is probably the least of anyone's problem.


Yes I agree with all of what you are saying and I guess banning all junk food from a canteen isn't really addressing the problem, kids need to be able to turn down junk food and opt for healthy food. Obviously the solution is for parents to take responsibility, better educate their children etc etc I'm not sure what the solution is to be honest. If we wanted to fix our obesity problem in 5 years, something extreme would need to be done. I have no idea what this would entail really. I don't really understand parents that regularly feed their kids junk food, is it ignorance or is it just apathy?

Edited by SarDonik, 26 April 2012 - 10:51 AM.


#272 balletmom4

Posted 26 April 2012 - 10:52 AM

QUOTE (SarDonik @ 26/04/2012, 10:16 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I doubt very much a Pediatrician told you to feed your kids Maccas to fatten them up. The food is so lacking in anything nutritious it will most likely result in your kids losing weight. There are much easier & cheaper & healthier ways to 'fatten' your kids up. In fact a journalist went on a Macdonalds diet for a fortnight and lost weight, so yeah I call bullsh*t. eexcite.gif



Actually, my DS was encouraged to eat macca's fries (plus a few other fattening foods) after he stopped eating completely following surgery for skin grafts (full thickness burns). He wouldnt eat ANYTHING, and was previously a great eater. So, we bought fries for him to eat, and he actually ate a few. It does happen, but I know it must be the exception rather than the rule.
Zombie Mums DD was diagnosed with Coeliac disease, weight loss and inability to gain weight is a issue with this disease, (which would have been undiagnosed when the info was given) so I'm guessing thats why she encouraged to try this apporach.

#273 MummaDiva

Posted 26 April 2012 - 11:05 AM

QUOTE (Julie3Girls @ 24/04/2012, 07:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So what is the next step ... do people think schools should be policing lunch boxes? Banning kids from eating anything unhealthy? Or maybe pantry inspections in homes, since parents are obviously not to be trusted.



Actually, one of the mothers in my DD1s class has done her reading help in class in the morning and then stuck around for lunch, just to inspect what other mothers are putting in the kids lunchboxes.  My lunchboxes seem to have passed OK but she has made formal complaints (to the principal) about one particular girl (who has some behavioural "issues" hitting / slapping this woman's daughter in particular).  This girl is given a packet of chips for lunch, a chocolate bar for recess and a 600ml coke to last the day.  A bit over the top on the part of both mothers.

QUOTE (Julie3Girls @ 24/04/2012, 07:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I agree that a better a solution, particularly in the OPs situation, is to actually limit the amount of money. There is no reason why a FYOS child needs so much money for school canteen.



I think the best solution to the OPs problem is for the OP to join the P&C or the canteen committee or whatever and go about making changes to the canteen menu in a constructive way.  Whinging from the sidelines won't do a thing.




#274 FeralZombieMum

Posted 26 April 2012 - 11:09 PM

QUOTE (SarDonik @ 26/04/2012, 10:16 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I doubt very much a Pediatrician told you to feed your kids Maccas to fatten them up. The food is so lacking in anything nutritious it will most likely result in your kids losing weight. There are much easier & cheaper & healthier ways to 'fatten' your kids up. In fact a journalist went on a Macdonalds diet for a fortnight and lost weight, so yeah I call bullsh*t. eexcite.gif

Doubt all you like. My DH, my DD and I were there and heard it straight from his mouth.

Of course - you know nothing of my DD's reasons for seeing a paed in the first place so I find it somewhat amusing that you've posted that there are easier ways to fatten up a child with ASD, that had sensory issues with food, and was also on daily medication (of which one of the side effects was it acted like an appetite suppressant). She's been getting her height and weight checked every 6 months for the last 10 years and was always an underweight child.
We didn't eat junk food - which is why I think he suggested it - he thought she might like the taste (as a lot of kids seem to), yet there was no enticing her to eat it because it tasted like cardboard to her. I did give it a few tries though.

Fortunately there are some EB members here that do think.

QUOTE (balletmom4 @ 26/04/2012, 10:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Zombie Mums DD was diagnosed with Coeliac disease, weight loss and inability to gain weight is a issue with this disease, (which would have been undiagnosed when the info was given) so I'm guessing thats why she encouraged to try this apporach.

I guess you're kind of close in a way. wink.gif - its my DD1 that sees the Paed every 6 months and she doesn't have the official Coeliac diagnosis (she had a positive blood test but biopsy was negative.) This Paed hasn't been very helpful when it came to her weight issues - we got more useful advice from a naturapath - and she's the one that insisted we see the GP for the Coeliac screening blood test. When she's gluten free, she gains the weight. biggrin.gif

It's my DD3 that has been officially diagnosed with Coeliac disease and she has never seen a Paed, but has seen a dietician - because they know a lot more about nutrition than Paeds do (which I thought would have been obvious to SarDonik. wink.gif )

QUOTE (wombat @ 25/04/2012, 04:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I once had a paed tell me to let my daughter drink fizzy drink when she had a really bad gastro bug when she was 2.  He said he didn't care what she drank, as long as she drank, and sometimes it's the only thing kids can keep down. He was right.  It didn't have any adverse effects as far as I can tell, but I did get abused in the chemist by an old lady when I went in to get some more medication for DD.  According to old lady I was a terrible mother feeding that rot to DD (fair enough DD was guzzling Coke straight from the bottle, rather like a wino in the park) and she would die because of it.  She didn't though.  Funny that.
When my DS was 18 months old, he was in hospital recovering from gastro and they gave him a fizzy drink! - I was horrified as I'd never given my kids fizzy drink at that age. It did the trick though!

Edited by ZombieMum, 26 April 2012 - 11:11 PM.


#275 Majeix

Posted 26 April 2012 - 11:32 PM

QUOTE (SarDonik @ 26/04/2012, 10:19 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm trying to address the issue we have in this country with childhood obesity. Something extreme needs to be done, doesn't it? What do you suggest, a couple of adverts telling parents not to feed their kids coco pops? Oh that will fix it...  rolleyes.gif


I understand that and I don't disagree that we have a problem and should try to fix it. I'm just questioning some of your ways of doing it. I belive that healthy food in canteens is important and if my school had a canteen I would be pushing for it offer healthy foods and expect treats to be limited and relatively healthy.  I also do not believe adverts about the evils of coco pops will fix anthing. Howeve as well as all these things I do not believe that offering a healthy version of "bad foods" is necessarily wrong either, or an essential part of combating childhood obesity. I can certainly see some logic in your idea. It's just I think a lot of valuable discussion about healthy eating can also come out of finding a healthy variation of something and I see no reason to deny my children a much loved and ery healthy treat just because it might in theory make them drawn to unhealthy Ivariations. Instead I would rather give them their healthy treat and tell them that they can have this more often because it is healthy and the other ones rarely because they are not so good for them.




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Looking for a classic name, or an unusual name? Our Baby Name Finder is for you, search or browse to refine your shortlist.

 
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