Jump to content

Should photos like Massoud Hossaini's Pulitzer Prize winner be published?
And should they win prizes?


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 Froger

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:03 PM

This is possibly the most horrific photo I have ever seen in my life. No one can look at this photo and not weep. If you haven't seen it yet be warned it contains terrible images of deceased children if you decide to google it.

I looked at it and wondered if it needed to be published, or is it just too horrific? It is up there with the photo of Phan Thị Kim Phúc in its horrific nature.

It is a terrible terrible photo and just devastating. What is the value of seeing this, or should we all know what is happening in such graphic detail so we really have a grasp of what is actually happening? And should it win such a prize?

I don't know. I am glad for war correspondants and investigative journalist, especially those  like Jo Frost, Anna Politkovskaya and of course John Pilger, without whom so may things would never be known and nothing would change. Perhaps we need to know and see these details to get outraged enough to do something. But my God, just so terrible to bear knowing about these things sometimes, when what can you do as an individual?

This photo has really affected me badly, I am shaking.

Edited by SarahM72, 18 April 2012 - 12:07 PM.


#2 BadCat

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:14 PM

I'm in two minds about photos like this.

On the one hand I do think they serve the purpose of bringing home the atrocities that people live with and opening our eyes to the world.

On the other hand I think there is a voyeuristic side to these sorts of images that is unhealthy.

As to whether it should win a prize?  Yes, I think that's entirely valid.

Edited by BadCat, 18 April 2012 - 12:19 PM.


#3 Futureself

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:15 PM

QUOTE (SarahM72 @ 18/04/2012, 12:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It is a terrible terrible photo and just devastating. What is the value of seeing this, or should we all know what is happening in such graphic detail so we really have a grasp of what is actually happening? And should it win such a prize?

Yes, it is devastating, it is horrific, and it should upset the viewer. It is also extraordinary. The courage and ability of photojournalists to bring such images to 'our' world should definitely be acknowledged with such a prize - the alternative is censorship of actual events because we deem some folks to 'precious' to be upset by them. The fact that you do compare it to Phan Thị Kim Phúc simply proves this point of their power, the ability to stay with us and perhaps teach us.
I am *glad* of such amazing people, such images. I deserve to know what the 30 second news story really means and there is no better way than 'seeing' it for myself. No matter how much that pains me.

#4 steppy

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:18 PM

I'm on the side of publishing. It's too easy to pretend this doesn't happen.

#5 Cat People

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:19 PM

I think they should come with a warning, which I don't think any of the main news websites have done.

The photo is very disturbing but I think it should be published.  Sometimes we need to see an imagine to make it real.

#6 Guest_~Karla~_*

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:19 PM

I think a lot of the time, we need to see something so confronting to really jolt us. It's too easy to sit here, on the other side of the world, and "forget" that they are real people, real children that are suffering in the news articles we read and watch on tv. It's horrifying, but it's really happening and I think we need to see photos like this in order for it to hit home.

I also think it deserved to win. Not only for what the photo stands for, but the actual photography is really quite good considering the circumstances.

I do agree about the voyeuristic element too. But I think the benefits of a photo like this outweigh those negatives.

#7 steppy

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:22 PM

On the voyeuristic aspect, I feel the photographer, the image and the other viewers are not responsible for how some people might view this image. Pre-photography, pre-television, people liked to go out to a good hanging or maybe even a drawing and quartering or a stoning.

#8 Fluster

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:24 PM

Yes.

A few weeks ago I stumbled upon a nightmare of a photo of an injured marine - I think from Iraq, I clicked away pretty quickly, it was extremely graphic.  Until I saw it, I'd really just forgotten about Iraq... all wars, really, I just got caught up in my own little world.  

Words are easily forgotten, and I can tune out the news like you wouldn't believe, but one image made me stop, look at my selfishness, the awful way I can speak to and treat people, and social injustices, and take the time to address my faults. You can't necessarily stop a war, but being confronted with human suffering really makes me think about the things, and attitudes, I can change.

#9 DEVOCEAN

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:25 PM

Yes it is a distressing photo, but without photos of these things when they happen it just makes it easier for people to deny they  ever happened.



#10 naards

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:25 PM

QUOTE (steppy @ 18/04/2012, 12:18 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm on the side of publishing. It's too easy to pretend this doesn't happen.


Absolutely agree.  I am very shaken by it too but it is truly a representation of what is happening and I think it is important for people to recognise it.  So so sad!!!  sad.gif

#11 Froger

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:37 PM

One thing I didn't think of until now, is that Massoud of course was also there at the time of the blast. He also is a victim, not just a voyeuristic onlooker. Actually I think that makes a difference.

#12 Guest_holy_j_*

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:38 PM

Yes absolutely it should be published and a prize is warranted. We get such a censored view of what really happens in many countries compared to other places in the world. It's easy to distance yourself from the realities, press attention to such photos help the rest of the world to see that it is real, that they are people just like us and the suffering they have to endure.

I was just looking at pictures on an arabic page last night, pictures of an African man in the throes of starvation reaching out, an emaciated african child drinking from a filthy pool of water, a starving mother burying her emaciated child, unarmed palestinians standing up to armed IDF guards, children who were the victims of attacks both military and suciide bombing.

The fact that it has evoked such a strong reaction in you OP speaks volumes.

#13 Razman

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:44 PM

Its a horribly graphic awful photo of an absolutely tragic event. Like OP the photo left me shaking and upset. I wish I hadn't seen it. Its at the top of the SMH website.

But I do think it should be published, maybe not on the front page of the website and definitely with a warning, but published nevertheless. Because it does convey the impact of the terror and misery imposed on innocent people in a way words never will.

And I do think it deserves the award.

#14 findingada

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:50 PM

I think photos like this need to be published. Like others have mentioned, I think people become a bit too detached from the horrors of what is going on in the world today. How often do you skim over news articles about another suicide bomber? I know I stopped reading out what is happening in Afghanistan a long time ago. Photos like this remind me that the suffering has not stopped and the horror is on-going. We need to feel and be moved by what is really going on otherwise we are living a life lost in the fictional constructions of others.

#15 MahnaMahna

Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:05 PM

Absolutely it should be published. It is too easy for us (by us I mean those not living, experiencing or witnessing these events) to forgot that this happens in our world, that people suffer from events like this every single day.

I think there should be a warning attached to the photo and that it shouldn't be splashed on front pages of newspapers or website where people do not get a choice at seeing it, but I think it is important that we do not shield ourselves from these things and that we understand the gravity of situations like this.

I don't want to live with rose coloured glasses on. I am forever grateful for the life I live, but I also want to have my eyes wide open to the fact that not everyone in this world is so lucky. I may not be able to do much to help but I won't live in ignorance.

#16 Canberra Chick

Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:10 PM

yes it should be published - and the girl in the centre is what makes it. The bright colours (so cheerful, as if they don't belong there) and her screaming reaction to the horror around her jolts the mind.

We hear stories on the news of another 30 dead in Kabul, Baghdad etc and it goes in one ear and out the other. Humans are visual creatures and this says far more than a worthy Lateline 5 minute feature.

#17 Snorlax

Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:55 PM

I think it is incredibly disturbing & that it should be published!

I know people who still say they don't watch/read the news because they find it too disturbing, I wonder how can things ever change if we're censoring & sheltering ourselves from the painful realities that other people in the world endure!?!

I did read that whilst he was there & was injured that people around him were calling for his help but he took photos instead. Now he may well not have been able to help those people & by taking such photos he has probably helped future generations there to take action to 'fix' this situation. But I can't deny that when I read that I felt a little cold.



#18 Expelliarmus

Posted 18 April 2012 - 02:00 PM

I think they should be. Before images of war like this were published (historically the Vietnam war), war was romanticised.

We don't need to go back there.

#19 meljb

Posted 18 April 2012 - 02:26 PM

OP I had similar thoughts when I saw the image this morning. It is very disturbing. I came to the conclusion that we definitely need images like this published, otherwise we forget the reality of what is going on and we also lose some of the historical record. I remember the photos we saw in high school history and how they brought to life what we were studying and reminded us that we were looking at real people and real events. I've used images like this since in my own teaching and, as the cliche says, a picture is worth a thousand words.

#20 matt1972

Posted 18 April 2012 - 08:34 PM

QUOTE (Belle~Vie @ 18/04/2012, 01:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think it is incredibly disturbing & that it should be published!

I know people who still say they don't watch/read the news because they find it too disturbing, I wonder how can things ever change if we're censoring & sheltering ourselves from the painful realities that other people in the world endure!?!

I did read that whilst he was there & was injured that people around him were calling for his help but he took photos instead. Now he may well not have been able to help those people & by taking such photos he has probably helped future generations there to take action to 'fix' this situation. But I can't deny that when I read that I felt a little cold.


That's really the only problem I have with it. After googling the image and reading that he took a bunch of photos then took off to upload the photos to potential publishers it kind of doesn't sit well with me.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

Christina Aguilera announces daughter's name

Christina Aguilera and her fiance, Matt Rutler, have welcomed their daughter into the world.

Couple caught in surrogacy crackdown

An Australian couple caught up in Thailand's surrogacy crackdown have said many parents are distraught and facing dire financial difficulties as are they are unable to bring their surrogate-born babies home.

'Tired' mum dies of undiagnosed diabetes

New mum Nicky Rigby thought her exhaustion was due to the demands of looking after her baby. But the 26-year-old was seriously ill with diabetes, and died due to her condition not being diagnosed.

5 co-sleeping myths busted

In case you are co-sleeping with your baby, and all the ?helpful? advice from others is sending you down the slippery slope of self-doubt, let?s bust a few myths on the topic.

When pregnancy takes you down memory lane

One mum-to-be discovers pregnancy hormones can give rise to some surprising emotions.

What?s your love language?

The secret to making your partner feel special is to know which language of love they favour ? and it?s the same for your kids, too.

Returning to exercise after a caesarean

I had my daughter four months ago via caesarean, and I want to get back into exercise. What are some good first steps I can take?

20 signs of a great relationship

The secret to a perfect relationship is admitting you are wrong after an argument, five kisses a day and sex twice a week, a new survey suggests.

Video: emotional 60-second Robin Williams tribute

Take a minute to remember some of the greatest films of your childhood ... and have a few tissues close at hand.

The realities of escaping domestic violence

?Why doesn?t she just leave?? is the common question people ask when trying to understand domestic violence. For many, leaving the relationship is far from straightforward.

Home truths: the DIY dos and don'ts

A professional renovator gives advice on which jobs you should do yourself, and which you should outsource.

Parenting lessons I?ve yet to learn

Instead of writing about the stuff I do know since becoming a mum, I thought I'd share some of the things I don't. These are the lessons that motherhood hasn't taught me.

Will I be wrecked 'down there' after birth?

Did you worry about how you would look "down there" after giving birth? This mum-to-be found plenty of women willing to share their knowledge.

The new weekend playgroup for working mums

Playgroups are great for kids and parents alike - but the downside is that they often meet during the week, leaving working mums out of the loop.

Letting your toddler be the boss at bedtime

Sick of spending hours trying to get your toddler to sleep? These experts say giving your child more of a say at bedtime might be the answer.

7 mistakes old hands make with new babies

As I sat across the table from my friend ? me, a seasoned mother of three; her, a brand new mum ? I thought of all the mistakes an old-hand parent can make when visiting a newborn baby.

Ezra's tragic death not in vain, mum says

Little Ezra was a "Harry Houdini" who loved trying to escape the family home. Now, after his tragic death, his parents are doing what they can to help others.

Consulting 'Dr Google' when you're pregnant

We're all guilty of turning to the internet for a quick answer when we need medical advice, but Dr Google should be approached with caution - especially when you're pregnant.

Win back some precious time and get FREE coupons

Membership to eBay's Bubs? Corner is free and includes a $10 coupon to spend on nappies each month - a win for multitasking mums!

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Win back some precious time and get FREE coupons

Membership to eBay's Bubs? Corner is free and includes a $10 coupon to spend on nappies each month - a win for multitasking mums!

Do you suffer from Precious Firstborn Syndrome?

Testing ?no more tears? shampoo in your own eyes, warming cucumber sticks so they're not cold straight from the fridge, waking a sleeping baby to check they?re still breathing: these are all symptoms of Precious Firstborn Syndrome.

Ezra's tragic death not in vain, mum says

Little Ezra was a "Harry Houdini" who loved trying to escape the family home. Now, after his tragic death, his parents are doing what they can to help others.

7 mistakes old hands make with new babies

As I sat across the table from my friend ? me, a seasoned mother of three; her, a brand new mum ? I thought of all the mistakes an old-hand parent can make when visiting a newborn baby.

Video: When adults act like children

Ever wondered what would happen if adults were allowed to act like children? This dad's hilarious video clip will give you an idea of what life would be like.

Mums hit hardest as flu cases skyrocket

The number of confirmed cases of influenza in Australia has doubled the number for the same time last year - and women are 25 per cent more likely to get it.

The mum who had four babies in nine months

Feeling exhausted due to the demands of caring for a baby? Imagine the life of this mum, who gave birth to three boys and one girl in just nine months.

Everything baby at Big W

Lowest prices on everything baby, only at Big W. Sale starts August 4 and ends August 20 2014.

Smiggle is painting the town red!

We have 3 Red Smiggle prize packs to give away! Enter by posting a photo of something red to your Instagram.

Mum gives birth at school

Whether they're out of favour traditional names, or the parents were a little creative, here are the least popular names of 2013.

Personalised baby gifts

We've scoured the internet to find gorgeous personalised keepsakes and nursery decor to record baby name and dates. They make great gifts for christenings, name days and birthdays! (All prices in AU.)

 

Mind, body, beauty, life

Making time for me

We look at your wellbeing, covering health, relationships, beauty and fashion, mind and body.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.