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Child driving car alone


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#51 *LucyE*

Posted 17 April 2012 - 07:52 PM

QUOTE
This is one of those weird EB times where in this thread most people are happy to let a 7yo drive but tomorrow there will a thread on not letting your 18yo catch a bus because it is too dangerous

Nah, wait for the carseats police tongue.gif

OP, how tall and heavy was this 7yr old?  We're they in an appropriate booster seat with anti submarine-ing features?  Did the car have air bags?  Were the rear seats filled with younger children?

I don't think I'm EBT either.

(disclaimer - I'm a helicopter parent and my 8yr old is still in a booster)

#52 Nofliesonme

Posted 17 April 2012 - 07:58 PM

Completely normal, we lived on a property and miss 6 would other drive car if raining or motorbike to gate.


#53 Nofliesonme

Posted 17 April 2012 - 08:00 PM

Should add my child didn't need to cross  the road and the vehicle never left the property. She usually walked but on occasion.....rarely would take the old ute.

#54 Nofliesonme

Posted 17 April 2012 - 08:07 PM

Just read the replies I think it's normal, the property we were on was 7000 acres. The property owner knew our daughter was there at set hours etc. Jasmine can ride motorbikes, drive the tractor. People are so against it, but what about those 2 little kids that saved their granddads life because they joined forces and got help a fair distance away. I believe don't quote me the were 4&7 or something similar.....

#55 Bart.

Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:32 PM

Except for the laziness factor, I have no problem with it.  I was raised semi-rural and there were many kids driving up and down their driveways at a very young age.  My sister was nine when she started driving our Datsun 120Y on our grandparent's property and tried to teach me when I was 12.

With the child the OP is referring to, there's a chance he was driving supervised for a while until the parents considered him capable of handling the vehicle without them.  He's earned their trust.  I know this doesn't necessarily help if something unexpected happens but they've judged the risk factors and decided them minimal.

Edited by Bartholomew, 17 April 2012 - 09:33 PM.


#56 Guest_NinjahAlpaca_*

Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:42 PM

So this is a 400m - 500m trip and there's heavy earthmoving equipment using the same path?  The kid is 7 years old and driving a car?

OVER MY DEAD AND ROTTING CORPSE!

I'm not saying there isn't a situation for under-aged drivers to drive on their own private property, I'm sure there is, but this is absolutely insane!



#57 BlondieUK

Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:47 PM

STBG - I think we can all accept that there are different lifestyles and transport issues in rural Australia than in urban areas.

However - a child that age does not have the the appropriate strength or reflexes to deal with a vehicle that size should something untoward occur, even if they are tall for their age. In the situation described by the OP, there appears to be no good reason for the child to be driving a car. 400-500 metres is not far, and when the road is shared by heavy vehicles, then it sounds like an accident waiting to happen.

If the circumstances were different (ie. more rural location; bigger property etc etc) then some of your points would make sense. Right now they have a bit of a know-it-all taint. Especially when the child in question is only 7.

#58 Tree Sage

Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:55 PM

Having grown up in a rural area and with family still living on propertys where their nearest bordering property is 2 hours drive away, I can recall as a child hearing of all the other children who were permitted to drive cars, tractors, motorbikes, working heavy machinery  etc DYING.

A harsh truth is there are more child accidents resulting in death in the country because of the unnecessary risks taken.
As a result of being brought up with freinds dying from accidents, or losing their leg, no one in my family has taught their children to drive at such an early age unsupervised.Even the family who still live on million acre properties.

Its ridiculous and not required.


Edited by rjflc69, 18 April 2012 - 09:25 AM.
Edit to remove personal attack


#59 Soontobegran

Posted 17 April 2012 - 11:01 PM

QUOTE (BlondieUK @ 17/04/2012, 10:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
STBG - I think we can all accept that there are different lifestyles and transport issues in rural Australia than in urban areas.

However - a child that age does not have the the appropriate strength or reflexes to deal with a vehicle that size should something untoward occur, even if they are tall for their age. In the situation described by the OP, there appears to be no good reason for the child to be driving a car. 400-500 metres is not far, and when the road is shared by heavy vehicles, then it sounds like an accident waiting to happen.

If the circumstances were different (ie. more rural location; bigger property etc etc) then some of your points would make sense. Right now they have a bit of a know-it-all taint. Especially when the child in question is only 7.


Why am I getting a lecture here! It isn't my child and I will repeat once again that I would NOT allow my children to do this.....it doesn't stop the fact that it is common practice in the country, my DH's relatives are on farms and their kids do it and have done so for years!

#60 BlondieUK

Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:15 AM

I agree that by saying "it's the country way" that it normalises and ok's the behaviour. It's not 'normal' for a 7 year old on a non-rural property to drive a car 400-500metres on the kind of track that the OP describes. That's why your posts are objectionable, STBG, not because you say it's ok for your own kids.



#61 KylieferalMin0gue

Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:33 AM

I can't believe how many people think that it is ok for a 7 year old to drive a car.  I understand that it is just up and down a driveway, but cars are like weapons and should be operated with caution, and I certainly don't think a 7 year old could operate a car with the right amount of caution required.  (I understand that many adults are completely bad drivers too and should not be on the road)

Over my dead body would any child of mine be driving a car until they are of at least legal age.

#62 Feralishous

Posted 18 April 2012 - 02:41 AM

QUOTE (BlondieUK @ 17/04/2012, 11:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I agree that by saying "it's the country way" that it normalises and ok's the behaviour. It's not 'normal' for a 7 year old on a non-rural property to drive a car 400-500metres on the kind of track that the OP describes. That's why your posts are objectionable, STBG, not because you say it's ok for your own kids.

+1

#63 Floki

Posted 18 April 2012 - 07:41 AM

I wouldn't allow either of my kids to do it even if we lived rurally. It is a 500m walk. No wonder there is a weight problem when 7r olds can't even do that.



#64 I'm Batman

Posted 18 April 2012 - 08:39 AM

Hmmm what do I think?

I think it's not illegal, its private property and therefore their business.  



#65 Soontobegran

Posted 18 April 2012 - 08:57 AM

QUOTE (BlondieUK @ 18/04/2012, 01:15 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I agree that by saying "it's the country way" that it normalises and ok's the behaviour. It's not 'normal' for a 7 year old on a non-rural property to drive a car 400-500metres on the kind of track that the OP describes. That's why your posts are objectionable, STBG, not because you say it's ok for your own kids.



So acknowleding it happens and that it happens often means I am approving of it?

For one last time, I don't think this behaviour is OK not for my kids and not for the kid the OP mentioned.


#66 rjflc69

Posted 18 April 2012 - 09:29 AM

I have edited a post that was a personal attack and removed others that were quoting this post.  

Thanks
Fiona
Moderator

#67 Guest_tigerdog_*

Posted 18 April 2012 - 09:43 AM

QUOTE
I wouldn't let mine ride a quad bike alone that young - too unstable, I have rolled one.


I wouldn't either, a friend of a friend of mine was killed on one.  I'd let my kids ride a normal 2-wheeler motorbike but not a quad bike at all.

#68 BlondieUK

Posted 18 April 2012 - 07:02 PM

STBG - I never said that you think it's ok for your kids: I am saying that I (and others) find your opinion to normalise the behaviour because you say that it's normal or common in rural areas. Understand?



#69 item

Posted 18 April 2012 - 07:09 PM

Haven't read all the replies, but I grew up in a country town and I was taught to drive around age 7.  Mainly because we did A LOT of camping in  reasonably remote areas - Mum & Dad wanted to be sure I could drive to the nearest road/farm for help if it was required.  

I don't think it's weird that he can and does drive, I do think it's weird he drives just 500m instead of walking/riding.

#70 BlondieUK

Posted 18 April 2012 - 07:30 PM

Item - but you were taught to drive for emergencies, right? Not to drive 400-500m in a non rural-area every school day to cross the road, right?

#71 Soontobegran

Posted 18 April 2012 - 07:46 PM

QUOTE (BlondieUK @ 18/04/2012, 07:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
STBG - I never said that you think it's ok for your kids: I am saying that I (and others) find your opinion to normalise the behaviour because you say that it's normal or common in rural areas. Understand?



TBH no I do not understand how me saying that I know this practice occurs in the country is me normalising the behaviour?

I know lots of things happen that I don't approve of, I guess you do too. Does that mean you never discuss these things or acknowledge that they occur?
Aside from that if you have actually read the entire thread instead of just focusing on what I have said you will find many 'real' country people who also say that it is 'common practice' and they don't think it is an issue...unlike myself!


#72 Indi

Posted 18 April 2012 - 10:25 PM

QUOTE (item @ 18/04/2012, 07:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't think it's weird that he can and does drive, I do think it's weird he drives just 500m instead of walking/riding.

This.

DD1 can drive - she is 8.  She often drives the farm ute around the paddock while DH or I feed out the hay.  She could easily drive up the driveway but doesn't, she would walk or ride a bike that distance.

#73 kadoodle

Posted 18 April 2012 - 11:00 PM

QUOTE (Put lipstick on it @ 17/04/2012, 11:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
He has to drive 500 meters? What - are his legs painted on?


This.  DHand I both learned to drive on family farms as primary schoolers.  But 500m is walking/pushie distance.  If there are heavy vehicles using the road the parents need to A) cut a personal track on their property for him to walk/ride on or B) drive him themselves.

No wonder there is an obesity crisis out bush!




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