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Parents drinking at school function
Is it ok?


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#301 Dionysus

Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:57 AM

Sarah, most ppl are asking you to explain why ppl would feel excluded if alcohol was served at a school function.

You are saying that in a public school more ppl would feel excluded (don't agree, but whatever)

But, what makes them feel excluded in the first place?  Why would they not feel welcome?

'Cos more public school parents are alcoholic and would feel bullied?    huh.gif

#302 Guest_~Karla~_*

Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:59 AM

Would anyone here seriously not go to a school event just because there might be someone having one or two alcoholic drinks?

I could understand feeling excluded by alcohol if there was a rule that you HAD to have an alcoholic drink before you were allowed to participate, but to feel excluded by the mere presence of alcohol? Really?

#303 BadCat

Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:10 AM

QUOTE (~Karla~ @ 13/04/2012, 09:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Would anyone here seriously not go to a school event just because there might be someone having one or two alcoholic drinks?


Yes.  I'm sure a couple of people upthread said exactly that.

So far I haven't seen one single argument in favour of prohibiiting alcohol at a school function that makes any sense to me.


#304 Guest_~Karla~_*

Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:18 AM

QUOTE (BadCat @ 13/04/2012, 10:10 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yes.  I'm sure a couple of people upthread said exactly that.

So far I haven't seen one single argument in favour of prohibiiting alcohol at a school function that makes any sense to me.


Oh, I must have missed that. I can't imagine that sort of extremist attitude is particularly common though...

#305 Jane Jetson

Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:20 AM

Wow, I'm learning a lot from this thread.

Alcoholism is now defined as not caring if a school event is alcohol-free or not, and can be identified by people objecting to directives from people they don't know on the Internet.

"Want," "need" and "oh okay, don't mind if I do" are now synonyms, given the number of people still claiming that we desperately need a glass of wine to get through a school event if we accept the presence of alcohol at all.

The presence of a substance not consumed by others constitutes bullying and exclusion. I will thus stand up and complain about my victimhood next time there is avocado or Coke or anything with mushrooms served because I don't like those.

Working class people will feel excluded if there's alcohol present. Apparently. I don't understand this one either. I grew up working class and went to public school, and am now middle and send the kids to Catholic school with all us lushes, so do I feel excluded or not? I'm very confused.  tongue.gif

#306 Melidia

Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:57 AM

QUOTE
Yep. Lots. The "think as I think or there's something wrong with you" attitude is mostly coming from you.

You've also assumed that any clinical understanding of alcoholism precludes any direct experience. I've seen it too growing up, and it's quite far removed from what we're talking about here: having one glass of wine at a school function.

Again, it's not a case of "what's wrong with ya". It's a case of you deciding that you should get to make the rules about what everybody else does, and hysterically declaring us alcoholics because we simply don't agree with your stance.

For the record, I don't need a drink to get through a school function. Nobody here has said they do, apart from a couple of people who were clearly joking.


You know, there is nowhere in this thread that I have said that.  I don't expect people to think the same way I do.  I DO expect those who are undiagnosed alcoholics to react they way they have in this thread though.

I do understand alcoholism, both in the clinical sense and the personal sense.  The abject denial of the psychology of the alcoholic seen here is a huge sign that alcoholism is a poorly understood disease by the majority - still.  Having a couple of wines at a school function does not make you an alcoholic.  I agree with that.  It's the couple here, couple there, couple everywhere, to the point that you CANNOT attend a school function, or anything else for that matter, without a few under your belt, or bringing a bottle for social lubrication, that is pointing people in the direction of the alcoholic path.  People who are so damned SENSITIVE about the idea that someone observes their behaviour as being potentially alcoholic need to do some self-examination.  However, it is far easier to condemn someone who points it out than look at yourself, isn't it.

I don't get to make the rules about everyone else's drinking, and haven't attempted to.  However, I do have an opinion, which is that there is a time and a place for alcohol consumption and I really don't believe a school function is the place.  I am as entitled to express that opinion as anyone else here, whether you like it or not.

As for the 'jokes', they are in very poor taste.  Anyone who has lived through alcoholism would know that.

#307 FeralFerretOfDoom

Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:06 AM

QUOTE (RoxieRouge @ 12/04/2012, 10:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The alcoholic behaviour I am referring to is the belief that if you don't do as they do, or think as they think, then there is something wrong with YOU.  There is plenty of that in this thread.


Yes, an alcoholic may well have the attitude that you describe.

But equally, so may someone who has been told something they consider hysterical and/or irrational - such as; you are not allowed to drink coffee because it will set a bad example for the children and exclude the people who don't drink coffee.

Now, I may or may not want to have a coffee - in fact I may dislike hot drinks in general, but if someone came out and said something like that, I would react in a somewhat "WTF are you thinking" way.

#308 Aquitaine

Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:08 AM

QUOTE (RoxieRouge @ 13/04/2012, 10:57 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I DO expect those who are undiagnosed alcoholics to react they way they have in this thread though.


There are undiagnosed alcoholics in this thread? As evidenced by them not being upset about alcohol at school events? Oh boy.

#309 Expelliarmus

Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:16 AM

I don't drink alcohol (not ever, never had a drop in my entire life) and hold the same view that is being described as that held by those who are clearly 'undiagnosed alcoholics' ...

Did you know that it is possible to be seen with a drink in your hand at every social function - including among an entire family who do not drink alcohol - to drink pretty much constantly and yet NOT tick the boxes required to diagnose you as an alcoholic?

My brother is an alcoholic. I know it, my sister knows it, I think mum even knows it deep down although wouldn't admit it, but he has never been identified as one. Because there are some boxes he doesn't tick. He proudly states, with Jacks in hand that he's not an alcoholic.

Yet he can't go a day without a drink.

Figure that one out.



#310 threelittlegems

Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:26 AM

QUOTE (RoxieRouge @ 13/04/2012, 10:57 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I DO expect those who are undiagnosed alcoholics to react they way they have in this thread though.

I do understand alcoholism, both in the clinical sense and the personal sense.  The abject denial of the psychology of the alcoholic seen here is a huge sign that alcoholism is a poorly understood disease by the majority - still.  Having a couple of wines at a school function does not make you an alcoholic.  I agree with that.  It's the couple here, couple there, couple everywhere, to the point that you CANNOT attend a school function, or anything else for that matter, without a few under your belt, or bringing a bottle for social lubrication, that is pointing people in the direction of the alcoholic path.  People who are so damned SENSITIVE about the idea that someone observes their behaviour as being potentially alcoholic need to do some self-examination.  However, it is far easier to condemn someone who points it out than look at yourself, isn't it.


Isn't there a banging head against brick wall emotion somewhere?

RR, you may understand alcoholism, but you sure as hell don't understand 'normal' drinking. Your judgement is clouded by your experiences.

Can someone please call the APA and tell them to add - 'wants to have a glass of wine at school functions' to the alcoholic checklist. Put it on the top of the list, because if ticked yes, the subject is definitely an alcoholic. No need for any further questions.

Edited by threelittlegems, 13 April 2012 - 11:31 AM.


#311 Jane Jetson

Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:35 AM

QUOTE (RoxieRouge @ 13/04/2012, 10:57 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I do understand alcoholism, both in the clinical sense and the personal sense.  The abject denial of the psychology of the alcoholic seen here is a huge sign that alcoholism is a poorly understood disease by the majority - still.  Having a couple of wines at a school function does not make you an alcoholic.  I agree with that.  It's the couple here, couple there, couple everywhere, to the point that you CANNOT attend a school function, or anything else for that matter, without a few under your belt, or bringing a bottle for social lubrication, that is pointing people in the direction of the alcoholic path.  People who are so damned SENSITIVE about the idea that someone observes their behaviour as being potentially alcoholic need to do some self-examination.  However, it is far easier to condemn someone who points it out than look at yourself, isn't it.


Alcoholism is defined as a physical dependence on alcohol via daily drinking to the point where cessation would cause withdrawal symptoms. No physical dependence may mean pre-alcoholism, it may mean harmful or hazardous drinking in the long or short term and it may mean a bingeing problem, all of which are not alcoholism. This does not mean they are not problematic.

Nobody here is displaying alcoholic behaviour by not caring if somebody else has a drink at a social function or not.

I have just "had a look at myself" as you suggest and come to the conclusion that half a dozen glasses of wine a year probably mean I'm in the clear.

#312 threelittlegems

Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:41 AM

In any case RR, your definition of 'alcoholic' means that Howdo is an alcoholic.


















I rest my case.



Edited by threelittlegems, 13 April 2012 - 11:41 AM.


#313 Liv_FERAL_sh

Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:48 AM

Undiagnosed alcoholic because I don't think some parents having a beer at a school picnic will bring about the next apocalypse...now THAT little gem is going straight in my bag of WTF!!!

#314 BetteBoop

Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:55 AM

I went to my first school event last month. They had a bar even though the event only went for 3 hours.

TBH I was surprised that alcohol was allowed and that people wanted to drink. But if that's what people want to do and the school allows it, then fine by me.  

QUOTE (fancie @ 11/04/2012, 08:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
oh dear.

Get invited out much?


This made me descend into great guffaws of laughter complete with unladylike snorting - and I'm at work.

Thanks fancie. My colleagues probably think I'm p*ssed again.

QUOTE (RoxieRouge @ 12/04/2012, 10:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you had a relatively decent level of comprehension, you would already understand that it isn't the drinking I am referring to.  It is in fact the excessive "whats wrong with ya?!?!?!" posts that are coming from those who think drinking at school functions, indeed NEEDING a drink to get through a school function is 'normal'.  

The alcoholic behaviour I am referring to is the belief that if you don't do as they do, or think as they think, then there is something wrong with YOU.  There is plenty of that in this thread.

Having grown up with alcoholism I understand all too well what alcoholic behaviour is.  Far better than someone whose sole understanding comes from a DSM-IV manual I suspect.


There is no definition of alcoholism that applies to the behaviour you're suggesting. A difference of opinion doesn't imply mental illness or dysfunctional thought processes.  

It could be that when you grow up watching a particular type of behaviour, you tend to look for it. It may not mean it exists everywhere.



#315 BadCat

Posted 13 April 2012 - 12:20 PM

QUOTE
I DO expect those who are undiagnosed alcoholics to react they way they have in this thread though.


Once again, nobody is seriously suggesting that they can't get through a school function without some booze.  A few people joked about it.

Being in favour of people making their own decision whether to have a wine with their meal is not any sort of sign of being alcoholic. It is more a sign of acceptance that people should be allowed to run their own lives without reference to my personal choices.

#316 Mumsyto2

Posted 13 April 2012 - 12:42 PM

QUOTE (FrogIsAFrogIsAFrog @ 13/04/2012, 08:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Several weeks ago we attended a sleep-over at school which was a "family event".  DH and I didn't bring drinks and I was surprised at how many parents either didn't get the several memos about this, or blatantly disregarded it.  Despite this, there were no shenanigans but I was a little disappointed that these events can't just be all about the kids, and not our desire for a relaxing drink.

No wonder.  If I was made to sleep in a hall or what not with a school load of kids I would also require a 'relaxing drink'. Totally justified. Note, that would probably mean two drinks during the entire course of the evening/night and I would in no way be lurching around in bushes exhibiting the behaviour you describe below.  Actually not allowing me to have one or two in this situation would be exclusionary as there would be no way I would be sleeping in a school overnight crammed with god knows how many other adults and kids without it so I would not attend.  It sounds like something one would have to endure in the event of a crisis (emergency bushfire/flood accom or something) rather than something to do for fun which is 'all about the kids' so I am in no way surprised people ignored notes and took BYO in order to survive the ordeal if they felt it was expected they participate for the sake of 'school community'.

QUOTE (FrogIsAFrogIsAFrog @ 13/04/2012, 08:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A few years ago, there were several children lost and crying on school grounds in the dark, not being able to find their parents because their parents had nicked off to smoke in the bushes (drunk).  One child was locked in the toilet, hysterical because they couldn't operate the lock and their parent could not be found.  Children were seen drinking left over alcohol in styrene cups because adults had left them laying around and not disposed of them properly.  Parents drinking to the point they're incapable of taking responsibility of their children, let alone drive them home from said function.

I have never known a school community to carry on in this manner or indeed any individual at a school event so if this is the type of parent at the school and the way they imbibe alcohol and carry on then I would say a blanket ban on alcohol conumption at that particular schools events is warranted and the school did the correct thing by putting this policy in place. I would also go so far as to say that they ARE  most likely alcoholics given the reference they were drinking alcohol out of polystyrene cups as no normal person could be so desperate for a drink they are willing to drink out of those, you would just give it a complete miss.

Whilst parents at this particular school obviously cannot be trusted to behave appropriately when they have access to alcohol it does not mean that a blanket ban should then cover all schools where people have no issue with responsible behaviour if they choose to have a drink at a function, and of course others may choose not to which is fine and dandy also.

#317 roses7

Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:02 PM

Oh boy, what a thread!

I grew up with a father who was most likely an undiagnosed alcoholic and a mother who has 1-2 drinks most evenings. There is a world of difference between the 2.

My life experience taught me to be very wary of people who drink excessively and behave badly when drunk. It did not teach me that alcohol is an evil substance and that anyone who chooses to drink it in any quantity must automatically "need" it and is probably an alcoholic.

There is a staggering absence of logic evident here from most of the anti-drinking brigade, and therefore I will exercise my free choice to completely ignore them.



#318 Nora.

Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:13 PM

EB loves to over-react about alcoholism. I'm a 1-2 drinks 5 days a week gal. Hell, I'd love a drink at a school function they're so mind numbingly boring. But according to the moral police on EB, that makes me an alcoholic  rolleyes.gif



#319 Froger

Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:28 PM

QUOTE (fancie @ 13/04/2012, 01:16 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is so offensive.  Yes people do have a choice.  They have an option of applying to another school (albeit another public school) and that is a choice.  I know a great many people who choose one local public school over another local public school and I live in an area that is considered far less salubrious than Auburn, Guildford, or Lakemba!  People can choose the public school best suited to their needs and those of their families and in my education district very few requests for an 'out of area' enrolment are turned down.


Yes I suppose you're right. I guess that's why when my kids went to school in Sydney there was hardly a white child at their school. Leave all the "ethnics" to their ghetto.







QUOTE (fancie @ 13/04/2012, 01:16 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Everyone is welcome.  I suspect that those who feel excluded because some parents might choose to drink moderate amounts of alcohol at the event, would in all likelihood feel excluded even if alcohol was banned.  There will always be an excuse/reason why some people feel they are excluded.


Public schools in Australia are a very comfortable place for white people of culturally Christian background. The whole way school is organised is based around stuff that is comfortable and culturally appropriate for them. The school days, the school hours, the uniform, what is taught, how it is taught, who teaches, the food, the drink, the extra subjects and special activities. And because of this school is a very exclusionary place for a great many parents and students who are not of this background. Children like mine (Aboriginals or "ethnics") are forced to all the adapting. Which is unfair really as they are required by law to attend school. They pretty much feel excluded most of the time. They are not making "excuses". But so much stuff is just so inappropriate for them, yet they still get in there and do it. They already give up so much to try and do so much which is foreign to them to be included and try to get along with the school.

So if alcohol was served at school functions which weren't compulsary we would of course have a choice as to whether or not to go. We may say we didn't care, because we do say that about alot of things, as otherwise we are complainers trying to change the great Australian way of life, lol. And of course we want to be polite, so no one hates us anymore than they already do. So if we didn't go, it is just one more thing we feel excluded from. And if we did go we would still be excluded because all the people having just "one or two" glasses are not really wanting to talk to us anyway. Once they start drinking they just want to hang around with their mates being "jolly".


QUOTE (NinjahAlpaca @ 13/04/2012, 01:33 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How are you excluded because other people choose to do something you choose not to?

I choose not to wear maxi dresses as I find them terribly unflattering and mostly foul.  I also choose not to watch Idol, because I think it's brainless and utterly inane.  I choose to not eat custard, because it is evil, and yet I have no objection to others doing all of these things, even around me and the children at a school event.

I don't mind if you speak terribly wrong English around my kids, I don't care if you choose to smack your child in front of me and my children.  I am ok with you eating non-free-range eggs where my entire family can see you doing so.  You can even eat kangaroo if you are so inclined.

Just because I have a personal objection to all of the above does not mean that I can't deal with you exercising your right to do any of them in my presence.  Even if my kids are there, although it's a close call on the cage eggs.

I would, if it seemed appropriate at the time, use this as an educational experience for my children.  Look, kids, there's someone smacking their child.  We don't approve of that and we think they're utterly sh*yte parents for doing it but aren't I the best mummy ever because I don't smack you and am clearly superior because I am capable of disciplining you without smacking?


Wow, just wow. Just as an example, my ex speaks nine languages. He may not speak the best of English. So nice of you to not "mind" him speaking his bad English if he does make the effort to overcome his shyness about his English to go to a school function at a school which his children are forced to go to by law. And yeah, so white middle class to object to eating Skippy. As I said before, schools are a place of exclusion for so many parents and children. We "ethnics" do all the adapting and no one else seems to do a thing to make schools more inclusive. We just have to fit in.


QUOTE (**Mel** @ 13/04/2012, 09:57 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Sarah, most ppl are asking you to explain why ppl would feel excluded if alcohol was served at a school function.

You are saying that in a public school more ppl would feel excluded (don't agree, but whatever)

But, what makes them feel excluded in the first place?  Why would they not feel welcome?

'Cos more public school parents are alcoholic and would feel bullied?    huh.gif


Hopefully have explained a bit above. original.gif Alot of kids have to take on a whole new culture at school and they do so, without complaining, and often struggle day after day after day. Yet people are upset because I merely suggested that giving up alcohol for a few hours at a school function may serve to be more inclusionary?

This should give you some idea of what at lot of non-White kids need to cope with at school when it comes to having to adapt.

Edited by SarahM72, 13 April 2012 - 01:48 PM.


#320 Julie3Girls

Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:47 PM

QUOTE
Public schools in Australia are a very confortable place for white people of culturally Christian background. The whole way school is organised is based around stuff that is comfortable and culturally appropriate for them. The school days, the school hours, the uniform, what is taught, how it is taught, who teaches, the food, the drink, the extra subjects and special activities. And because of this school is a very exclusionary place for a great many parents and students who are not of this background. Children like mine (Aboriginals or "ethnics") are forced to all the adapting, even though they are forced by law to attend school. They pretty much feel excluded most of the time. They are not making "excuses". But so much stuff is just so inappropriate for them, yet they still get in there and do it. They already give up so much to try and do so much which is foreign to them to be included and try to get along with the school.

You obviously have big issues with the school system. Although I'm not exactly sure how the school days and hours can be considered exclusionary based on enthic background ...

But, I guess my question is, if things are inappropriate for your culture at the school, do you get involved and try and change things?

Do you attend the P&C meetings, and suggest activities or school events that fit in with your culture, and to try and bring it into the school?  You could even suggest that alcohol be banned in some events if your school is one that does allow alcohol. I admit, I haven't actually seen alcohol at our school functions (at the school), only at the adults only functions outside the grounds.

Do you volunteer for the canteen, join the committee and get the menu added to, with items that would be more acceptable? Our school canteen has made a lot of changes recently, mainly because of a few mums who are willing to do the work involved, like making homemade foods, organising for Sushi dishes for example. I've read posts about the things some schools offer in their canteens, and there is an incredible range.

We have a strong multicultural focus, with events organised.

A school is a community, and the parents who are involved are what makes it what it is.  
You want the school to change, get in there and get involved. Be the organiser. Or at very least, be a willing helper and give suggestions.
Particularly in a school which has a high number of children from different cultures, that is an ideal situation where you could have the backing to make changes.

#321 Froger

Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:56 PM

QUOTE (Julie3Girls @ 13/04/2012, 01:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You obviously have big issues with the school system. Although I'm not exactly sure how the school days and hours can be considered exclusionary based on enthic background ...


For example, the school days and calendar are arranged around Christian holidays and days of worship and Christian norms which are quite difficult for some kids to work around. eg Kids of non-Christian background who have different needs are punished for skipping school if, for example they attend a funeral of someone interstate and it needs to take  a few weeks for cultural reasons, or some kids regularily skip Friday afternoons for non-Christian worship and are told off for wagging etc.

That's the problem. So many people just can't see the inherent difficulties in the school system for kids who are not of a certain background. The days, hours and calender truly are a difficulty for a lot of kids. Just because you can't see it doesn't make the problems go away. ACtually because you, and people like you, can't see it, it makes it more of a problem.

#322 Bam1

Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:56 PM

QUOTE (SarahM72 @ 13/04/2012, 12:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
And because that many parents do not get to choose to send their kids to a public school, especially in some of the more diverse areas like I have mentioned, I do think that school events should try and be as inclusive as possible.


I don't think anyone would argue that public (& private) schools should be as inclusive as possible but being inclusive does not mean ensuring that everything that happens is okay with absolutely everybody. It means ensuring there is a choice - a vegetarian option at the sausage sizzle, non-alcoholic drinks as well as beer and wine, ensuring some events are held at night instead of all during the day, respecting other's culture (this does not mean having to follow the rules of their culture though).

Some schools do this well others not so well but an alcohol ban is not going to make a school more inclusive than what it already is. I would dare say that at my DD's public school, which does not allow alcohol, is the most exclusive school I've ever seen, it is very uptight and does a good job at excluding kids who don't fit the white middle class mould (mine included). Part of this is because its always been quite "white" and not used to different cultures. I'm hoping my involvement in the P&C might help change this. If it doesn't I will have to consider moving my DD but its not a fault of the School systen just the particular school's history.

Edited by Bam1, 13 April 2012 - 02:13 PM.


#323 Bam1

Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:08 PM

QUOTE (SarahM72 @ 13/04/2012, 02:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
For example, the school days and calendar are arranged around Christian holidays and days of worship and Christian norms which are quite difficult for some kids to work around. eg Kids of non-Christian background who have different needs are punished for skipping school if, for example they attend a funeral of someone interstate and it needs to take  a few weeks for cultural reasons, or some kids regularily skip Friday afternoons for non-Christian worship and are told off for wagging etc.

That's the problem. So many people just can't see the inherent difficulties in the school system for kids who are not of a certain background. The days, hours and calender truly are a difficulty for a lot of kids. Just because you can't see it doesn't make the problems go away. Actually because you, and people like you, can't see it, it makes it more of a problem.


You can't be serious - we can't change the system for every single person's issues with it - it wouldn't function. I know the African side of my family do struggle with the system but to arrange it better for them would mean it wouldn't work for others.  I know my best friends who are Thai struggle to get their children to school on time but a 10am start would mean my children waste 4 hours before school even starts.

Even white christians might need to go to a funeral interstate and I'm sorry if you feel your child needs a couple of weeks off for cultural reasons then it is up to you to work around it rather than the school. Skipping is wrong not matter what the reason, a parent ensuring their child has an allowable absence for cultural/personal whatever reason is completely different.

As a PP has said schools develop their culture over time and it usually does reflect the area, Unfortunately the system can never be flexible enough to suit everybody but most do find that they can work with the school even if it does take more effort at times.

#324 Froger

Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:17 PM

I'm not saying change the system for every single kid. I'm just saying be aware of the difficulties some kids face, and just be aware who is doing the most adapting for who, before you start complaining about people not fitting in or whatever.

And skipping is only "wrong no matter what the reason" because someone else has dictated rules that work for some and not for others. Most kids of ethnic background do their best to fit in. But as I said before it is mostly a one way street in regards to who is adapting to what. By this I'm not meaning that it should be changed (God forbid anything is made easier for those annoying ethnics  rolleyes.gif ), but just meaning be aware of the numerous difficulties some kids face just in simply turning up for school during a week/calendar that is not suited to them.

#325 Julie3Girls

Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:17 PM

QUOTE
That's the problem. So many people just can't see the inherent difficulties in the school system for kids who are not of a certain background. The days, hours and calender truly are a difficulty for a lot of kids. Just because you can't see it doesn't make the problems go away. ACtually because you, and people like you, can't see it, it makes it more of a problem.

You know, there is a reason I, and people like me, can't see it. It's because it's not part of our background, our culture. And people like YOU don't bother to explain it.  Believe it or not, people are not mind readers, and we don't all instantly know everything cultural need from every different culture.

QUOTE
For example, the school days and calendar are arranged around Christian holidays and days of worship and Christian norms which are quite difficult for some kids to work around. eg Kids of non-Christian background who have different needs are punished for skipping school if, for example they attend a funeral of someone interstate and it needs to take a few weeks for cultural reasons, or some kids regularily skip Friday afternoons for non-Christian worship and are told off for wagging etc


Ok, school holidays are not just arranged around christian holidays.  The school year is broken into 4 terms. The long summer holidays in this country happen to fall at the same time as Christmas.  But the main reason for that long school holiday is due to the summer weather.

Yes, Christmas and Easter are holidays based on christian beliefs. But that is a grand total of 4 public holidays.

Not sure what you mean by being punished for taking off time for a funeral - that surely isn't just restricted to people of ethnic background. I have relatives interstate and overseas, so I would be in the same position if I needed to attend their funerals.
Same with taking weeks off school for whatever reason - you can arrange it. My SIL took her kids out for 6 weeks, she made arrangements to get work from the school for the children.

Regularly skipping Friday afternoons ... I can understand why the school isn't happy with it, and you surely can't expect every school to suddenly finish early on Friday to cater for it.
BUT there should be a way for these parents to work with the school to find a solution.

Edited by Julie3Girls, 13 April 2012 - 02:19 PM.





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Boy found on swing died of hypothermia and dehydration, autopsy finds

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Child's play and laughter help battle fatigue

Feeling fatigued? Uh-huh, thought as much. Join the queue.

Dad shares entertaining 'how to hold a baby' clip

For many new dads, their own child is the first baby they have ever held. So one dad has posted an instructive YouTube video titled "How to Hold a Baby".

The Australian baby with 100,000 Facebook fans

She may be only eight months old, but Egypt has already amassed more than 100,000 fans and received a letter from royalty - Hollywood royalty that is.

Public welcome outside church for Princess Charlotte's christening

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have invited well-wishers to see Princess Charlotte outside church in Sandringham on day of her baptism.

Tongue tie: what you need to know

Tongue and lip tie can lead to many problems for babies - and their parents. Here are the signs of tongue tie and how it's treated.

My daughter is small but that doesn't matter

My daughter may be small, but it's my job as her parent to refocus back where it belongs - on who she is as a person

Wet wipes linked to rise in allergic reactions

The government has issued a health warning after a rise in allergic skin reactions has been linked to a preservative found in some wet wipes.

Gay couple in their 80s first to wed in Dallas after Supreme Court ruling

Love may have won, but it came with quite the wait.

William Tyrrell's family marks birthday with cake and renewed appeal

The family of missing boy William Tyrrell will mark his fourth birthday on Friday making a cake to share with friends and family as NSW police renewed their public appeal for information on his disappearance.

What all parents should know about safe babywearing

A picture of Ryan Reynolds always gets the girls talking, and a recently shared photo has done exactly that - but this time, it's for all the wrong reasons.

Baby's head shape reveals potentially fatal condition

Thinking her baby just had an unusually shaped head, a mother was shocked to discover it was instead linked to a dangerous condition.

'Help - my toddler hits me!'

My toddler has started hitting when he gets frustrated, is feeling ignored, or just thinks it might be fun.

Why IVF success rates may not be what you think

Transparency, accountability and responsibilityare essential measures to protect IVF vulnerable patients.

On the 10th anniversary of my son's death

This day marks a significant day. Today marks 10 years since I lost my son Kai.

Mother-in-law 'from hell' inspires survival guide

The happily ever after Nicola Milan had imagined wasn't to be – and she blames her mother-in-law.

Name your baby Quinoa, win a $10K gift card

Choosing a name for your little bundle of joy is always a major decision. It can be something traditional, trendy, creative … or inspired by the menu of your favourite chain restaurant.

Owning a pair of nail scissors does not make me a hairdresser

It's been a whole year since sleeping in until 10am. A whole year since having a peaceful shower.

The 83 children who were tragically let down in the last decade

Over a 10-year period, 83 children died from domestic violence abuse in NSW, with three quarters of the victims aged five years or under, the NSW Ombudsman has revealed.

Expert Q&A: Gross motor skill development in toddlers and preschoolers

Dr Katie Heathershaw answers questions about jumping, toe walking, riding a bike and being pigeon toed.

Is it reasonable to expect your partner to give up drinking in pregnancy?

From the moment that I fell pregnant with my son, I realised just how much my life had already started to change.

Stroke victim joins class action against makers of popular contraceptive pill

"I was terrified I would always be this way. The pill needs to come with a much higher warning."

Sexy time

Why you should get excited about scheduling sex

Unfortunately, the belief that sex should always be spontaneous is a myth. It just isn't.

When newborn photoshoots get messy

When it comes to newborn photoshoots, it is all about the timing.

Orphaned baby daughter Ayla wakes from coma

Former All Black Jerry Collins' critically injured orphaned daughter has awoken from her coma and is able to bottle-feed.

Dad takes miraculous catch while feeding baby

One American father has taken multitasking to a new level at a Cubs-Dodgers baseball game at Wrigley Field.

'Samuel is our firstborn, and he will never be forgotten'

Having lost their firstborn at one day old, the Carrolls were overjoyed to welcome their daughter Isobel into the world a year later.

Channel 10's Sarah Harris expecting first child

The Studio host Sarah Harris doesn't mind if her first baby is a boy or girl, but she does hope it is born with one thing in particular.

 
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What's hot on EB

27 funny ultrasound pictures

Ultrasounds give you a look at your growing baby ... and sometimes what appears to their womb-buddy, or your bub in an amusing position.

The top 6 misleading parenting terms

From 'morning sickness' to 'the terrible twos', there are many parenting terms that are misleading.

When 'good' nannies go bad

While most nannies take pride in their work, there can be some who have a hidden side.

Woman hospitalised for skinny jeans injury

Beware: skinny jeans might be bad for your health.

Gauze seeding: the bacteria-breeding birth trend

A number of women having caesarean deliveries are now taking steps to give their baby a better 'microbiome' start in life.

Jimmy Fallon writes new children's book for dads

Jimmy Fallon, host of NBC's The Tonight Show, recently wrote a children's book about every father's secret wish for their baby's first word to be "dada" - not "mama".

28 names for babies born in winter

Looking for some baby name inspiration for a bub born during the colder months? Here are 28 options from around the world to consider.

The horrible act that sparked a brawl at child's birthday party

The uncle of the seven-year-old girl at the centre of the brawl at child's birthday party in Sydney's west has described the events leading up to the alarming show of violence.

Babies 'benefit from iPads at a young age': study

More often than not, you'll read that screen time for children should be kept to a minimum - but some scientists are now challenging this way of thinking.

Do mums really just obsessively talk about their children?

Natalie Reilly describes three main types of conversations mothers have. And, surprise, they're not all about kids.

Why some dogs might attack babies or young kids

A baby's smell, the noises it makes and even its gaze can contribute to the potential for a dog attack.

Mum demands refund for 'beargina' christening cake

It was meant to be a tasteful cake to help celebrate a three-year-old's christening.

5 things no one warns you about after giving birth

How many times have you been warned about all the sleepless nights you have to 'look forward to' when you become a parent?

Police officer sang nursery rhyme as heartbreaking photo was taken

A police officer arrived at a devastating scene on Thursday: a car crash resulting in all passengers being thrown from the vehicle.

Don't worry, working mums: Just leave Dad in charge at home

Want to open the boardroom doors for women? Encourage - heck, praise - dads who stay home with their children.

Hilaria Baldwin shares post-baby selfie

Just two days after giving birth, actor Alec Balwin's wife posted a post-baby picture on social media.

'Help - my child won't ever do what I ask!'

Compliance is part of the parent-child relationship, but so is resistance. It's all natural.

Postnatal depression support gets $23 million boost in NSW

The Baird government will include $22.8 million in Tuesday's NSW budget to expand a program designed to help parents at risk of postnatal depression (PND).

'I'm just as tired, scared and stressed as you': stay-at-home dad's plea

I'm really lucky to have two great kids, but I found it really tough with so much being aimed at the mothers and not the fathers.

 

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