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is this a bad thing?
riding on the road

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#1 -HungryWoman-

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:19 AM

Yesterday afternoon when getting home from work my across the road neighbours were sitting on their footpath watching their grand daughters who were about 6 and 8yrs old, riding their scooters on the road (we live in a quiet dead end street cul-de-sac))  When getting out of the car I went over to chat and my DD decided that she would like to get her scooter out.  So I got her scooter, shoes and helmet and she road around with them with us supervising for about 30 minutes, she had a ball.  When DH got home from work she was telling him she was on her scooter and I explained.  He got cranky that I let our 3yr old ride on the road.  Was this warranted???

DD doesnt leave the yard without us on any occasion and has never wandered on the road before.  We have locked security screens on all doors and the back gate is always locked so she cant really get out by herself if she decided one day to do it by herself.

Edited by -HungryWoman-, 03 April 2012 - 07:22 PM.

#2 seaside_feral

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:25 AM

As long as she was supervised (which she was)& therefore not in any danger I think your DH overreacted.

#3 Madnesscraves

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:29 AM

If she was supervised I can't see the problem. I think your DH overreacted. You didn't do it on a busy street. You did it on a quiet dead end street.

#4 my serenity

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:30 AM

No original.gif my kids play in our quiet steet all the time, actually its nothing unusual to drive in and there are kids playing everywhere, When younger i supervised now older they go out on their own original.gif the people in the street know to watch for them and they have a great YELLING CAR system that they all use that works to get the kids scrambling to th sides when needed original.gif
Your husbnad over reacted esepcially when you were out watching original.gif

#5 pinkcupcakes

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:33 AM

its easy for our partners to react to things when they weren't there, isnt it? without the details i spose it sounds bad, but given your circumstances(the quiet cul de sac, plus 3 adults supervising, plus helmets etc) it doesnt sound like the kind of thing i'd be worried about. if, on the off chance some lunatic decided to come screaming round the corner, one would hope you'd have time to get the kids off the road safely, but given your area and the fact that you would probably hear them coming before you saw them, i dont think hubby's reaction is altogether warranted. i would be the same, i would make sure dd was safe and no way would i let her out the front without me. sounds like you had things under control, op.

#6 Straight*No*Chaser

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:47 AM

That's normal for our cul-de-sac. Sometimes we have 15 or more kids playing out there on bikes and scooters, from ages 2 to 14. The neighbours know to drive slowly into the street and we have a rule that the kids can only play in the end of the cul-de-sac, not the straight part, just in case a stranger hoons around the corner (not likely in this neighbourhood anyway).

#7 Dowager fancie

Posted 03 April 2012 - 08:06 AM

Up till now, we have had a blanket rule for DD - no riding on the road, ever.  When she was younger it prevented her needing to make decisions about whether it was safe/unsafe, supervised/unsupervised etc.

Our street is a very long cul-de-sac but with 4 other cul-de-sacs coming of our street at various points as well as having a 3-way intersection.  We have a lot of cars that once on the 'home straight' of about 120m absolutely floor it and probably get to 80kph easily.  Yet some of our neighbours think nothing of allowing their 3 and 4 years olds to ride unsupervised on this stretch of road.  We have come close to hitting  a couple of kids ourselves when they have shot off the footpath or come flying out of a side street.  Thank goodness we were already braking to turn into our driveway.

I think that with younger children, it can be difficult to comprehend and remember that it was okay to do whatever activity last time because mum was watching, but it's not okay this time because mum doesn't know they've taken their bike/scooter out to the street.

Maybe that's what concerns your DH.

#8 threeinnyc

Posted 03 April 2012 - 08:39 AM

Sorry I'm with your DH. No scooters on the road for me. Ever.

#9 Taffabella

Posted 03 April 2012 - 08:48 AM

I am also with your DH on this one.

We live in a very quiet secluded court like street and I DETEST seeing children of ANY AGE playing on the road here.

This might be because we have a park in the middle of our street (the street goes around the park) and it has a long footpath on it from end to end. There is also a footpath that runs right around the whole street that children can use to ride bikes, skateboards etc here - yet they don't.

Even supervised, I think it is irresponsible of anyone to let their child play on a road.

There is a difference between the stage when you teach your child to look right, look left, look right again before crossing the road and the attitude of "here's a bitumen playground, come in for dinner".

#10 Phascogale

Posted 03 April 2012 - 11:11 AM

Why didn't you let her ride on the footpath instead?

I'm in two minds about this.  An older child I would feel happier if on the road and with supervision but not a 3 year old.  But at the same time I'm guessing there were lots of warning should a car come down the road.

But even then I would err on the side of caution and not have them on the road.

#11 Julie3Girls

Posted 03 April 2012 - 05:45 PM

Why didn't you let her ride on the footpath instead?

Not all streets have paved footpaths. Trying to ride a scooter along the grass doesn't really work too well. original.gif

I think your DH over-reacted. You were there, supervising.

I let my older two girls ride on the road (8 and 10). It's a quiet culdesac. They know they don't go any further past our house towards the intersection, only up towards the dead end.  My youngest is only out there when I'm directly supervising.

#12 -HungryWoman-

Posted 03 April 2012 - 06:22 PM

Yep, there are no footpaths, just grass. I think my husband was worried that she might think she can play on the road unsuppervised. I think that if she is unsuppervised long enough that she can get her scooter through a locked gate we have bigger problems. Anyway, maybe not such a good idea at this age.

#13 barrington

Posted 03 April 2012 - 06:35 PM

We let our children ride their scooters on our cul-de-sac all the time.

However our street has less than 10 houses and is at the rear of our (only one road in) suburb.  There is no through traffic at all.

Our house is fully fenced with locked gates (activated only by remote control).  They can't go out on the road unless we let them out.

#14 bark

Posted 03 April 2012 - 06:40 PM

Yeah why not play on the footpath instead. I dislike seeing kids riding on the road, quiet or not. I also dislike riding on footpaths too, its disresepectful to other neighbours and a damn fuss for anyone leaving their driveway, why not invite the kids over and play in the yard or go to the park?

#15 keke

Posted 03 April 2012 - 06:40 PM

My son is 2 and we try to keep him off the road as he obviously wouldn't realise that it is not always safe on it. It is sometimes difficult to do with all the neighbours kids riding bikes and scooters in front of our house and seeing he doesn't go out without our supervision at times we have allowed him to play there. He just runs after the bigger kids and they are very good at getting him off the road or just holding him if he is near the road and any car turns into our street if my DH or myself are a few metres away. Same situation: a very quiet cul de sac.

I think it is ok occasionally as long as it is a quiet street and there is adult supervision.

Edited by keke, 03 April 2012 - 06:43 PM.

#16 Bodacious Prime

Posted 03 April 2012 - 06:52 PM

QUOTE (woofer @ 03/04/2012, 04:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yeah why not play on the footpath instead. I dislike seeing kids riding on the road, quiet or not. I also dislike riding on footpaths too, its disresepectful to other neighbours and a damn fuss for anyone leaving their driveway, why not invite the kids over and play in the yard or go to the park?

So where would you suggest they ride then?

OP, you were supervising and as you have said, your house is secure. I don't see the problem.

#17 Guest_senecio_*

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:00 PM

Supervised, in a quiet culdersac, I don't see a problem with it.

Supervised, in a quiet culdersac, I don't see a problem with it.

#18 ComradeBob

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:11 PM

I think your DH overreacted. Your DD was supervised and wearing appropriate safety gear. You've already said that she won't be able to get out by herself if she took it into her head.

I've let DD ride on the road in our cul-de-sac from the age of two, while someone has been there to supervise. I have no problem with this. I can't let her ride on the footpath, because we don't have one nearer than the main road about a kilometre away.

#19 Snorlax

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:15 PM

I grew up in a cul-de-sac street & I think your DH overreacted too.

#20 Princess.cranky.pants

Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:31 PM

I can't see a problem with it. I'm sure you are quite able to asses the risks and you were there supervising your DD.

I can't see what the issue is with kids riding on the road in a quite street. We live in a really small cul-de-sac (just 7 houses in our street). The only cars that come into the street are those that live here and everyone knows to look out for kids. Our 6 and 3 year old are always riding bikes in the street with the rest of the kids. Miss 3 has been riding out on the street since she was 2. Our 19 month old will be out there riding with the rest of them as soon as she can ride (she hates not being able to go out with the kids now so there will be no holding her back!).

Both DH and I feel it's safe for our kids to ride bikes in our street. It's something we did as kids and we see it as a normal part of childhood. There are hardly any footpaths in our area so none to ride on.

Edited by Princess.cranky.pants, 03 April 2012 - 07:43 PM.

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