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How much TV is too much for 19mo?


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#1 SilverSky

Posted 29 March 2012 - 05:10 PM

So was wondering the above.

DS could sit and watch TV all day if I let him (which of course I do not) but currently he watches about 30 mins in the morning while I get ready for the day and do some chores and then about 45 mins in the late arvo while I get dinner ready.
Is this too much?

He attends daycare 12 hours a week and has lots of outside play at home everyday and walks with the dog and playground visits.  At home I rotate his toys and he loves crafty stuff and I draw and play playdough with him etc.

I meant to ask the MCHN if this is too much TV but totally forgot.

What does everything else think?

#2 sleeplessmamma

Posted 29 March 2012 - 05:19 PM

Currently my DS (almost 19 months) watches WAY too much telly (I have 3 weeks today before baby #2 arrives and am exhausted!) and I feel incredibly guilty. I'm just too tired to do too much with him right now.

If I wasn't pregnant I would say your amount is fine. I didn't grow up watching a lot of telly and am hoping to do the same for my children but thats just on hold at the moment!

What I'm going to try and do (instead of having ABC for kids permanently on) is to get some interactive/educational dvds so that I actually 'control' what hes watching IYKWIM.



#3 SilverSky

Posted 29 March 2012 - 05:33 PM

QUOTE (sleeplessmamma @ 29/03/2012, 03:19 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Currently my DS (almost 19 months) watches WAY too much telly (I have 3 weeks today before baby #2 arrives and am exhausted!) and I feel incredibly guilty. I'm just too tired to do too much with him right now.

If I wasn't pregnant I would say your amount is fine. I didn't grow up watching a lot of telly and am hoping to do the same for my children but thats just on hold at the moment!

What I'm going to try and do (instead of having ABC for kids permanently on) is to get some interactive/educational dvds so that I actually 'control' what hes watching IYKWIM.


Thanks. I'm pregnant also but only 2nd trimester so it hasn't really hit me yet, but I do feel guilty as I know how I'll feel in a couple of months and when baby no.2 comes then I'm sure he will probably be watching more TV than now! So I know what you mean.

The educational dvds are a good idea - I'll look into that original.gif

#4 JupitersMoon

Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:02 PM

Personally no I don't think that's too much at all.  

My DD is nearly 22 months and only in the last month really started watching tv and I'd say she watches about the same amount, but usually in 15 minute spurts.  She loses interest quickly.

And I must say I am guilty of having Abc2 on almost all day when im home ph34r.gif she really pays little attention to it though.

#5 CherryAmes

Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:07 PM

The American Pediatric Association, based on a wide number of studies, has advised no television at all under the age of two years. There was one particular study which showed that the more exposure to TV a child had, the slower their language development. There were also other studies linking TV to behavioural and attentional difficulties, obesity, and violent behaviour.

Obviously, each parent has to make their own choices based on their own experiences, but that's the current advice based on research.

#6 tiggy2

Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:37 PM

I would say half an hour is plenty.
How about some lift the flap books, talking books, even the leap pad type books that make noises when you touch them with the pen for when you need a break?

#7 Great Dame

Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:43 PM

I want to know how you get your kids to watch tv  ph34r.gif

The advice is no TV before two and I went along with that for the most part with my first but I'm actually trying to get my second to sit still for 15 minutes while I'm doing dinner - he's a bit of a pest under my feet - but he won't have it at all, no interest.

With my first who didn't watch anything regularly until after 2, I recorded Play School for him and only let him watch that as I figured it was educational and at least had real people in it who talked to you.  So maybe do that OP.

Edited by MadameCatty, 29 March 2012 - 06:45 PM.


#8 Natttmumm

Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:47 PM

Mine only watch tv now at 2.5 and 4.5, I would let them younger but they weren't linterested. Mine watch about 20 mins in the morning and half hr after dinner. I think your is fine

#9 Silver Girl

Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:52 PM

It is more than I was comfortable with when DS was that age but I totally understand that it allows you to get things done and it doesn't sound too excessive.

One thing that would sometimes work for me was telling DS that I was doing my cooking and suggesting that he did some too at his play kitchen. I would then ask him to give his teddy bear some dinner and then bath the teddy, change its nappy, go to the shop etc. This would occupy DS for a while.

#10 bluesurrender

Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:59 PM

Honestly?

Any TV is too much at that age in my opinion.

Edited by bluesurrender, 29 March 2012 - 07:00 PM.


#11 spando

Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:01 PM

I find that a DVD is a bit easier to control. Abc2 just rolls over to the next show and sometimes I don't notice where as a DVD you can select an episode it's a more definable time.

#12 bjk76

Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:36 PM

Sorry, but I agree with PPs that they shouldn't really have any TV before 2. But, that is in an ideal world and so I assume wouldn't work in every family. DS is 1 and he hasn't watched TV until now (although most babies in mothers' group watch In The Night Garden) and I plan to follow recommendations of no TV until at least 2. DS loves his stories, so they are 'quiet time' for him, although we only read them before sleeps. Otherwise I try to rotate his toys. Good luck!

#13 mumandboys

Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:38 PM

Sounds ok to me.

My 20 month old watches some TV, hard to say how much.  As he's number 4 it's quite difficult to control each individual child's TV time.

I'm aware of the recommendations but all of my kids have watched TV from an early age, so I'm obviously not a follower of those particular recommendations.  I just do what I can do.


#14 ~chiquita~

Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:46 PM

DS watches for about an hour in the morning whilst I have my coffee, wake up, and get dressed. He doesn't always watch it though, and will wonder off and play with his toys. I do the same in the afternoon when making dinner.

He only watches The Wiggles and Dora DVD's.

Edited by ~chiquita~, 29 March 2012 - 07:46 PM.


#15 HANI

Posted 29 March 2012 - 08:07 PM

I think it depends on what you believe is best for you and your child. For me I let my 22 month old watch a max of 1hr of tv a day (depending on how busy our day is with playgroups and other activities).    

He gets a rotation of
  • Sesame Street (I like the values they teach)
  • The Wiggles (he loves them) incl Wiggle and Learn
  • other educational DVDs like Baby Einstein and others

I believe that in this day and age where technology is such a big part of our lives, I could use some of it to help aid learning. He learnt most of his body parts from one of these DVDs (with reinforcement from me). I'm constantly amazed at how much he picks up. Sometimes we use You tube too and we pick topics he likes (like giraffes) and we watch videos on it.

I also try not to use TV as a babysitter. I normally sit next to him and discuss what he is watching. In fact recent research found that watching TV with your child can improve his/ her vocabulary.

#16 libbylu

Posted 29 March 2012 - 08:14 PM

I would say half an hour should be maximum for the under twos.

RCH has a policy brief about TV in this age group which recommends none.

http://www.rch.org.au/emplibrary/ccch/PB_1...e_final_web.pdf

#17 CherryAmes

Posted 30 March 2012 - 08:47 AM

For those who want another distractor, I find a CD works (I have playschool and Merrily Merrily). I give her (miss 14mths) her box of instruments and put on the CD and she is usually happy until it's finished. She's not dancing and singing the whole time or anything, generally just playing, but she really seems to know the songs! This gives me time to do the washing up/tidying. She is in her playroom - the spare room with a safety gate - so I know she can't get into any real trouble, and I occasionally check on her if she's too quiet!

#18 BearBait

Posted 30 March 2012 - 08:53 AM

30 minutes maximum.  In my opinion TV stunts their growth.  The nanny puts on 30mins of playschool over lunch but when DD is home with us we NEVER watch TV with her.  too many other things to do.

#19 babybrain

Posted 30 March 2012 - 10:14 AM

There is a recommendation that children under 2 years of age should not watch any TV.

I agree with the fact that ABC2 is just too convenient to put a stop to the little ones watching. I would suggest DVDs or episodes on iPad.

At the moment if my 4 year old watches something, myself or my DH generally watch it together with him and we make sure it is educational. We try not to use it as a babysitter, but it does happen .

I must say when number 2 came along a little over a year ago there was a while when he was watching way more TV than I ever intended. I still feel bad about it, but then again I had to do what I had to do to make things work.

We put a time limit or episode limit (1 or 2) and stick to it.

DS2 (16 months) has sofar not watch any TV.

I really can't understand why people have the TV on all day huh.gif , but that is probably another thread


#20 Fillyjonk

Posted 30 March 2012 - 11:01 AM

I am in the "no tv before two" camp and even my three year old only watches about half an hour a day a few times a week. I know that is a little extreme though and not for everyone.

To answer your question, I do think that more than an hour of tv a day is too much for a 19 month old. The guidelines I have read are:

QUOTE
Australian Guidelines for screen time:
> Australia’s Physical Activity Recommendations recommend that 5-18 y.o accumulate no more than 2 hours of screen time a day for entertainment (excluding educational purposes).
> Guidelines for children under five have also been released and recommend children younger than 2 years do not spend anytime viewing TV or other electronic media and for children 2-5 years less than 1 hour per day. The references are in this document


So if I was going to let my 19 month old watch tv, I would probably stick to the <1 hour a day rule.

ETA: Owen does love listening to audio books though, and has free reign over the stereo most of the day. We borrow them from the library mostly (books with cds in the back).

Edited by with the goo goose, 30 March 2012 - 11:06 AM.


#21 SarDonik

Posted 30 March 2012 - 11:07 AM

QUOTE (bluesurrender @ 29/03/2012, 06:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Honestly?

Any TV is too much at that age in my opinion.


This ^

It should be used in 'emergencies' i.e if you're sick or need a dump.

#22 Doodalicious

Posted 30 March 2012 - 03:48 PM

I know there are recommendations that kids under two watch no TV at all, but I think that's a bit unrealistic for most families. My 19 month old is pretty good at entertaining himself, but on the evenings where he has been at day care he will not do this. My options for making him dinner are either to have him squirming on my hip the whole time (which aggravates my back), or to sit him in front of half an hour of "In the Night Garden". I don't believe it hurts him, it settles him down ready for story and bed time, and most importantly, it lets me get the job done without hurting myself. I think "no TV" is a noble aim but not realistic. Much like myself eating two fruits and and five vegies every day.

#23 Maybe this month

Posted 30 March 2012 - 07:23 PM

I wouldn't worry OP.  This is one recommendation that I don't intend to take much notice of.  My 16 month old daughter will only watch about 1 minute of tv before getting bored so she doesn't really watch much but I like having the tv on.  In my opinion, there are a lot worse things you can do than have your child watch tv for an hour a day.  As long as she/he are stimulated in other ways, get to play with you a lot, read books, get outside and just generally play and discover, I don't think a bit of tv is too much of a problem.  Just my opinion of course.




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