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What did your grandparents do for a living?
Who has the most interesting occupations to share


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164 replies to this topic

#1 Balto1

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:20 AM

Continuing on the grandparents theme.... Let's see whose GPs had the most interesting occupation. Any mercenaries, silent screen actors, ladies of the night out there, etc etc .

Maternal GPs- wheat farmers
Paternal GPs- beef farmers

I don't think mine are going to win in the interesting stakes. But they had hard-working but happy lives.

#2 PixieVee

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:23 AM

On the maternal side my grandfather was an engineer and my grandmother never worked.

On the paternal side I have no idea, they died 20 or more years before I was born and my dad doesn't really talk about them.

#3 Angelot

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:24 AM

My maternal grandfather ran a sugar estate (his wife didn't work).

My paternal grandfather did a variety of things, including being a boilermaker in the merchant navy, and a lighthouse keeper.  His wife was a nurse.

#4 ubermum

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:25 AM

My maternal grandmother was a seamstress. One of her jobs was sewing shrouds for funerals. She also worked in a brewery for a long time.
My maternal grandfather was a carpenter and joiner.
My paternal grandparents were dairy farmers.

#5 haras1972

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:25 AM

my dad's parents owned a general store in the middle of nowhere in Gippsland.

my mum's parents - my grandmother didn't work, and my grandpa was a tram driver.

#6 Elemenopee

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:25 AM

At 5 foot and a 1/4 inch, my grandpa did very well as a jockey. Later, after he had been to WW2, he worked the family farm, and would break in the wild horses that roamed it.

#7 Chelara

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:25 AM

Mums dad, jeweller and watchmaker. Mums mum, hairdresser. Bth had their own businesses and 5 kids including twins.

Dads family were farmers, orchard I think. 9 children.

#8 rainycat

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:26 AM

My Grandad ran a foundry.  My Grandma didn't work.

#9 geckosrule

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:27 AM

Paternal grandfather.........cattle farmer
Paternal grandmother........ran the household and did all the accounts for the farm


Maternal grandfather.......bookie
Maternal grandmother......corner shop owner

#10 Carmen02

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:28 AM

my grandpa worked for the council doing odd jobs like lawn mowing and all that, my grandma didnt work...my grandparents on dads side never knew them

#11 ubermum

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:29 AM

QUOTE (PixieVee @ 20/02/2012, 10:23 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
On the maternal side ......my grandmother never worked.

QUOTE (Ange Vert @ 20/02/2012, 10:24 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My maternal grandfather ran a sugar estate (his wife didn't work).


I bet that both of those women worked their butts off....they just didn't get paid a wage for it. I would have hated to have run a household 50 odd years ago.

#12 Bel Rowley

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:30 AM

Paternal grandfather - Scientist
Paternal grandmother - Did some secretarial and seamstress work but mostly didn't work
Maternal grandfather - Left school at 15, worked at various jobs and ended up an executive at the Sunraysia Fruit Co-op. Also a real estate valuer.
Maternal grandmother - 'Bursar' at a high school for close to 40 years.

#13 Guest_Craptacular_*

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:32 AM

Paternal grandmother - SAHM (she raised 4 boys)
Paternal grandfather - Police officer
Maternal grandmother - worked in a shop possibly a post office
Maternal grandfather - I think he worked in a factory.

#14 Iliketoflounce

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:35 AM

Maternal GP, grandad worked in meat works then an ambo in myrtleford then when he moved to wangratta he was a milkman my nan didn't work

my paternal GP, im not sure about my dads dad all i know he died by electrocution (suicide) my nan was a seamstress

#15 la di dah

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:35 AM

Maternal, my grandmother was a professional bra fitter and saleswoman in a corset shop. My grandfather was a contractor,  and sometimes a cabbie. He was a contractor when I knew him, he was very good at sketching designs and I remember vividly when I was 2, he would tell me stories and sketch the illustrations as he went. He also drove a big red pickup with ladders on it, and I was allowed to ride in it, which I assure you was a Big Deal to a toddler.

As a cabbie, he had to carry a gun, his favourite client was Andre the Giant, he disparaged a famous musician as "the rude sort of b**ch that eats fried chicken in someone else's car" and once sheared everything from the bottom of the windshield up off a big old fashioned Checker Cab, but lived.

He was always angry he turned 17 right as WWII ended so he didn't get to enlist but his older brother did.

Paternal, my grandfather owned a gas station and auto parts store, and my grandmother kept the books. She also was very shy about being seen as working, though she was, because she was a bit sensitive about class distinctions, but my dad said "for the bookkeeper, she sure drove a lot of trucks."

Edited by la di dah, 20 February 2012 - 09:43 AM.


#16 kadoodle

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:35 AM

Maternal grandfather was a spy in WW2.  He had a hollow tooth with cyanide in it and wasn't to be taken alive.  When the war ended he worked as a diplomat before retiring to be a boilermaker and train driver.  

Maternal grandmother didn't do paid work.

Paternal grandfather was given a "soldier settlement farm" after returning from WW2.  

Maternal grandmother was a seamstress before retiring to run the farm due to my grandfather's ill health.

#17 FeralFerretOfDoom

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:37 AM

My maternal grandfather was a scientist and my grandmother was a nurse and ambulance driver (in the war).

My paternal grandfather worked in the railways and my grandmother worked in the post office before she married him (had to resign once she married).

However, BEFORE he got respectable and married my grandmother, my paternal grandfather teamed up with his brother as a duo of roving magicians/conmen in Africa, playing mainly on the naivite of the native population.


ETA - damn you, kadoodle. I'm pretty sure I would have been the winner so far if you hadn't jumped in while I was posting with your James Bond grandfather. Show off.

Edited by RootFerretOfDoom, 20 February 2012 - 09:38 AM.


#18 Unatheowl

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:38 AM

Maternal grandmother was a fashion model before the war in Austria.  When they came to Australia she didn't work.  My maternal grandfather was a glazier.

My paternal grandmother didn't work.  My paternal grandfather started out as a Jesuit priest, then joined the polish army and was present at the Warsaw uprising.  They came to Australia and he practiced as a seventh day Adventist minister until he died.

#19 ThatsNotMyName

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:38 AM

Peternal Grandfather - worked in a truck yard, used to drive trucks but was deaf in one ear then lost sight in one eye so couldn't drive any more.
Paternal Grandmother - seamstress and other random odd jobs to keep everyone afloat. Had an enviable vegie garden & fruit trees biggrin.gif

Maternal Grandparents - dairy farmers. Before that my grandfather was in the New Zealand Merchant Navy then managed someone else's property before buying their own farm. After selling the farm in semi retirement in the 60's he built one of the first blocks of flats (Ocean Front) on the main beach front at Forster NSW, it's the oldest original building still there.

#20 Feral timtam

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:45 AM

Paternal grandparents were boring, he ran the family trucking and crane business and she did the book keeping.

Maternal grandparents were Jacks of all trades! Granddad was a stockman, did a stint as a truck driver and as a mechanic, they also had a dairy farm at one, ran a petrol station and a fish and chips shop as well. The only time my very progressive grandmother was not working was when Granddad was doing the truck driving and mechanics work. Otherwise she was working right along side him and pulling a wage for her efforts.

#21 Roselet

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:50 AM

Paternal GF was a tradesman in a factory, until he lost his arm in an accident. When he couldn't work GM supported the family running a family day care and cleaning. After he died she moved to Aus and worked well into retirement age as a carer.

Maternal GF was a school teacher - posibly maths but i'm not sure, and then he ran the school during the war. GM was a French teacher, even went and lived in a garret in France on her own to attend the Sorbonne. Very well educated lady for her time (she was born at the turn of the century).

#22 IsolaBella

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:50 AM

MGF - Stone Mason... continued working into his 80's
MGM - Farm/General Store
PGF - University Science Lecturer
PGM - Nurse (She became a widow with an 18mo and 3yo to support)



#23 amabanana

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:51 AM

ME
Paternal grandfather.........Engineer, ran a munitions factory during the war.  
Paternal grandmother........Seamstress

Maternal grandfather....... Train driver
Maternal grandmother......Shoemaker

DH
Paternal grandfather.........Stationmaster at London's Kings Cross
Paternal grandmother........SAHM

Maternal grandfather....... Aeronautical Engineer
Maternal grandmother......Property developer


#24 toosenuf

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:51 AM

My Pop worked for Akubra Hats, Gran, i am not sure if she worked.
My mothers parents, dont think they worked at all  or it could be that i cannot remember being told what they did.

Both of DH's grandfathers were builders and lol DH is not at all a handyman.  Again not sure about his grandmothers'.

Edited by toosenuf, 20 February 2012 - 09:51 AM.


#25 I*Love*Christmas

Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:52 AM

Maternal side:
Grandfather - electrician
Grandmother - didn't work when her kids were young but started working as a receptionist at a doctors surgery and then later in a call centre for Boystown

Paternal side:
Grandfather - farmer
Grandmother - primary school teacher.




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