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Gestational Diabetes #64


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#1 ~A2~

Posted 31 January 2012 - 07:59 PM

Hi all

New thread time

Previous thread

Regards

Ali

#2 PleaseBeAdvised

Posted 06 February 2012 - 06:14 PM

*bump* Repost for convenience

Hello there,

I have spent some time reading old GD support threads, but couldn't really find a discussion for my question. If this has been discussed to death I apologise in advance and please point me in the right direction.

I was diagnosed with PCOS and insulin resistance early 2011, at which time I saw a dietician who provided a diet for insulin resistance. This appears to have worked with the metformin dose I was on (1500mg) as I fell pregnant within 3 cycles, and also lost a few kg. I should mention I am a "thin cyster" and don't have any of the usual symptoms of PCOS (I am normal weight, no excess hair etc) apart from irregular periods.

My first GTT (16 wks) came back negative, however, I tested positive at 24 weeks (fasting 5.4, 2hr 8.7). I am being given the chance to attempt to control levels via diet and exercise before insulin is considered.

I have been testing for 2 days. I can control my day time levels (below 7) but my fasting levels don't get below 5.4. I suppose I am looking for advice as to what may have assisted in keeping these levels down. My current practice is meal at 730-8pm, followed by 45 minute brisk walk, then small strawberries with custard or similar before bed.

Has anyone found that eating dinner and supper earlier assists with fasting levels? My initial dietician (insulin resistance diet) advised a strict 2hr meal plan (eat every 2 hours with no food in between, and don't eat after 8pm) but the hospital dietician (GD) did not agree: she agreed eating every 2 hours is a good idea but not essential, and stated free foods could be consumed in the interim.

Any advice is much appreciated!

MizRhi, I am sorry for your loss. hugs.

Chiara

#3 MickeyBoo

Posted 07 February 2012 - 07:47 AM

QUOTE
Has anyone found that eating dinner and supper earlier assists with fasting levels? My initial dietician (insulin resistance diet) advised a strict 2hr meal plan (eat every 2 hours with no food in between, and don't eat after 8pm) but the hospital dietician (GD) did not agree: she agreed eating every 2 hours is a good idea but not essential, and stated free foods could be consumed in the interim.


Just wanted to add that I eat dinner anywhere from 5pm-7pm and it makes no difference to fasting levels, neither does having an evening snack or not. The dietician, endo and diabetes educator have all told me to have a snack at 9pm, and my insulin shot at 9.30pm.

I'm not sure in the logic of eating free foods inbetween meals, my BSL's are affected by loads of different things, and I have found this time around that some foods that have no carbs in them affect my levels a lot. Good example is cheesespread, if I have two pieces of toast with vegemite and a cup of tea for breakfast my levels come back under 5.7 every time, if I have the same but swap the vegemite for cheesespread, my levels are high 6's. There is no carb and no sugar and low fat in cheesespread, so it makes no sense for it to affect my levels the way it does, but it does every time. shrug.gif

I find that chewing sugar free gum in between meals can help, but it also seems that my body likes the two hour eating regime now, I set my alarm to test my BSL's at the two hour mark, and literally 5mins before it goes off every time my belly starts rumbling like clockwork!

#4 PleaseBeAdvised

Posted 08 February 2012 - 07:09 PM

Thanks for your input MickeyBoo,

Have been tracking for a while now. Saw the specialist on Monday who advised I only need to check my day levels 3 days per week (have demonstrated diet and exercise control) but will need to continue to check fasting levels every morning. I did manage to get them below 5 on Sunday and Monday, which I am attributing to 1 1/2 hour yoga and 45 minute walk (Saturday) and 45 minute swim and 45 minute walk (Sunday). Levels shot up over 5 again on Tuesday sad.gif I think it will be insulin for me to manage fasting levels: although I have "identified" what works for me it is not a routine I can feasibly sustain Monday - Friday. Unfortunately there are not enough hours in the day when you are working full time, although I am doing what I can (at least 30 minutes a day plus incidental).

On a side note, I am really stabby at Sydney weather at the moment. Walking to and from work would cover by 45minute x2, but this bloody rain is making things impossible!!!

I must say the 2 hours work for me as well, but only if I get a good serve of protein with the main meal.

#5 ssj

Posted 09 February 2012 - 10:58 PM

Hi everyone,

I'm 33 weeks with my 3rd pregnancy and have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes a week ago. (Kind of late, I know. Someone was supposed to call me with the results of the GTT but for some reason they didn't...).

I've only been testing for 2 days, and have been under each time (yay). I enjoyed reading over the last thread and getting lots of great tips from others. Really appreciate the advice of those who have gone before me.

My question is - is it possible to eat any kind of cakes or biscuits at all? Does anyone know of some tasty and easy recipes for cakes/biscuits/slices that can fit with thise sort of diet? Or is it a matter of portion control ie I can have something like that but only in very small doses?

Actually I have another question - how much protein can I eat? I feel hungry alot...

Thanks!

SSJ

#6 PleaseBeAdvised

Posted 10 February 2012 - 08:57 PM

Hi Ssj,

Will you be seeing a dietician? I was automatically referred by my midwife clinic (I am in the public system). I went in with a list of my favourite foods and essentially got yes or no answers as to whether they were recommended or not. Very helpful original.gif Don't be embarrassed to ask, as I now know 3 cups of movie popcorn is actually a-ok.

Some PP have noted sugar free biscuits/chocolate and the like for snacks, but I haven't tried them as yet. Not much of a biscuit person myself, but interested in everyone's view on chocolate.

This may help
http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/collection...etes+friendly/1

I have it bookmarked but haven't gone through to see what desserts are on offer.

#7 MickeyBoo

Posted 11 February 2012 - 07:52 AM

QUOTE (ssj @ 09/02/2012, 10:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My question is - is it possible to eat any kind of cakes or biscuits at all? Does anyone know of some tasty and easy recipes for cakes/biscuits/slices that can fit with thise sort of diet? Or is it a matter of portion control ie I can have something like that but only in very small doses?

Actually I have another question - how much protein can I eat? I feel hungry alot...

SSJ


Hi SSJ,

No one has ever mentioned protein intake to me, aside from make sure I have a normal serve per meal and fill up with more vegetables. If I mention that I have felt hungry they say to eat more vegetables as they are 'free foods'. I sometimes have a steamer bag of veg at lunch time and it does fill me up. I have found this guide online from a WA hospital which is almost identical to what they give out at my hospital in the information sessions and initial consult. It has quite an extensive list of foods to eat/foods to avoid and a page on snack options. Well worth a read.

http://www.kemh.health.wa.gov.au/brochures...rs/wnhs0560.pdf

I have found Sugar Free Marie biscuits at Aldi and you can have 5 biscuits for one serve of carb, they are quite plain and not really appealing, but are ok dunked into my hot milo wink.gif My dietician recommended Tea Biscuits, I can have two of them for one serve of carb and they are much nicer. If you do a google search on Low GI recipes there will be a fair bit that comes up, I like buying the Diabetes Living magazine and looking at their recipes too.



#8 ssj

Posted 11 February 2012 - 06:01 PM

Hi,

ChiaraB - yes, I have seen a dietician, but only once so far. I did ask a bunch of questions and have more for next time, but it'll be a week and a half before I see her again. I got the feeling that she was trying to answer with 2 hats on - one that was thinking in terms of GD, and one that was about general wellbeing. EG I asked her whether sausages were good or not, and she said, um, they're ok, by which I assumed she meant they aren't going to hugely affect my levels, but they're not that healthy overall. I've been able to manage my levels pretty well so far, so maybe she'll relax a bit with my next appointment when she sees that I've been able to manage it so far.

Thanks for the Taste link! I searched their low-GI recipes but not their diabetic friendly ones. I guess I'm a bit confused about whether it's more important to reduce my refined carbs or my sugar? She did tell me that even though it sounds strange, sugar and honey etc aren't actually high GI (I think she said they were medium?) and that something like white rice was worse than having a spoon of sugar in some greek yoghurt, for example.. I figured out I could make crumble, especially if I reduced or eliminated the flour in the crumble topping, and used lots of rolled oats. Maybe anzac biscuits as well? Will have to search the supermarket shelves for low-sugar/low-GI biscuits.

Has anyone done any baking with oat flour? Is there even such a thing?

MickeyBoo - that document is heaps more comprehensive than the brochures I got so I look forward to going through it in more detail. It's brilliant, thank you! No Aldi where I am (very sad) so will have to look elsewhere for similar biscuits. The protein thing is a big deal for me. So if I have fruit without yoghurt I'm always hungrier, or if I have salad and bread for lunch without tinned salmon, cheese or a hard-boiled egg, I'm starving an hour later. What's the GI rating of Milo? The nutritional panel, from memory, said that 20g had 12 or 14g of carbs so I was a bit scared to try it. It is one of the questions I have planned for the dietician.

Very proud of myself - the whole family went to a tropical fruit icecream place this afternoon, I had just had a coke zero, with a few licks of the different flavours!

#9 PleaseBeAdvised

Posted 11 February 2012 - 11:18 PM

Ssj,

Sounds like we had dieticians coming from slightly different perspectives! I was advised to concentrate on the "exchange" method: 1 exchange = 15g carbohydrate, so 3 exchanges per main meal and 1 exchange per snack (ETA 3 snacks per day). Avoid all biscuits/lollies/soft drink/juice and hi GI foods (although have no idea how to differentiate between GIs and have to google as I shop  mellow.gif). I wasn't given any guidelines on protein fats etc and my dietician advised against "lite" meals and the splenda type sugars, I think because I am well within weight range and started pregnancy a little underweight. The dietician is worrying more about my baby's weight, rather than my weight, if that makes sense.

Congrats on being strong and going without the ice cream! I walked all the way to my favourite gelato shop with DH last night and didn't have a bite! 1 hour round trip. HAving said that, I did down a fair bit of popcorn and a coke zero at the cinema tonight  blush.gif

Edited by ChiaraB, 11 February 2012 - 11:19 PM.


#10 MickeyBoo

Posted 12 February 2012 - 07:52 AM

I think my dietician sounds like somewhere in the middle lol. In my past two pregnancies I was told to watch my carbs, stick to a handful size per serve, and have one serve of carbs per meal. they were really blase and not very informative. I could still have 'diet' treats as long as they were low GI (so things like nestle mousse cups etc) and stick to sweetners instead of sugar. But I could also still have things like honey and sugar, I just had to limit my portions.

This time around they are using the carb exchange system, telling me that 15gm of carb is one serve, and I was to eat 1-2 serves per snack and 3-4 per main meal. I am used to reading labels so for me working out 15gm serves of carbs is so much easier and I don't feel as restricted diet wise this time. They aren't as strict on the brown rice/wholemeal pasta thing and are happy for me to have white rice/white pasta as long as my levels are fine. I can still have a scrape of jam or honey if I really want it and they prefer me to use sweetners. Both of which are fine as I don't eat jam or honey and only use sweetner in my coffee.

I prefer a higher protein diet too and while not pregnant I am still diabetic, but tend to cut the carbs down to a bare minimum and rely heavily on proteins. That is the most effective way for me to lose weight. In pregnancy there's no problem with having extra protein to help fill you up, but the right carb serve has to come first. Some proteins have a higher fat content (fat converts to sugar so that's a big no-no) or a higher sugar so you just need to read the labels. I have found that boiled eggs are a really good snack, little tins of tuna, and cheese on multigrain crackers is my new best friend.

This time I am finding it easier with diet, I am on insulin after lunch/dinner and overnight, but I am eating the right carb exchanges and I am having fruit or crackers for snacks and really just avoiding all the cakey/sweet things. I will admit to having a piece of something nice when I go for a coffee once a week, but I halve it with a friend and then DS gets half of my half so I get a taste, but it's not a big one. I go for my first sizing scan in 4 weeks so I'm hoping it comes back normal and if not then I can adjust my diet. As far as my levels go they are all well within normal range.

Milo is low GI when served with low fat milk. (GI of 35 with milk and 55 with water) One serve is 3 heaped teaspoons and 1 cup of milk. I have 2 heaped teaspoons and about 3/4 cup of hot milk and top the rest up with hot water. My dietician recommends a cup of milo as an evening snack.

Edited by MickeyBoo, 12 February 2012 - 07:53 AM.


#11 ssj

Posted 13 February 2012 - 01:54 PM

Hi everyone,

Well, after 5 days of testing I finally had a high reading, 7.7, 2 hours after breakfast. I had what I always had for breakfast, and other days I've been 6.6 or 6. I guess I wasn't watching my portion size. We all slept in and were rushing to get to school. I've re-mixed my muesli to include more seeds, nuts and all bran, which will mean I'm having less dried fruit per serve. Hopefully it was just a portion thing? I will have to watch everything I eat a bit more. I think I was getting a bit cocky/lazy b/c things had been going well so far.

Just chopped a mountain of veggies for tonight's ginger chicken stir-fry. Everyone will have noodles and I will have sweet potato mash!

#12 PleaseBeAdvised

Posted 13 February 2012 - 05:10 PM

I also had a higher than normal read this morning after brekkie, which I'm attributing to portion size also. Need to be less blase.

As I can't get my fasting levels down, I am trying metformin in the evenings: if this doesn't work, insulin it is. Has anyone had success with metformin and GDM?

#13 MickeyBoo

Posted 14 February 2012 - 07:21 AM

Cereals are one thing that never work for me with BSL's, doesn't matter which one I try I either eat a miniscule portion and end up starving, or my BSL's go high. I pretty much have to stick to vegemite toast and a cup of tea/coffee, which brings me back mid 5's.

SSJ Stress and sickness can make your levels go up too, so if you had a particularly hectic morning that could have attributed to your levels being higher than normal.

ChiaraB I was on metformin when I fell pregnant and take it daily when I'm not. I was on it till 14weeks, that was when my levels started going up. When I had my first diabetes baby 4-5 years ago metformin was really 50-50 for safety in pregnancy, they could find no side effects from using it, however because they can't trial on pregnant women the evidence is inconclusive. When I had my second diabetes baby 2-3 years ago it was swaying more towards 60-40, more in favour of the positive, and this time around they are 80-20. With the first two i came off the met by 8 weeks. This time I was on it right up to needng insulin and my Dr told me that I had the option of staying on the metformin as well as starting insulin, but I declined, only for a personal choice that it isn't classified 100% safe in pregnancy and when insulin was there to do the same job and it is safe, then I would prefer that option. My Dr is comfortable with metformin being safe, it was just me that said I wasn't if that makes sense.

In saying all of that, it does work to keep your levels stable fairly well, and as long as you are on the extended release, and not the normal metformin you shouldn't have too many side effects. I don't want to be a downer but normal metformin brings with it a vast range of side effects that can range from mild to severe, so be prepared for a bit of a settling in period with it.

#14 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 14 February 2012 - 10:23 AM

Hi, I was on metformin, one a day, as part of a strategy to help me conceive (PCOS), which it did. My OB advised me to stay on the metformin the entire pregnancy, in his opinion it helped reduce the risk of miscarrying in the early months ( specific to my condition - he wasn't saying it is effective in reducing early miscarriage across the board) , I passed the GTT at 28 weeks ( just) but failed it at 34 weeks, I slipped over to GD and he upped my metformin in take to three a day, I had an upset tummy for a few days and (TMI) some no 2 issues, although these issues counter balanced the constipation I was otherwise suffering due to iron tablets etc so it kind of worked out! Subsequent testing showed my bsl to be good, so the increased metformin worked. Little Charlie was born on 2/2/12 weighing 2990 grams (so not big by any means), by c section but that was actually unrelated to my GD, he was monitored for blood sugars, all but one reading was good, he had one low reading and the midwives persuaded me to consent to comping with formula - that's a whole other story...he vomitte it up anyway. He is fine and feeding well now, I can't see any negative impact my metformin had on him...I have no qualms about taking it throughout my pregnancy. HTH.

#15 surprizzzed

Posted 19 February 2012 - 12:10 PM

Hello, I am new to GDM.  My Glucose Tolerance Test results were 4.4 (fasting), 8.0 (I hr) and 8.3 (2 hrs).  

I have been keeping track of my BLS for about 10 days now.  

I have only had a couple outside of the range (aiming for under 5 first thing in the morning, and under 7 two hrs after meals).  Once I had had a large "supper" with 3 carb exchanges and got 5.5 in the morning.  Another time I was really stressed/anxious/hot and out shopping and just over 7.

This morning I got my under 5 first thing in the morning, then had my usual toast for breakfast but with marmalade instead of vegemite (although I have had marmalade a couple of times with no problem).  Usually after breakfast I am getting the kids ready for school, rushing to work, walking from the car to the office etc but today I went back to bed for an extra rest.  

My reading after 2 hours was 7.3  sad.gif   I wasn't sure whether to have carbs for morning tea with that reading so half an hour later I tested again and got 4.5.  In between the 2 tests I did some light housework.  What do you make of this difference in reading after the 30mins? A bit worried that this means my insulin levels are getting a bit erratic!

#16 PleaseBeAdvised

Posted 19 February 2012 - 12:25 PM

Hi there Surprizzed,

I have found my levels are also really unpredictable, and getting more unpredictable as time goes on. My diabetes specialist at the hospital said this is to be expected, so I wouldn't stress about it.

I notice you are thinking of cutting carbohydrates when you have high readings. I don't know if this is recommended. Again, my diabetes specialist said that we need carbos to survive, and they are especially important during pregnancy, so to always make sure you are eating the intake recommended by the dietician. Make sure you make your diet and exercise regime the best you can make it: if your levels are wonky despite this, I expect an intervention is required.

You sound as though you are doing very well though!!

ETA thank you for all your advice regarding metformin. Like a PP I was also medicated with metformin for the first 3 mths to avoid m/c and was medicated prior to pregnancy for insulin resistance. Metformin doesn't appear to be working for me, as my fasting levels continue to climb (day levels are, as usual, within boundaries).

Edited by ChiaraB, 19 February 2012 - 12:27 PM.


#17 MickeyBoo

Posted 19 February 2012 - 07:16 PM

QUOTE (surprizzzed @ 19/02/2012, 12:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My reading after 2 hours was 7.3  sad.gif   I wasn't sure whether to have carbs for morning tea with that reading so half an hour later I tested again and got 4.5.  In between the 2 tests I did some light housework.  What do you make of this difference in reading after the 30mins? A bit worried that this means my insulin levels are getting a bit erratic!


Sometimes if I get a particularly high reading that seems unusual I go back re-wash my hands just with warm water and retest, it's amazing the residues that can stay on your skin, oranges are the worst for me the juice just hangs around. But it's also likely that the marmalade set it off, what is the sugar/carb content in it, and how much of a serve did you have?

Exercise normally elevates the levels for a little while afterwards but will have a greater effect on the overall readings throughout the day or your overnight reading.

Your levels should be rising and falling steadily, a sudden drop to 4.5 would normally indicate that you've had more of a high GI fast burning food that has shot your levels up and then had a drastic fall, instead of with Low GI foods they rise and fall at a steady pace. Here is an example on a graph that we were shown at the hospital... The question is just how your body us processing these things, you could have tested at the 2 hour mark and been right at the top of the spike.



and a link to the page that the info came from about carbs and how they work with GI ratings etc actually some good basic info that will help you understand how it all works anyway original.gif

http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/carbohydrates_gi.html

It's important that you eat at least 1 serve of carb at snack time, by the time you get to your snack it should be about the 2 hour mark after your meal so you should know where your levels have dropped to and judge from there. If it's a fast drop like you had then eating at least the 2 serves of carbs is really important to make sure that you don't have a hypo, if it's a slow drop and your system isn't processing it as it should then making the snack more protein based and having 1 serve of carbs will make sure that it tides you over to the next meal.

If it were me I would avoid the marmalade. I have no problems with vegemite, but the minute I have peanut butter or cheesespread they bounce right up there. Grilled cheese or poached eggs on toast is another brekkie option that should have good effect on your levels.

Edited by MickeyBoo, 19 February 2012 - 07:18 PM.


#18 PleaseBeAdvised

Posted 19 February 2012 - 08:21 PM

MickeyBoo - that was really helpful! Cheers!

#19 surprizzzed

Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:07 PM

Thanks for the graph and link M  original.gif

QUOTE (MickeyBoo @ 19/02/2012, 08:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
But it's also likely that the marmalade set it off, what is the sugar/carb content in it, and how much of a serve did you have?


The marmalade had 2.96g per tsp and I guess I had 2 tsp plus 2 slices low GI bread plus a cup of milk or more  with my skim decaf latte.

If you get a reading above 7 and it is time for morning/afternoon tea do you still go ahead and eat? If so, do you still include carbs?


#20 surprizzzed

Posted 20 February 2012 - 06:53 AM

Got a 5.3 this morning. Was disappointed! I'd had an extra Forme yoghurt for supper last night!
I decided to test another finger immediately afterwards, and got 3.8.  What do you make of this?

In the past few days I have started a new jar of testing sticks. I have always cleaned my fingers with Diabet-exy wipes and have just switched to drying my fingers from Kleenex with Aloe Vera to plain
Sorbent tissues.

I have an appointment with the endocrinologist tomorrow. Should I bother to call the diabetes education clinic today?

#21 MickeyBoo

Posted 20 February 2012 - 07:57 AM

The sugar is not overly high in the marmalade, but it still could have had an effect, peanut butter is the same for me my brand has 2.7gm per tbsp serve and my levels come back at 7.1 after eating it. Perhaps measure out two actual teaspoons of marmalade and see if you've underestimated your serving size, 2 teaspoons isn't very much at all and wouldn't cover much. Do you usually have that much milk? That could have an effect on things as well.

If I were to get a reading of 7 I would still have carb at morning tea, but it would be 1x15gm serve, and I'd have more proteins to bulk it up if I was hungry. If you're not that hungry then a little snack box of almonds is the perfect thing for those kind of situations, you can get them at Aldi for 69c each I think?

Were you having any kind of hypo effect with the morning readings? You should be feeling some signs of it with a reading that low, if not then I would take it as a false reading and go with the 5.3.

I know that if I prick my finger and leave the blood out on my fingertip for just a few seconds it can lower the reading dramatically, was it all set up ready to go when you tested?

Is the machine new? Has it been recalibrated when you started the new test strips?

I use the Diabetes Wipes too, but just let my finger air dry, not that using a plain tissue should have any effect, but you never know!

When I first started testing I discovered that some fingers would give a high reading, others would give a normal laughing2.gif I played around a bit and tested each finger in a row, the readings weren't consistent and were up to 0.7 points in difference wacko.gif I spoke to my diabetes educator about it, who told me off for testing like that LOL, and she said that she had heard it was fairly common and to just stick to one or two fingers and that's it. No other explanation given. I avoid my thumbs as they are always high and use my second and middle fingers each time, they seem to give the most consistent reading.

Not much help I know! I would just mention it to them and get them to have a look at your machine and make sure it's working ok, I'd also just stick to the 'test once' rule and stick with that initial reading, unless it's ridiculously high or low and doesn't seem right.

Edited by MickeyBoo, 20 February 2012 - 08:02 AM.


#22 surprizzzed

Posted 20 February 2012 - 08:47 AM

Thanks again M   original.gif

QUOTE
Were you having any kind of hypo effect with the morning readings?
I was hungry but dont think I was having a hypo effect.  I don't think I've ever experienced a hypo effect.  Not sure what it is TBH.

My 5.3 this morning was from my thumb.  I was thinking that this was high for fasting but checked my book and the limit is actually 5.5.  I've just never had a reading above 5 in the morning except for the time I had 3 carb exchanges for supper (little party for one involving a movie on the couch and 40g of pretzels in addition to my normal Forme yoghurt wink.gif )

I have left a message for the diabetes educator this morning.

#23 ssj

Posted 20 February 2012 - 11:45 AM

I find it absolutely fascinating that different fingers give different results! And that leaving the blood on the finger for a few seconds can have such an effect. Our bodies are amazing. And weird.

Sorry, nothing helpful to add here, just needed to express that... :-) Surprizzzed, I've only been diagnosed about the same amount of time as you. Lucky we have all these other ladies with a wealth of experience to advise us! Thank you all!

Back to the diabetes clinic for me tomorrow morning. First time since the initial visit. Hopefully they'll be pleased with only one reading too high. Ultrasound, too, so will get some idea of the baby's growth. My aim at the moment is to manage the GD to the extent that I get to keep my baby with me in the ward, and not have him go to special care at all.

#24 surprizzzed

Posted 20 February 2012 - 07:51 PM

QUOTE (ssj @ 20/02/2012, 12:45 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Lucky we have all these other ladies with a wealth of experience to advise us! Thank you all!
Totally agree!

QUOTE (ssj @ 20/02/2012, 12:45 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Back to the diabetes clinic for me tomorrow morning. First time since the initial visit. Hopefully they'll be pleased with only one reading too high. Ultrasound, too, so will get some idea of the baby's growth. My aim at the moment is to manage the GD to the extent that I get to keep my baby with me in the ward, and not have him go to special care at all.
Good luck!  I'm seeing the obstetrician tomorrow.

I spoke to the diabetes educator on the phone today about the different readings from differen fingers and she had no explanation. She suggested I call the manufacturer.

#25 MickeyBoo

Posted 21 February 2012 - 07:33 AM

SSJ Good luck with your appointment today and your scan, hope all goes well. I've been able to keep both my bubs with me after birth and I was insulin dependant for the whole pregnancies, my second birth was undiagnosed GD and she had to go to special care, but I've found my hospital is pretty good with letting you keep them near you. I'm hoping things turn out the same way for this one and she doesn't need special care as well original.gif 3 weeks till I get a sizing scan and get to see bub again, can't wait!

Good luck at the OB too suprizzzed

Edited by MickeyBoo, 21 February 2012 - 07:34 AM.





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When you're at work you sort of assume that your house is basically just sitting there quietly doing nothing until you return. However, since spending my days at home, I've learned this couldn't be further from the truth.

The words I hated hearing as new mum

It was less than a week after my son was born that I first heard it - from my mother.

To the pharmacist who sold me baby formula

On the rare occasion I catch sight of you at school, or around town, I think back to our earliest exchange. I?m sure you have no recollection of it at all.

Babies may benefit from autism therapy

Children showing signs of autism don't usually receive early intervention until well into toddlerhood or later, but a new study suggests infants with symptoms of the developmental disorder might benefit from therapy from as early as six months.

Knatalye and Adeline born with an everlasting bond

Knatalye Hope and Adeline Faith are a lot like any other identical twin girls, but there is one dramatic difference: they're joined at the chest and shares several internal organs.

The question this dad wishes he'd asked his wife

I should have seen that my wife wasn't the same person I'd fallen in love with, but we were both too focused on simply trying to get by.

Why we should talk about the deaths of the Hunt children

The deaths are too horrible even to think about. Yet we owe it to the children - Fletcher, Mia and Phoebe Hunt - to think long and hard about it all.

Baby dies of meningococcal weeks after vaccine application denied

A six-month-old girl has died from meningococcal disease just weeks after an application for government funding of a vaccine for the most deadly strain of the virus was rejected.

Finding the right balance when playing with your kids

Being too involved in our children?s play and not allowing our kids enough free time for unstructured activities can mean our kids miss out on the value that play offers.

Creative DIY light shades

The Pop Light light shade comes in a flat pack already made - it's up to you to design it as you'd like.

The battle of iParenting versus imagination

Have we forgotten how to be imaginative, resourceful parents?

Why movement is so important for your baby's growth

Letting your child move as much as possible in the early years ? using all senses, engaging in the real world, preferably outside ? will help them grow up healthier, smarter, calmer and stronger.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
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Special offer: The Baby & Toddler Show 2014

At The Baby & Toddler Show, you?ll find everything you need to get ready for your new arrival and guide you through the early weeks and years of parenting.

Losing yourself to motherhood

While watching your baby grow into a unique little person is exciting and wondrous, the intensity of meeting everyone else?s needs can ever so sneakily overtake your own needs for self-care.

Tearing during delivery: the facts

Almost all women will experience bruising, grazing or tearing after a vaginal birth. Depending on the degree of tearing, there are various treatments available.

6 tips for a day out with a baby and toddler

Outings can be lots of fun with the kids, but there are inevitable challenges. Here's some information about days out to help you be a little more prepared.

Why I invited a dozen people to watch my son's birth

I sent invitations on burgundy scrapbooking paper stamped with a field of poppies, and told each person why I wanted him or her there. I warned that there would be nudity.

Getting labour started: tips for a natural induction

When your baby?s due date comes and goes without so much as a pop - let alone a bang - it can be disheartening. Mums and a doula share their stories of natural inductions.

7 mistakes old hands make with new babies

As I sat across the table from my friend ? me, a seasoned mother of three; her, a brand new mum ? I thought of all the mistakes an old-hand parent can make when visiting a newborn baby.

That's my boy: a dad's diary of the first 4 months

Unbearable anxiety, unspeakable joy, constant exhaustion and bouts of frustration ... The many shocks of first-time fatherhood resound in a dad's diary of his son's early months.

One of the most important things a new mum can do

Finances may not be as cute as a newborn, but with many women?s working arrangements changing post-baby, monetary matters need attention too.

Baby survives five days alone

He lay with his mother for up to five days after she died of a suspected drug overdose - and survived.

Personalised baby gifts

We've scoured the internet to find gorgeous personalised keepsakes and nursery decor to record baby name and dates. They make great gifts for christenings, name days and birthdays! (All prices in AU.)

 

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