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My 5wk old got sunburned :(


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#26 MrsDamonSalvatore

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:01 PM

just be careful cause not everything from wiki is so reliable :-/

Edited by amandajean91, 30 December 2011 - 05:02 PM.


#27 Soontobegran

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:03 PM

QUOTE (purpleblackqueen @ 30/12/2011, 05:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This.. A little one that young should not be out in the heat or sun.



FGS--I'm with peppersmum on this one.
Just when you think EB can't get any more vicious-it does. sad.gif

My eldest DD got wind/sunburnt in her pram when she was about 3 weeks old---we were walking in the heat and the sun---YES PBQ, a double dose.
It was 26 degrees on a lovely sunny day and we went for a walk, the beige coloured lining of the pram hood reflected the light and she got pink, in fact she even got a tiny blister on her cheek!

From that day on a put some sunscreen on her when we went out but imagine if Australian women only went out with their children on overcast days wink.gif

#28 samanthan

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:06 PM

Hey B, you poor thing! My DS2 got sunburned in a sling at DS1's birthday party at about 7 weeks old and I felt awful. He too never compained, and it didn't peel either, disappearing a day or so later except for one ear which peeled a tiny bit. I just used a bit of breastmilk when I fed him. Hope E's disappears quickly and don't beat yourself up xx

#29 Soontobegran

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:07 PM

QUOTE (janedoe2010 @ 30/12/2011, 05:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You can't get windburn, it doesn't exist. Your nurse needs an education. Sad when even Wiki knows and the nurse doesn't.  rolleyes.gif  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windburn

Aside from that, I hope your baby sleeps ok. Sunburn is awful and can happen so quickly and sometimes we just don't realise it. sad.gif



Actually windburn is sunburn that is accelerated by the wind. People call it windburn because it often shows up on overcast days with high wind and whilst it is actually sunburn the wind does have some impact!

#30 Guest_janedoe2010_*

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:08 PM

QUOTE (amandajean91 @ 30/12/2011, 06:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
just be careful cause not everything from wiki is so reliable :-/


Look for yourself if you don't want to rely on Wiki. In this case, they're right. As supported by all the other information available with a quick Google. I just linked Wiki as it was quick and concise to read.

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 30/12/2011, 06:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Actually windburn is sunburn that is accelerated by the wind. People call it windburn because it often shows up on overcast days with high wind and whilst it is actually sunburn the wind does have some impact!


Yes, but it is actually SUNburn. The wind does not burn.

#31 idignantlyright

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:11 PM

QUOTE (amandajean91 @ 30/12/2011, 06:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
just be careful cause not everything from wiki is so reliable :-/

Yes it is, everyone knows Wiki is 100% truthfull  biggrin.gif

#32 idignantlyright

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:14 PM

QUOTE (janedoe2010 @ 30/12/2011, 06:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Look for yourself if you don't want to rely on Wiki. In this case, they're right. As supported by all the other information available with a quick Google. I just linked Wiki as it was quick and concise to read.



Yes, but it is actually SUNburn. The wind does not burn.

If you want to get really really technical, it isn't even the sun. It is the wind that causes chaffing and dries the skin out making it look as though it is burnt.

#33 Soontobegran

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:16 PM

QUOTE (janedoe2010 @ 30/12/2011, 06:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yes, but it is actually SUNburn. The wind does not burn.


The burn is accelerated by the wind---thus it is reasonable to call it 'windburn'. I don't think there are many people who would believe the wind alone causes the burn.

#34 WinterIsComing

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:19 PM

QUOTE (Cadie @ 30/12/2011, 01:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Seriously if thats in reply to what I wrote  rolleyes.gif . I didnt ask you to 'clarify' and theres no need to get catty and defensive because you feel bad. As many posters have said, its a mistake that many of us have made - even me.
What I meant was a newborn shouldnt be out in the heat because they cant regulate their temp yet and its very easy for them to overheat. I certainly wasnt suggesting you were 'sunbaking on a tin roof in coconut oil'  huh.gif

Babies/people can get sunburnt in many different conditons, thats why I suggested the use of sun cream next time even if you dont think its likely they will get burnt. You can burnt through a car window, from the wind (wind burn), from the snow so seriously chill out.

And yes it isnt possible to stay home all the time with a newborn and requires leaving the house but I dont know what that has to do with anything I wrote rolleyes.gif

oh and if you re-read it there was some good advice in there - keep skin cool, keep burnt skin out of sun until it heals at least, and use lots of moisture.

To the pp who said maybe there was no air con I mean seriously does that mean you should camp out all day outside? no you find a reasonable and safe alternative. I've been there done that. I went to a friends house, some people go to the shopping centre, or stay at home with wet towels and fans. Even so thats a completely different topic and has nothing to do with this posters post because from what we know it wasnt the case.

sheesh


Wow. Your eyes must be on the back of your head with all that eye rolling.
Your 'advice' is still impractical and unhelpful. Seriously, camping out at friend's houses and shopping centres?  If you read SIDS advice carefully, they stress that natural air temperature is NOT a risk factor. The baby DOES NOT need an air conditioner to reduce risk. And not taking children outside - serously? So, people living in the tropics should only ever move from an airconditioned house to an airconditioned car?

Edited by lucky 2, 30 December 2011 - 09:54 PM.
r/o personal attack


#35 RachealJane

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:20 PM

bebe2 - when my DD got sunburnt for the first time it looked shocking. It was also just under her eyes and it got redder and redder as the evening progressed i felt so awful too.

I just remember making sure i washed her face as soon as i noticed with some cool water and then applying some cream (maybe even sunscreen) once or twice and by the morning it was hardly even there anymore.

Best of luck!

#36 Guest_Cathode_*

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:23 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 30/12/2011, 03:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Actually windburn is sunburn that is accelerated by the wind. People call it windburn because it often shows up on overcast days with high wind and whilst it is actually sunburn the wind does have some impact!

yyes.gif

The wind passing over the skin makes it feel cooler than doesn't alert to the burning feeling usually associated with sun burning. hence the "Wind burn". It is not caused by the wind, but the wind is why they don't notice it is happening.

It can also accelerate it by stripping the top layers of natural oils and helping leave the skin more vulnerable.

Edited by Cathode, 30 December 2011 - 05:24 PM.


#37 Guest_Cathode_*

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:27 PM

Oh, forgot to say - OP - I swear by the Aloe Mist spray here http://bananaboat.com.au/products/after-sun/ most pharmacies and Coles sell it. I keep it in the fridge to make it nice and icy.

#38 Sassenach2

Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:31 PM

Woolworths have it too.

#39 Miss Kiwi

Posted 30 December 2011 - 07:23 PM

QUOTE (purpleblackqueen @ 30/12/2011, 05:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This.. A little one that young should not be out in the heat or sun.


And clearly you can't read as the OP stated twice that the baby was in the SHADE not the sun!

I hope you and your bub feel better soon OP original.gif

#40 anotherebmember

Posted 30 December 2011 - 07:25 PM

glad to hear u took ur little one to ur nurse.

My DD4 got sunburnt for the first time last week (yes she is alot older then ur little one) but I still felt terrible.

And yes, EB is full of "helpful" comments. OP wasn't asking anyone to criticise her for making an error of judgement, she was asking for some constructive advise on how to help her little girl now the damage had been done.

Geez..... we r all human, she didnt smother her baby in coconut oil and take her to the beach to sunbake for a tan.  blink.gif

OP I hope ur little girl is doing ok and Im sure ur thread has been a timely reminder to all of those with kids to ensure they are sunsafe.

#41 Mrs.Brown

Posted 30 December 2011 - 07:53 PM


QUOTE
Actually I had two summer babies and one winter baby. I never said to keep the kid indoors nor did I criticize her for her baby getting sunburned.
Here i'll be more specific. I dont think babies that young should be out in the heat for long, certainly not long enough to get burnt. Thats my opinion. I also followed up with that comment in a following post saying that newborns cannot regulate their temp so thats just one of the reasons I think that way.


I have been outside, on a cooler day when it has been windy and been windburned in a matter of 15 minutes. Seriously, as parents we can take all precautions but occasionally something is going to happen that isnt in the perfect parent list.

QUOTE
I think its a pretty bad mistake though and I wouldnt expect anyone to be okay with it.
It was an accident! Leave this new mum alone.

#42 threelittlegems

Posted 30 December 2011 - 07:59 PM

QUOTE
I second the delete your post comment.

Im not one to judge but a 5 week old shouldnt be out in the heat anyway (even if under a shade). And next time use sun cream.

Keep bub out the sun. The skin keeps burning even after your out of the sun with a sun burn. Try to keep her skin cool to prevent blistering, and moisturise it lots maybe with a sorbolene, something plain.

xo


Cadie, your original comment wasn't so bad. A bit blunt, but not worth getting up in arms about.

But the follow up posts haven't helped your cause  biggrin.gif  It's not worth getting into silly debates and  rolleyes.gif over some topics.

Just a bit of advice

xx



#43 mrs

Posted 30 December 2011 - 08:15 PM

I would just keep doing cool water compresses with a damp cloth and not use any creams.



#44 TwiceTheWoman

Posted 30 December 2011 - 08:24 PM

QUOTE (mrs @ 30/12/2011, 09:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would just keep doing cool water compresses with a damp cloth and not use any creams.

^^^Same +1

(babies burn very easily - I've seen them at work with Mums who had their babies in strollers going to the local milk bar)

Keep some soft "CHUX" in a basin of cool water to bathe her little face.
All the best but if you're remotely concerned see your dr.


#45 lilsunniegirl

Posted 30 December 2011 - 08:31 PM

all I can say is wow... what happened to this thread?!

I just popped back in to see how the OP got on with her LO

EB floors me sometimes..

OP hope all is well with your LO and glad you got hold of the nurse.

#46 Sasha Jensen

Posted 30 December 2011 - 08:39 PM


OP I hope your little one is happy and well and you are feeling better now.

Edited by lucky 2, 31 December 2011 - 12:41 PM.


#47 Mumto1feral

Posted 30 December 2011 - 08:51 PM

I think posters have already made some good suggestions about how to soothe the sunburn.

But just a tip for prevention, perhaps check the UV index for that day, as temperature and cloud cover do not always reflect risk.

Shade doesn't offer that much protection as well.
QUOTE
</a>Why do I still get sunburnt in the shade?
Total UV radiation present at a given location = direct UV + indirect UV.

Shade forms a barrier between you and the sun, which protects you from direct UV radiation. You may still get enough exposure to cause sunburn from indirect UV radiation, however.  A general rule of thumb is that if you can see a lot of sky then UV radiation can reach you.


<a href="http://" target="_blank">
Why do I still get sunburnt on a cloudy day?
It is possible for UV radiation to pass through clouds. The amount of UV radiation that gets through depends on how thick the clouds are. Heavy cloud reduces UV levels. UV levels on lightly overcast days can be similar to that of a cloud-free day. UV levels rise and fall as clouds pass in front of the sun on a day of scattered cloud. On a cloudy day, try checking the real time UV graph to see the effects.


http://www.sunsmart.com.au/ultraviolet_rad...v/faqs_about_uv

Edited by Mumto1bub, 30 December 2011 - 08:53 PM.


#48 lucky 2

Posted 30 December 2011 - 10:28 PM

I have removed some posts and edited others for breaches of the forum rules.

lucky 2
Moderator




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