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Gifted & Talented Primary Years #24


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#176 *bucket*

Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:00 PM

Delurking.

After a lot of thought, I've decided to have DS2 IQ tested. Unfortunately the paed also suggested having him ASD assessed as well. I am quietly reeling. This is my "normal" child, my "average" one (DS1 has HFA and is gifted, DD has ADHD and many ASD traits). DS2 is 7. I should have known before now. I know he is bright, he always has been. But ASD didn't occur to me, not until I had two different people call him "quirky" within a week. That alarmed me, and it has snowballed from there.

We are booked in with a psychologist I am happy with (she did DS1s Grade 6 assessment) in May, so not too long to wait. She was really thorough and gave us great suggestions to help with transition from primary school to high school.

Which IQ test would she use? Is there a common one to use at age 7? I will be happy to find out his strengths and weaknesses, so am looking forward to that result.

Re sharing with the school, I'm not sure if we will or not. They already recognise that he is bright, and ahead of the others, but he resists attempts at extension. They try to give him work that is more at his level, but he "can't be bothered thinking". Bright but reluctant. He would rather do readers because "they are easy", even though he is well beyond them. Not sure how we will get him to use his intellect should he be shown to have some.

Does anyone else have a child that refuses to work? (DS2 won't write either). I know a lot of you mention that the school isn't being cooperative with providing appropriate work, but our school does, it's the child that won't do it. Anyone relate?

Best wishes to all.

#177 baddmammajamma

Posted 15 April 2012 - 07:23 PM

Sorry I've been so slack on this thread. Autism Awareness Month seems to have consumed most of my EB energies. wink.gif

inthearmsofsleep, congrats on the wonderful test results! Glad you guys had such a positive experience with GMs.

LucyE: Will PM you those sites (and anyone else who is interested).

Michaelmichelle: We shared the entire report with J's school -- mainly because we trusted how they would use the information. Also, so many kids at her school have been tested by GMs that we wanted the school to be able to compare/contrast/calibrate. My daughter's scores were really high all across the board, so we didn't have to worry about "interpretation" either. However, depending on the school, the level of familiarity with giftedness, the appetite for learning more, I could see why a parent might only share an extract. Fortunately, the way the GMs report is written, you could easily segment it.

bucket: Hey there. Wow, I bet your head is spinning. We ended up going with the SB-V, instead of the WISC-IV (those of the two you are likely to be offered). Our only reason was because Gifted Minds tests with the SB-V. My understanding is the the WISC-IV is far more common in Australia, so your son's school might be more familiar with it.

I really hope that things go well with your assessment. I have a soft spot for complex kids, but I can appreciate the desire to know what it feels like to parent a nice average kid. wink.gif

We have had some compliance issues with our daughter this year at school. We use a lot of positive reinforcement, scorecards (behavioral checklists), and limited options ("You can choose THIS or THIS, but you must choose one.") We are also bringin' in the big guns this term, in the form of the Sr. Behavioral Specialist who ran my daughter's early intervention program years ago, to do some special consults with her teacher & the head of the Gifted and Talented program. We also have a (private) shadow in the classroom, chiefly to cover the times during the week that are likely to be the biggest challenge for my daughter. For instance, she is the lone girl in the G&T maths class, and as a result, is a bit reluctant to go and participate. Having someone there to help get her over the little bumps really helps!

Happy to "talk" more by PM.

#178 happy2bme

Posted 17 April 2012 - 08:16 PM

Hi all,

Ive been MIA trying to get my head around a few things & we also had a big move.

I have to say we have had a really good start to the school year - DS1 has settled in really well to a new school & teacher. I was a bit hesitant initially as his teacher is quite young however she is fantastic & really clicks with DS1.  We havent had any of the behavioural issues from last year.

So we had parent teacher today & the teacher reported that he is doing really well with most things - reading & writing still a bit of an issue though but he is progressing so she is happy with that.  One thing that i found interesting - we hadnt told her about his IQ testing etc but she made mention that his comprehension is fantastic but his written assessments dont reflect his comprehension however he tests very well verbally.  

For those who dont remember - DS's IQ test results indicated that he is highly gifted in comprehension/lanuage (GLC) but average FSIQ.  So i dont know if there is a problem linking the 2 & whether we should investigate or let things pan out??

Overall I am pleased with his new teacher & feel she is working well with him rather than against him

#179 theypullthestrings

Posted 18 April 2012 - 02:12 PM

Hi I was hoping it would be ok to come in here and ask for an opinion. It has just been suggested (by a friend - no expert) that I get DD age 9 tested. It is something I've not considered before and knew very little about but have done some research. I'd been interested if others would give their opinion on whether or not they think testing would be relevant or helpful to us understanding our daughter a bit better as she is due to start a new school next year and we have had many concerns in the past. She sits performance wise at school somewhere about 3/4s of the way through the class so we've always considered her to be above average but nothing exceptional. On the other hand we've always been astounded by what you might call her EQ...her maturity and understanding of social interaction is way ahead of her peers and she much prefers the company of adults to children her own age. She has had many social issues at school that staff have put down to her not being able to see things at the same level as her peers but acknowledging she usually approaches disagreements/ group interaction from a logical/ more mature perspective than the others. However she recently sat some academic tests that put her in stanine 8 for maths (she says she can't do maths at all and struggles and her teacher last year told us it was a weakness for her) and high stanine 9 for all literacy based tests (same teacher last year told us she was very verbal (indicated mouthy) and not as clever as she thinks she is). She had a terrible time at school last year (has never loved school but this was the worst by far) and we worried she was almost becoming depressed about school and assumed it was a social thing but without teacher support in either academics or social issues we sat out the year hoping for a better experience this year. She is much happier this year as she has a teacher who really gets her in a social sense and is making her feel good about herself but now we have these academic results we have thought maybe a little bit more is going on in the classroom. Would testing be of help to us do you think? Thankyou in advance from someone with little knowledge in this area.

#180 Michaelmichelle

Posted 18 April 2012 - 02:30 PM

Has anyone wonder with the testing iq score, will our child iq level remains throughout or will they decreases?

Does anybody know what is the iq score to skip a grade in WA?

Our school testing is lower than the iq score itself.

Does a child still have to undergo gifted entry in year 5 for a gifted program when we have already have an iq test?

#181 Sue Heck

Posted 18 April 2012 - 06:34 PM

O

Edited by Helen Magnus, 03 May 2012 - 12:50 AM.


#182 mum of monkey

Posted 20 April 2012 - 06:09 AM

Hi Everyone,

I am new to this website and am very grateful to have found such an active thread.... This is only my second post, although it is the same as the other one blush.gif
I put this post on here last night, but i have now found a "gifted" thread, so i am putting it on here now.....

So here is my story and questions,

I am a SAHM of 3 wonderful children,
My oldest child dd has been tested and is gifted, we have had the WPPSI-III, SOI and the Stanford Binet testing done.
On the WPPSI she scored overall 95% (Superior)
on SOI, 98.6% IQ 137+ (overall Total Stanine Score 90)
And i have misplaced the stanford binet test but she came in the Second from the top level.

My dd is currently 6 and a half , we initially had the WPPSI test done so we could gain early entry into NSW school as she is born in August.
We were knocked back on Social and Emotion development, and then moved to QLD, When she was 5 and a half she started Prep in a compisite prep one class, which she handled fine but was bored. This school also would not offer any extention, enrichment at all..... so we had to change school.

This year we changed schools after being granted a grade skip, but as there was only 2 schools we could find willing to do this, it limited our options.
She is currently in a multi age 2/3 class, and is extending into the year 3 curriculum.
She is also having trouble making friends. She is making some friends, but she feels extremely deeply, so, if someone doesn't play with her she get emotional, she also told me the year 3 kids are telling her that she is too young to be reading chapter books and told me thismorning that she isnt going to read the books she has been anymore and go back to easier reading so they dont get " Jelous or upset" (her words) that they are not able to read like her. She has also started to say she doesnt want to go to school in the mornings, where we have always had her wanting to go....

My ds is 5,
we have not had him tested yet as he is unable to read or write ( so i thought) until today, i had a parent teacher interview and was told he showed ALOT of the traits my dd has..... And that he is good at maths..... and extremely emotional.
He didn't walk or talk until he was 18 months old.... but spoke sentences instead of words when he started to talk.

My youngest is dd 18 months old,
She walks and is starting to talk, is Extremely curious and independant... understands everything you say to her and loves to dance.

My kids go to two different schools on different sides of the city, as there was no vacancies for my son in Prep in my daughters school.
School drop off and pick up is a nightmare.

Two days ago i found a school not far from me, that has a gifted program, (selective) using one of the tests i have already had done... Has multi age/ composite classes the whole way through from prep to year 12 p/1, 2/3, 4/5 ect... It is a small school ( 200 Kids about)

Now, my kids schools they are currently in are fantastic, but i cant do the commute next year as they both finish at the same time ( this year the prep classs finishes early)

My sons school will take my daughter in year 3 next year, but doesnt have anything but a learning support officer.... no gifted program, extention, enrichment ect...

My Daughters school has no vacancies for my son at the moment and he is on the waiting list ( how long for, i dont know)

The school i have just found can take both kids, dd in 2/3 and ds in p/1. they have availability and the gifted program.

My questions are............

1) If you were in my shoes, would you move them both or hope that a position comes up at dd school?

2)if you did move them, would you do it immediatly, at the end of the term or the end of the year? ( My husband says now, because of two reasons, first, he is worried she will hide her abilities to fit in, and second, we can do it when the uniforms change to winter uniforms ( so not having to buy books, summer uniform and winter uniform straight up) The uniform changes on 8th may.

3) I have no Formal way of showing that she has been grade skipped, it was all done verbally with the current and last years school principal, and the department of catholic education. As this new school is not a catholic school, how do i show that she has actually been grade skipped since the beggining of the year?

3) Any suggestions?

#183 *bucket*

Posted 25 April 2012 - 04:27 PM

Thanks for your help and suggestions to me.

These articles were in the Age (Victoria) on Monday. I didn't even know there was an enquiry into gifted education happening, but I will be interested in the results.

http://www.theage.com.au/national/educatio...0420-1xc9f.html

http://www.theage.com.au/national/educatio...0420-1xc94.html

My mother called me after reading the first one to make sure I read it as she said it described my DS2 perfectly.

There was a box in the paper listing early signs of giftedness, I couldn't find it online so I have typed it out below:

*a high level of alertness
*an unwillingness to sleep
*single mindedness
*deep engagement in play for sustained periods
*speaking in sentences earlier than peers
*a deep interest in watching and learning from others
*stong passions or interests
*reading before school
*lack of social connection with peers
*preference for adult company
*wanting to do things perfectly
*displays of high-level creativity
*breaking abstract word and letter codes
*a love of strategic games, such as chess
*making unexpected verbal connections
*curiosity about numbers and mathematics

I was interested some of these could overlap with ASD? Does anyone else think that?

Do your children "fit" with the list? (I don't think they are supposed to have everything). I can see some of these signs in DS1 (who has been tested and is also ASD) and DS2 (who is being tested in a few weeks).

#184 lunargirl

Posted 01 May 2012 - 05:09 PM

Hi everyone original.gif

This is probably a vent more than anything, but anyway...it follows on from a session aimed at parents at our school today, which made me feel my child is a freak. I didn't want to vent in the venting section for precisely the reasons listed below!

I'm feeling so frustrated at how totally focused our school seems to be on reading recovery and struggling readers. OBVIOUSLY children who are having trouble need extra help, so I'm not wanting to detract from their requirements at all. But there is never *any* mention of kids who are ahead of the 8 ball. Never! I am SURE my Yr 1 child is not the only bookworm or super-keen learner in the school but there is never any guidance about what we should be doing with our children at home. It's all about how to encourage your child to read their reader to you, how to sound out words, how to decode texts and so on.  DD1 is reading at a Yr 5 level, reads the atlas & dictionary for fun...you know how it is. Of course I am super proud of her, but I DO have questions about her education and how to help her at home, and I feel I can't ask them without sounding like a w*n*er. Especially as today her teacher (who is the school literacy coordinator) mentioned that her own son is a reluctant reader.

Not to mention the fact that you can't really express any concerns to other parents without sounding like you are bragging; let alone actually share in the joy of having a child who is doing well. So I don't even know who the other parents of smarty-pants kids are, to have a chat to!

Sigh.

Vent over.




#185 Michaelmichelle

Posted 02 May 2012 - 01:13 PM

Hi Lunargirl

You sounded like many of "us " here before our assessments. We are very relieved to have our child tested finally .Though we havent talk to anyone about it other than the school.

It hard to talk to a teacher without concrete evidence.

It didnt open any conversations for us in fact we went even under the radar knowing  the child is gifted its becomes unfair from our point of view now to compare to his own peers.

Am sure many will agree. Get tested. Someone here told me its painless and worthwhile and i heed the advice and never once look back.




#186 lunargirl

Posted 02 May 2012 - 02:03 PM

Hi Michaelmichelle

We're booked in for testing in a few weeks. I still don't really know if DD is "gifted" or just bright (though it will be nice to find out!), but even if she turns out to be on the higher end of average, it would be nice for the teachers to cater a little more for those students! It seems like they just assume they will "fend for themselves"  huh.gif

Edited by lunargirl, 02 May 2012 - 02:05 PM.


#187 Michaelmichelle

Posted 09 May 2012 - 10:18 PM

Can someone tell me what type of testing in WA year 4 which is the key entry to PEAC?( am sure it isnt Naplan)

#188 bluemonkey

Posted 10 May 2012 - 06:13 PM

Hi all,
Just came in to update that I finally got around to following up about getting the subset scores/fsiq etc and was flat out refused....... now I know why school's are not recommended.......will be following this up at a higher level as soon as the steam stops coming out my ears.... glare.gif

#189 gravity1

Posted 10 May 2012 - 08:41 PM

QUOTE (bluemonkey @ 10/05/2012, 06:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi all,
Just came in to update that I finally got around to following up about getting the subset scores/fsiq etc and was flat out refused....... now I know why school's are not recommended.......will be following this up at a higher level as soon as the steam stops coming out my ears.... glare.gif



Just out of interest, what is the reasoning behind schools not wanting to divulge info from IQ tests conducted by the school educational psychologist?


My son's teacher and I are still tossing up whether my son should be tested. Perhaps I am better leaving it and waiting until I can afford private testing?

#190 bluemonkey

Posted 10 May 2012 - 08:55 PM

QUOTE (proudmama1 @ 10/05/2012, 08:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Just out of interest, what is the reasoning behind schools not wanting to divulge info from IQ tests conducted by the school educational psychologist?

My son's teacher and I are still tossing up whether my son should be tested. Perhaps I am better leaving it and waiting until I can afford private testing?


Not recommended by the organisation the counsellor is registered with. I confirmed this with a friend who is a child psych.

I'm upset as I had concerns and had raised them prior to testing that we be given a full report etc. Obviously my idea of a full report differs to the counsellor's. No idea about the school, but they are the next logical step. I guess they are trying to protect the children who do have pushy unhinged parents, but seriously!

I understand that the number isn't what it is all about. I also suspect that with DDs results, I think there is something else going on. A 40+ difference in percentiles seems to be significant to me..... this was so not explained well in the report provided. And as the lower %ile is "average" it is not statistically significant.

Crumbs, I am not a statistician, but I am not questioning the result, I am seeking a deeper understanding so I can support my child in her learning years. I know its just a snapshot in time, but I still feel there is more about it.

Totally happy I have a high average child, totally happy I have a "normal" friendly, engaging daughter who is social, bright and behaving very well at the moment (really enjoying all this tthumbs.gif ).

As someone who is normally fairly articulate, I really struggle to put into words the concerns I still have. Its like I don't have all the pieces of the puzzle yet, and then when I went to find them, got shot down and told there is no puzzle, and why did I want those extra pieces anyway, as they weren't statistically significant.....or relevant... or what did I want to do with them...... sad.gif

#191 gravity1

Posted 11 May 2012 - 11:17 AM

QUOTE (bluemonkey @ 10/05/2012, 08:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Not recommended by the organisation the counsellor is registered with. I confirmed this with a friend who is a child psych.

I'm upset as I had concerns and had raised them prior to testing that we be given a full report etc. Obviously my idea of a full report differs to the counsellor's. No idea about the school, but they are the next logical step. I guess they are trying to protect the children who do have pushy unhinged parents, but seriously!

I understand that the number isn't what it is all about. I also suspect that with DDs results, I think there is something else going on. A 40+ difference in percentiles seems to be significant to me..... this was so not explained well in the report provided. And as the lower %ile is "average" it is not statistically significant.

Crumbs, I am not a statistician, but I am not questioning the result, I am seeking a deeper understanding so I can support my child in her learning years. I know its just a snapshot in time, but I still feel there is more about it.

Totally happy I have a high average child, totally happy I have a "normal" friendly, engaging daughter who is social, bright and behaving very well at the moment (really enjoying all this tthumbs.gif ).

As someone who is normally fairly articulate, I really struggle to put into words the concerns I still have. Its like I don't have all the pieces of the puzzle yet, and then when I went to find them, got shot down and told there is no puzzle, and why did I want those extra pieces anyway, as they weren't statistically significant.....or relevant... or what did I want to do with them...... sad.gif


If there are still concerns then I would be definitely following it up. Good luck. original.gif

#192 Cat's Pyjamas

Posted 16 May 2012 - 08:44 AM

Hello!  I hope you don't mind me posting/asking a question in here as my DD is not at school yet, but didn't want to start an 'is my child a genius' thread and get flamed as I do have genuine concerns about DD1 3.5 and was hoping some of you lovely ladies could offer guidance!

She has been clever since she was born, knew her alphabet before she was two, did puzzles from a very early age etc...

Now she is writing all her letters, knows their sounds and can sound out and write basic words.  She also knows many words by sight. She has an amazing memory, and taught herself to count to 10 in Spanish (thanks Dora) at just over two. She can count to 100, and to 20 in Spanish.  Also knows days of the week and can associate what happens on what day etc. She was drawing proper people from 3 as well.

On the flip side she is extremely sensitive.  I can't take her to an indoor playcentre as she is terrified of the air noises in there. She is scared of buses and trains and dogs and pretty much anything that makes noise. (Unless it is songs that she likes and she wants them loud and knows all the words..)  She won't sleep in her own bed, sleeps on a mattress on our floor and still wakes 3 times a night.

She is VERY demanding of my time.  I cannot leave her for 5 minutes without her demanding something (literally) or asking questions about why things do things etc.  we can't just bake together, she needs to read the scales and learn about 1/2 cup, 1/3 cup etc.

I am quite concerned already about her starting prep as she already knows more in terms of reading/writing/numbers than most of her prep friends.  I think she is going to go mental in prep and drive her teachers mad.

Sorry for the essay! Just after advice I guess of what to look for in a school, and any tips on parenting a child like this... bless her heart, but she is driving us bonkers with her sensitivity at the moment.

Thanks for reading!

#193 kh79

Posted 16 May 2012 - 04:29 PM

Cat's pjs - I am not sure if i can give really good advice because we have a little boy who is not at school yet either (same age as your little girl).

But I did want to say that your little one does sound incredibly bright and I know that its very hard to bring this stuff up on the generalcareas of this forum.  

I would say that she is certainly advanced and you are right to be thinking about how a school will be able to best catar for her.

We started our little one at a private school (the preschool part of the school) this year.  When we interviewed the school we went to the principal and put everything out there to be seen.  Our little one has a mild form of Autism and at the time suspected he was gifted. We told the principal about DS and watched and waited for his response to our very unusual child.  We wanted to see how he would respond to the good and the bad.  The principal was very thoughtful and asked many questions about our son and asked questions about what we wanted.  He knew off the top of his head how many children he had in the school with ASD and gave real examples of children who are gifted and how they were extended.  This impressed us a lot.

Our little one has settled in so well and is holding his own without a hiccup.

We've just had him tested to find his IQ is far beyond even we imagined so it will be interesting to see how the school is able to accommodate his needs.  I don't even know what that would look like.  I guess my point is though that I feel confident in the school that they will support us in every way and I feel certainly confident in that now I have that paperwork too.

I am not sure what to say in regards to being so far ahead and how your DD will fair in prep.  I am scared of this too.

Best of luck:)



#194 katrina24

Posted 17 May 2012 - 07:56 AM

Cat's PJs - my little girl (in year ) was quite similar to yours although perhaps not quite so sensitive to noise etc.  She does sound very clever.  We chose a school that used a developmental curriculum - this meant that the children could all work on the same topics/areas but with a different level.  For example, my DD did the same work on  procedures as the rest of the class - some kids did drawings only, some kids wrote a few words and DD wrote the full procedure.  She was reading more than 20 levels above the rest of the class for most of the year and noone would have known this (unless they did reading with the kids).  In maths she was removed for small group extension and given different homework to the rest of the class.  Some things surprised me, I was quite concerned about boredom etc but when the other kids were learning their letters (DD had known since she was 2 as well) DD insisted on having the same home learning book as the others.  Instead of just learning about the letters of the week we would spell different words starting with those letters.  Her teacher said to me that she wasn't going to give DD that homework book but DD insisted.  We thought about starting school early but she really benefited from the social aspects of kinder.  In year one she is still flying quite above her peers (and her peers in the grade above her I think) but she is not bored as the same approach is being taken.  For example, when the class are learning an addition strategy - they are adding single digit numbers and she is learning two and three digit numbers.  The school use homework activities to help with extension also - instead of the 10 maths questions the others get, she gets problem solving sheets that really extend her.  This is to work on her persistence - she was too used to things being very easy for her and wasn't developing persistence (she would give up immediately if something looked hard and she thought she would fail).  This approach has worked incredibly well for her and she is much more persistent.  They have also worked hard on her resilience.  So, for me, I would look for school policies around social/emotional development (persistence, resilience, good bullying policy) as I think this is more important for kids like ours.  A good attitude to extending kids is also important.  I don't think academic results of the school are as relevant because I feel like she'll be fine with her learning regardless but unless her social/emotional wellbeing is taken care of we could be in trouble.

Bluemonkey:  I'm surprised about your issues with the test results.  Statistical significance (in my understanding) when it comes to tests like these usually refers to the difference between test scores.  So, most IQ tests will give a verbal and a non-verbal score and these are combined to give an overall IQ score.  However, if there is a large enough gap between the verbal and non-verbal scores the overall score should not be calculated as it is deemed to be not a good indicator of skills (there is a statistically significant gap calculated for different tests).  Each overall score is made up by specific combinations of subtest scores - the little tasks that are completed in different areas.  Some tests will also give information about statistically significant differences between subtest scores - for example if a child scores subtest scores of 8, 9, 10 - skills are fairly consistent across the areas but if a child scores 5, 5, 12 you could assume that the overall score is  not representative of the child's abilities because they have poor skills with a splinter skill in one area - the overall score would be like an average of these scores and would not accurately represent the child's abilities.  I would imagine the professional association gives advice about reporting on scores that are appropriate - for example they might say: report only on the overall score if there is not a statistically significant gap between VIQ/PIQ etc.  I can't imagine that a professional association would not allow full explanation of IQ results which would include information about areas of strength and weakness (whether statistically significant or not).  Basically, I'm trying to say that statistical significance is relevant to what scores are calculated but not to whether they are reported to parents.  I hope that makes sense.  I should put in a huge disclaimer that I am not and never have been a psychologist or school councellor and have never administered or scored such a test.  So, this information is just parents understanding of how things work so there is a definite possibility of me understanding it incorrectly.


#195 bluemonkey

Posted 17 May 2012 - 09:25 PM

Katrina24 - I admit to being rather crosseyed as I digest your reply, but I appreciate you taking the time to explain.
Can I just ask you to clarify your first sentence though blush.gif Did you mean that you are surprised at the resistance of the counsellor to providing additional information or at my unhappiness at their refusal? I'm not being narky, just wasn't sure what you meant ninja.gif
QUOTE
Some tests will also give information about statistically significant differences between subtest scores - for example if a child scores subtest scores of 8, 9, 10 - skills are fairly consistent across the areas but if a child scores 5, 5, 12 you could assume that the overall score is not representative of the child's abilities because they have poor skills with a splinter skill in one area - the overall score would be like an average of these scores and would not accurately represent the child's abilities.
This is one thing I'm quite interested in as there was such a large difference between the highest and lowest percentiles provided. I have no issue with the actual results at all (not saying that the counsellor didn't do the assessment appropriately etc), I am just curious as to why DD had such a low %ile and indeed, don't care if its statistically significant, but more if its highlighting an area of concern etc. I totally agree that one can not expect a FSIQ that is representational of the child's abilities if there is inconsistency with the subtest scores etc (at least, I think that's what you meant above).

Ok, stepping away before I get dizzy laughing2.gif Hope I made sense. Not good to reread one's words too many times...



#196 katrina24

Posted 17 May 2012 - 11:35 PM

Hi there, sorry about the incoherence of my last post, I was rushing and had two little girls hanging off of me pestering me.

I definitely meant I was surprised at their reluctance to give you more info.  I totally understand why you want more info, it would drive me nuts not be be given all the info.

The reason it is so important to look further into scores that are heaps higher or lower than others is because they can skew results. So, say little Sally is doing the test, she's having a great day and feeling confident.  All of her scores are in the range of 12-14 but then she really needs to pee and all she can thinking of is not wetting herself. So, her last subtext score is 4. This may look like a real area of weakness.  If it is combined with the other test scores (say 12 and 13) it may bring her overall score below 100 which would not be an accurate reflection of ability.  That's why there are guidelines about when not to calculate scores on some tests when the gap between subtext scores is too great.

I am totally inventing these numbers. Like I said before, I'm not a psyc so could be a bit off track but this is how it has been explained to me.  

With the overall scores, if there are two scores that combine to calculate the overall iq result, the overall score can sometimes not be calculated if the gap is above a certain number.  For example, a child with a verbal iq of 80 and a non-verbal iq of 130.  If an overall iq score was calculated this child would seem to have an average iq. But, in reality they are likely gifted with a weakness in language, possibly even some language difficulties.  Each individual test would have it's own rules about all of this.  I'm just basing it on the one person who explained one test to me so it may not be relevant to your situation.

I absolutely think it is worth following up. In my opinion, the value of an iq test is in the anaylsis of the results, not just the overall score.  If ther are some outliers (scores well above or below the trend) then I would ask questions to try and figure out why.  If the score in a particular area is really bad then I might follow up with investigations in this area.  

I hope that is a bit clearer.

#197 bluemonkey

Posted 18 May 2012 - 07:03 AM

QUOTE (katrina24 @ 17/05/2012, 11:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I definitely meant I was surprised at their reluctance to give you more info.  I totally understand why you want more info, it would drive me nuts not be be given all the info.
...
I absolutely think it is worth following up. In my opinion, the value of an iq test is in the anaylsis of the results, not just the overall score.  If ther are some outliers (scores well above or below the trend) then I would ask questions to try and figure out why.  If the score in a particular area is really bad then I might follow up with investigations in this area.


Hi Katrina,
Ahhh, thanks for clarifying. And yes, its not all about the number for me, its actually about DDs brain and her learning. Thats why I just wasn't expecting the refusal for more information. sad.gif  I can't see how my understanding her results better would be a detriment to her shrug.gif Its amazing how you can feel so dismissed and disregarded in a situation like this.

#198 Swelle

Posted 18 May 2012 - 07:26 AM

When results have big differences between percentiles say between verbal and visual it can actually indicate learning issues so they might have some funny numbers they dont want to pass on without giving you context or getting further info.  For example my son scores in the 99th percentile for visual skills.  On a neurodevelopmental assessment and an intelligence test he hit the ceiling on a number of subset - his visual skills are incredible according to his psych. However his expressive verbal skills were in the 34th percentile so a full scale iq is unable to be reported.  He has a big verbal lag which we are working hard to try to address.

#199 Michaelmichelle

Posted 18 May 2012 - 12:25 PM

There is a discrepancy between the scores from our school assessment I think it warrant a private testing rather than having sleepless nights.

We finally get to it and never once look back.

#200 lishermide

Posted 18 May 2012 - 08:42 PM

Meagum, my son was similar. 98th for PIQ, 50th for VIQ and in the 30's for Processing speed. He has Aspergers, and his speech is slow and awkward. Thankfully for us he performs academically in line with his PIQ original.gif




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