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Gifted & Talented Primary Years #24


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#151 mamaknits

Posted 17 March 2012 - 08:00 PM

Not laughing.. it is far far too early to tell, in my opinion. Give it a few years. In the mean time just enjoy your baby original.gif

#152 katrina24

Posted 20 March 2012 - 07:42 PM

Hi, my DD is experiencing a few little issues during lunch times I thought I'd ask about to see if anyone else has experienced the same and has tips to share. DD has not been tested but is performing well above age for all subject areas (grade 1) and has been identified by the school as 'flying well above her cohort'. She is in a 1/2 composite and during class interacts with the older kids. She is grouped with the year 2 extension kids for her literacy and I think she does some numeracy with them and then some where she sits with her peers but does alternative work. During break times she is saying she feels left out.  She doesn't enjoy the games the other year 1 kids are interested in and finds some of their social strategies frustrating. But, the year 2 girls don't want a year 1 hanging around them at playtime.  I've let her teacher know but I'm at a bit of a loss as to what to advise her. She seems in no mans land ... She has interests quite different to her peers but isn't accepted by the older kids (although during class her teacher reports this is who she spends time interacting with).  She isn't lacking social skills, but she does not respond well to being 'bossed' around and won't play games she thinks are silly or boring.  I'm working on compromising with her.  Her teacher agrees with me about where her problems lie and is planning on trying to address it.  The school have done a wonderful job of extending her so we had decided not to test but I think we are changing our mind and heading more towards getting some private testing done.  Any similar experiences or tips?

#153 katrina24

Posted 20 March 2012 - 07:47 PM

Hi nat1976, I agree that it's too early to think about giftedness.  It's great that your bub is doing so well and that you are so proud.  I think a lot of those early milestones are a reflection of personality (just my opinion) so I think you may have a happy, sociable and adventurous bub on your hands. I hope she continues to bring you such enjoyment, it's lovely to read about and certainly nothing to laugh about. I'm sure it's something that crosses the mind of many new parents and your never know, it may turn out that she really is a clever little button.

#154 Michaelmichelle

Posted 21 March 2012 - 02:20 PM

Can a gifted child not soar at achievement test but is still considered gifted by iq test?
Does it mean the child is underachieving?

#155 kh79

Posted 21 March 2012 - 03:57 PM

Hi there everyone,

I have crashed this board a few times but not for quite a while.

I have a question and I think this is probably the best place to put it but if I am wrong and if it's better in the diasbilities section, please let me know.

DS is3 years old.  He was diagnosed with PDD-NOS 6 months ago. He is very mild, he is likely to end up with an aspergers dx when he is reassessed maybe next year.

Since he wax very little (less than a year old) he has had some extreme gifts mainly associated with memory.  At the time we didn't question ASD but thought he was gifted.

As he grows a little older we still think he is gifted.  Like many ASD kids he has splinter skills but in his case it seems to be more than that.  He has an understanding of quite complex concepts.  If you give him a word he can give you a word that goes with it and explain why for example 'i say snow' he says 'winter, because it only snows in winter'.  I am yet to find a word that he can't play this game with.

He is amazing at geography and has been since 13 months old.  He is incredible at maths nowadays.  He is doing calculations in his head.  Reasonably simple adding and subtracting but a couple of multiplication ones.  He has started to teach himself how to read by sounding out words. He does 300 piece jigsaws. He is interested in physics and constantly asked questions about gas, liquids and solids etc.

He has a few special interests that he likes to collect facts about as well.

So as you can see it isn't a case of a couple of useless splinter skills that can't be applied to life.

We have not had him tested and don't know yet if he is gifted.

There are clearly areas of delay too.  Physically he is very behind.  Also socially he is sitting just on par with his peers but needs lots of work.

My question after rambling so much is that he has started preschool recently (an excellent school) and they are teaching them the alphabet etc, everything you would expect of a preschool.  He loves going there and does not have any behavioral issues, so we are very happy

But do you think I should be getting some extension for him? I worry because although his language is advanced he would not be able to tell mr if he was bored or needed something else.

I worry that i might be doing him a disservice by not fostering his talents.

We are doing therapy and purely focus on his areas of delay at home.  I am administering all of his therapy so I do not have the capacity to extend him outside of preschool.

What do you think? I am inclined to let i be but i don't want to be making a massive mistake.  I'm quite clueless in regards to this stuff to be honest.

Many thanks

#156 baddmammajamma

Posted 21 March 2012 - 04:51 PM

My dear kh79:

I know that you know our story very well & that our kids are, in many ways, kindred spirits.

First things first, I would speak to his teachers. They are probably already getting a sense of his exceptional cognitive abilities. See what ideas they have for extension.

If you love the preschool, and he is making some gains socially, that should be your very top priority IMHO. I don't mean to blow off the gifted catering, because it's important too, but nothing can replace those core foundation "tool kit skills" that an environment like a good preschool can provide.

HOWEVER, that doesn't mean you should abandon the extension idea all together! Not at all. You just need to get a "read" from the preschool on just how receptive they are. Ours, for instance, was all over it...but they lacked resources to put something into place.

What we ended up doing in preschool for J was hiring a uni student to come in twice/week during "rest time" and do really creative extension stuff at preschool during that "zone out time" - she loved it! I just felt that it was a very big "ask" to have the teacher come up with all sorts of very tailored activities for J. Of course, we did it all under the guise of her funky twice exceptional profile, so the school was very amenable. We carried it out in a way that was discreet (lest other kids feel that they were missing out).

When you speak to his teachers, see if they would be happy for you to pack a special box of challenging brain twister puzzles, math worksheets, etc. etc -- so that he can work on these when he has some extra time. Or, see if you can get a preview of what they will be working on in class during a particular week. If it's the letter A, then you perhaps you can suggest a few ways to extend him sideways.

You might also want to join a few online communities (happy to send you links to a few good ones that are private so that you can share more openly) for ideas and support. You know where to find me. wink.gif

Lastly, plan to have him tested sometime next year (as he approaches 5). Gifted Minds is probably the way to go -- there are some testers who do great work in the 2e space, but I think GMs does an exceptional job at doing the deeper dives with gifted kids (esp. those who are at the upper end of the IQ scale, as I bet yours is!)

Edited by baddmammajamma, 21 March 2012 - 09:49 PM.


#157 kh79

Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:29 PM

Thank you K, you are always a pilar of knowledge and help!

Some excellent ideas . I especially love extending at home based on the topic at school.

The preschool is attached to a private school in with he will attend.  The teachers are proper teacher and we have been assured by A at lizard that they are 'exceptional' (second to none that she has ever seen).

We do want to come across as pushy and really our focus is to work on the delays while we can.  I just have moments of doubt.  I am unsure of his depth of knowledge and at times he seems like just another toddler and at other times his gifts seem so extreme its scary, if that makes sense.

Do you think gifted minds are equipped to test ASD kids as well? I know you had j tested by Lizard, how did the results compare? In terms of details reports etc and overall performance.  Obviously I am not asking you to reveal personal details about j...just general.

I will pm you about the groups...many thanks:)



#158 lunargirl

Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:57 PM

Hi everyone original.gif

I have a question about my (untested) DD1 who is in Grade 1 (Vic).

I would like to extend her English abilities at home, but am not sure how to go about it. I don't mean reading "harder" books, but more teaching her about idioms, analogies, poetry, more creative ways to express herself in her writing - that sort of thing. Her reading and writing are extremely good but I know she would love to be extended in these ways, and I'm not sure her classroom is providing these sorts of opportunities. DH and I are both fairly intelligent (or so we like to tell ourselves  cool.gif )  so although I'm quite happy to do it at home, neither of us are teachers and I don't quite know where to begin.

#159 Sue Heck

Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:02 PM

O

Edited by Helen Magnus, 03 May 2012 - 12:49 AM.


#160 baddmammajamma

Posted 21 March 2012 - 09:49 PM

kh79: Will PM you.

#161 inthearmsofsleep

Posted 22 March 2012 - 12:31 AM

Hi all,

I haven't popped in for a while but have been reading the posts from time to time. I still don't feel like I have much to contribute but I love reading about other people's experiences. I will try to be a bit more pro-active and contribute where I can!!

Life here has been a whirlwind, as usual. I'm studying this year, a grad cert in my specialty and currently procrastinating over an assignment due next week!! Got the intro written and ideas but lacking the drive to get it done.

DD3 has her GM testing on Friday morning... finally!!! She is now in year 1 and loves the formal learning environment. She is in AE for maths and literacy as well as being extended in all subject areas. She is in her own spelling group (which I felt sad about but she loves) and is being given extra guided reading homework with comprehension activities etc so she is reading for meaning and learning about different writing styles, underlying meanings, plots etc. They are lovely books, from the "sails" series. Much better than the tired old PM readers I have heard from all three kids. She is in level 14 for the PM readers and the teacher is holding her and another child there to ensure they are reading for meaning, even though they read the words easily. Her comprehension is pretty good so we will see how she goes with the extra activities.

I just realised I haven't posted since before we got reports last year!! DD3's was very cute (in PP), saying she loved to read to the class and had them engaged to the point that the teacher could go and do a few things in the class. Nothing really formal about the reports at that age.

Is anyone else's school pushing their kids towards NAPLAN? DD2 seems to be struggling in a big way with the concepts. It seems that they should have introduced these concepts last year in year 2 rather than trying to cram them full of information in year 3. DD1 in year 5 is also doing a lot of persuasive writing but she scored very well on her year 3 NAPLAN so I am not so worried about her. I know it is just one test, a snapshot of what the child knows on that one day but I am worried about the emphasis they put on it and how the kids get coached.

For those who have done the GM testing questionnaire, is there anything I should definitely include? I know that sounds weird, I just don't want to miss anything! I'm a bit stuck on the question about "school performance, awards, reports" because DD3 is only just beginning formal schooling and her PP report is more fluffy. The only thing I can draw on is the general comments from her teacher! All the assessment bits are things like "I can count 1-20" and "I can hold my pencil in the correct way" and a scale of "always" "usually" etc. Also finding it difficult to answer the "favourite activities at school" qu. I have asked her teacher but not had anything back yet so will go with DD3's response which was practically everything!!

Something I keep meaning to mention... DD3 is STILL wearing pull ups to bed at night and they are usually soaked in the morning. Occasionally we have a dry night and had a few dry weeks over the holidays. She was TT during the day by 2 years but has always been soaked at night. DD1 was very similar, needing the enuresis mat to help her sort things out. DD2 decided just before year 1 she would be dry and has been since. A strange thing, but I wonder if it has to do with the way they think or being so mentally busy through the day? DD1 and 3 are similar in personality, intelligence etc where DD2 is quite different, more kinesthetic and more down to earth. Has anyone else had similar issues? Clutching at straws here!!

Better head off to bed so I can start to finish this assignment tomorrow!! The night shift for the next 3 nights... will be turning up to our assessment after no sleep so hope they don't ask me too many intelligent questions!

Will try and catch up a bit when I procrastinate tomorrow  wink.gif



#162 baddmammajamma

Posted 22 March 2012 - 06:31 AM

Only have a sec to post, but good luck to your daughter!

I went light on including school stuff & tended to focus on the types of things my daughter was doing (as opposed to "Earned an award at assembly for good classroom behavior.")

Also, be sure to ask Fiona or Minh (don't know who's doing your testing) for a ballpark estimate of your daughter's performance after she finishes the test. They are usually very happy to comply. When my daughter tested, Minh said, "Whoa. She did REALLY well." And I had no idea what that meant & I didn't think to ask! So I had to wait for the full report. My wiser friends went ahead and asked and were given much better ballpark figures!

Have fun -- GM is a great practice! original.gif

#163 katrina24

Posted 22 March 2012 - 06:44 AM

Hi, I've not heard of a link between TT at night and giftedness.  I think it is a more physiological thing - there is quite a bit of research into bed wetting that you may find interesting (I'm sure some will pop up with a quick google).  A close friend of mine has a little girl in grade 1 who has just become night trained (she was also trained in the day at 2).  She is a bright, active and happy little girl but not gifted/highly able.

#164 kyrrie

Posted 24 March 2012 - 12:26 AM

QUOTE (katrina24 @ 20/03/2012, 07:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi, my DD is experiencing a few little issues during lunch times I thought I'd ask about to see if anyone else has experienced the same and has tips to share. DD has not been tested but is performing well above age for all subject areas (grade 1) and has been identified by the school as 'flying well above her cohort'. She is in a 1/2 composite and during class interacts with the older kids. She is grouped with the year 2 extension kids for her literacy and I think she does some numeracy with them and then some where she sits with her peers but does alternative work. During break times she is saying she feels left out.  She doesn't enjoy the games the other year 1 kids are interested in and finds some of their social strategies frustrating. But, the year 2 girls don't want a year 1 hanging around them at playtime.  I've let her teacher know but I'm at a bit of a loss as to what to advise her. She seems in no mans land ... She has interests quite different to her peers but isn't accepted by the older kids (although during class her teacher reports this is who she spends time interacting with).  She isn't lacking social skills, but she does not respond well to being 'bossed' around and won't play games she thinks are silly or boring.  I'm working on compromising with her.  Her teacher agrees with me about where her problems lie and is planning on trying to address it.  The school have done a wonderful job of extending her so we had decided not to test but I think we are changing our mind and heading more towards getting some private testing done.  Any similar experiences or tips?


Hi Katrina, my DS experiences some of this, although he is probably not a giftie, just very bright so he has a good cohort to work with. But socially he struggles because he prefers playing with older kids and hates noise. He loves silliness but only on his terms. He bemoans the lack of conversation in the playground (strange kid) and his teacher and I are trying to encourage interaction with kids who are likely to become good companions in the future. He is lucky because the yr 2 kids in his class play with him a lot.

My child who is most likely the gifted one is different. She's a social chameleon and changes depending on who she is playing with. She has to wait until high school I think before she finds friends she can be herself with.

QUOTE (lunargirl @ 21/03/2012, 05:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi everyone original.gif

I have a question about my (untested) DD1 who is in Grade 1 (Vic).

I would like to extend her English abilities at home, but am not sure how to go about it. I don't mean reading "harder" books, but more teaching her about idioms, analogies, poetry, more creative ways to express herself in her writing - that sort of thing. Her reading and writing are extremely good but I know she would love to be extended in these ways, and I'm not sure her classroom is providing these sorts of opportunities. DH and I are both fairly intelligent (or so we like to tell ourselves  cool.gif )  so although I'm quite happy to do it at home, neither of us are teachers and I don't quite know where to begin.

Lunargirl, 2 fantastic books are The Word Spy and Return of the Word Spy. They cover history of English and a whole heap of interesting facts about grammar and punctuation and include puzzles to solve in each chapter. Dd adored them when she was your daughter's age. We also borrowed books from the library about writing prose and poetry that were fabulous. We're away atm so I will look them up when we are home in a few weeks.

#165 mesaana

Posted 25 March 2012 - 04:03 PM


.

Edited by mesaana, 10 May 2012 - 11:47 AM.


#166 abcangel123

Posted 25 March 2012 - 08:40 PM

Hi Mesaana
I think I'd be trying to get that meeting asap, especially if things are going downhill. If it still doesn't work i'd be looking elsewhere as well.

Curtin is a good public school for bright kids. I've heard that they monitor the kids progress regularly and adjust the individual program regardless of whether they are in the extension class or not. Have heard they are pretty open to acceleration- which i have found pretty rare for ACT. I know it might sound pretty standard, but not all schools actually put it in motion.

Being out of area- if it's a magnet school they usually have priority for ppl who have been identified. We were also out of area for our school and the school was full to the brim, but we were able to get DD1 and DD2 in for kindy.

#167 katrina24

Posted 26 March 2012 - 07:03 PM

Thanks kyrrie. DD has found a little girl with similar interests to her - they are spending time together at breaks doing little creative things and planning activities etc. This suits DD much better than the 'race and chase' style of play that a lot of the others seem to be doing.

#168 =nourish=

Posted 26 March 2012 - 08:55 PM

Hi  

    I've been lurking and reading for a while  now, the information you all share on here is fantastic.

Edited by =nourish=, 28 March 2012 - 09:03 PM.


#169 lunargirl

Posted 27 March 2012 - 05:55 PM

Thanks kyrrie, they sound great. Thanks for the suggestion!

#170 kyrrie

Posted 28 March 2012 - 10:28 AM

The Word Spy books are fantastic. Dd read the first one 2 years ago and only yesterday was telling us about something she'd read in it about a word origin.

We are all loving not being at school and I'm sure the kids are learning much more than they do in a day at school. I would love to do this full time but not sure I have the stamina (or money).

#171 inthearmsofsleep

Posted 10 April 2012 - 06:48 PM

Hi all

Hope you all had a happy Easter and are enjoying the school holidays! I like not having to rush around to school, dancing, netball etc and letting the kids run a bit wild at home. Glad to be going to work tomorrow, the "Mary Poppins Chorus" is beginning to get a bit old... and this is just from the movie and soundtrack, we don't see the musical until next month!!

DD3 had her GM testing done about 2.5 weeks ago. Fiona did her testing and was really wonderful original.gif It was very laid back and casual, DD loved it! I could listen in from outside the room, was interesting to hear the types of questions and DD's responses. Fiona was really gentle and encouraging. So now I am stalking my inbox for the results!! I was told it should take a couple of weeks as Fiona was going to compile a stack of tests she has done recently but I know it takes around a month normally so I am not too concerned (just a bit excited to see the results!!). She did give me an indication of scores (thanks for reminding me to ask BMJ!) and told me DD's strength was in fluid reasoning. And she assured me I have a bright girl who did extremely well so I don't feel so much like the school is overestimating her abilities! The results will tell though wink.gif

Better keep going... kids driving me crazy with the noise and I am trying to get my portfolio for work together for tomorrow. So far I have found my portfolio guide book in a packing box and avoided anything else all day! Oops. Who would study with kids?!





#172 inthearmsofsleep

Posted 12 April 2012 - 12:27 PM

Just updating to say we got our results yesterday morning! I read the email on my phone, standing in line for coffee and felt sick! All was wonderful though original.gif DD did extremely well, and is certainly gifted. Fluid reasoning was her strength (as I was told at the time of testing) and she was very close to that ceiling. Still digesting the report and thinking about what sort of questions to ask! I've already read it twice and need to go through it again to wrap my head around it further. She also scored very high in visual-spatial processing, which was not at all a surprise.
Reading the descriptions of the tests, I can pretty well guess how DD1 would score if tested. She is quite similar to DD3 so I have been able to relate some of the information to her too.

The only thing I can really think to ask at this stage is when to give the information to the school? Who do I give it to (AE teacher, class teacher, head of ELC, learning support teacher?!)? Do I give them the whole report? Do I just email it to them or request a meeting to discuss it when I hand it over? Any of your experiences would be appreciated!! The report is 24 pages long and includes quite a bit about how teachers can help so I guess it would be best to give a copy of the whole report.

I wish I had this for DD1 last year when she was going though issues with her teacher... I would have liked to give her something like this to help advocate for DD1! Luckily she listened to me when I told her it was likely DD1 was bored and not engaged with the content, doesn't learn well by rote, is a visual learner etc, all this is in DD3's report!! Luckily DD1 has a very good teacher this year who is very much like her. I spoke to him a couple of weeks ago and he reiterated that she is a very bright kid and always has her head in a book, sometimes difficult to engage but it is not a problem, it is just her!! So this year she is being accepted and praised for the behaviours that got her into trouble last year... GO FIGURE!!

Any suggestions on how to deliver the report will be gratefully accepted original.gif I tend to over think things a tad, which I am doing now!!

Gifted or not, DD3 and DD1 are having an argument about who eats their boogers...! Kids! Happy school holidays Tounge1.gif

#173 *LucyE*

Posted 12 April 2012 - 04:18 PM

Hi!

Hope it's okay to join in here.  My head is spinning a bit and thought just getting it 'out there' will help original.gif

5 yr old DD has just been confirmed as being gifted.  We had her tested after some problems communicating with her teacher (she's in FYOS) and I was after some concrete evidence to back me up.

8 yr old DS is also gifted and was tested 2 years ago.  He also has a few other issues (such as auditory processing issues) and a great teacher last year so it wasn't overly challenging for me.

I'm feeling a little isolated with the whole 'blessed with a gifted child thing'.  

Firstly, I've got an appointment to meet with the head of the junior school, to discuss DD's progress at school.  Not sure what I want them to do but I don't want things to continue as they have been.  I am watching my very enthusiastic, eager to learn child becoming disinterested in school.  I really don't want her enthusiasm to be quashed at such a young age.  

BJM would you mind PMing me with those links to other forums?

#174 Michaelmichelle

Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:07 PM

Another person who wishes to know if anyone submit the entire report to Gifted minds to school?

* I am so relieved that our child has been tested* Another happy recipent of GM
Thanks to all the ladies here who has PM me previously



#175 Michaelmichelle

Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:20 PM

Oh to add on. The school testing indeed left us lost and even more confused. Finally understood why it was SO NOT RECOMMENDED here!




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Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.