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can somebody help me decide on a possible birth plan?
im looking for advise


40 replies to this topic

#1 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 04:49 PM

well im kinda not sure of whats going on and i was hoping for a few stories or hints or tips and advise on things i should maybe choose or think about about.
im pregnant with twins, 31 weeks. and apparently i need to or should start thinking about things to do and im so confused atm.


i think i want to try and have a vaginal birth cause i dont heal well at all and i hate pains that slow me down from doing things i have to do so i kinda dont wanna get cut open.

and i dont want a spinal or epidural. cause i hate needles and they distress me and last time i had one i went into shock. (twin a didnt like it either and moved weird which puts me more on edge)

and so the only thing is gas, but i keep hearing that it doesnt work well and a midwife told me i can affect the bubs.

and i wanted to know if anyone had any ideas.


someone asked me if i could have the perfect labor what would i choose for pain relief and i said a bullet... she didnt like it very much XD

but one of the things that kinda gets to me is i might not have any control over what happends.

this whole things is kinda stressing me abit.

#2 pixiesticks

Posted 21 October 2011 - 04:59 PM

I used just gas with all 3 of my labours. It worked fantastic!! As far as I'm aware it gas no affect on the baby at all. It doesn't enter your bloodstream and wears off pretty much as soon as you stop breathing it in. I'd have a go with it. Gas seems to work with some people but not others. Maybe request the gas first but if your not coping ask for pethadine or something else.

Good luck with the arrival of your twins!!

ETA that 2 of my kids were induced at 36 and 38 weeks. Also 2 of them were posterior. Although I haven't had twins I did find the gas got me through. Also that if your being monitored you can use it to your advantage. The number on the machine will start to rise before a contraction gets painful, this is when you start sucking on the gas. Long deep breathes!! And once the number starts falling stop sucking. If your not being monitored just start sucking as soon as you feel a contraction starting or if you know one is due to begin.

Edited by pixiesticks, 21 October 2011 - 05:07 PM.


#3 Honeymummy

Posted 21 October 2011 - 04:59 PM

Hi,
I used gas with my three pregnancies. It took until the third and an awesome midwife who helped me use it correctly. Basically you need to start breathing it in a few seconds before the contraction starts and stop just before it finishes. So you need to be timing them or have a rough idea when they are going to start.

It is tricky to use - but very very effective if you manage to do it. I must say though - it only gives limited pain coverage. I had very painful inductions and the pain was still unbearable towards transition with just gas.

If you think you may need a bullet - then I would be thinking you should at least entertain the thought of an epi or spinal. You dont want to go in uninformed - you will probably be suprised what you end up asking for when it actually starts.

Read up on your choices. Dont stress too much about a plan. I took one to my first - and they laughed and said they dont read them. I have had this in both public and private hospitals.

Goodluck!

#4 Jenferal

Posted 21 October 2011 - 04:59 PM

Best advice, talk your concerns over with your midwife or OB or whoever you're seeing during the pregnancy.
I never had a birth plan because as far as I'm concerned, birth doesn't GO to plan.
I was open to whatever suggestions were made on the day, in the moment. You might find gas works for you(and it DOESN'T affect the baby as it's out of your system really fast) and you might like to move around, or not.
I think the placement of your twins will affect your choices a bit as well.
I'm sure other women can tell you more though, I've not had twins (though I am one, and Mum delivered us vaginally back in the day).
Good luck and try not to stress too much.

#5 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 05:04 PM

as soon as they talk about needles at my antenatal appointments i get annoyed and freaked up and upset (maybe cause they wont drop it) i know i'll need some but still i dont want to be full of holes.

i dont have an OB i keep getting different ones everytime i go in. most of the time they dont read my file and only glance over it and nag me about needles :/

yea  i know but id still like to have a general idea of what i want just incase because i have no idea whats happening as it is.


#6 heatherbell89

Posted 21 October 2011 - 05:08 PM

I can only speak from my experience, and what I plan for my twin  birth.

I have two children, both have been vaginal deliveries, bth were induced due to me having PreE, both were very quick.

First labour, was just under three hours, I had gel, waters were broken and drip started, but turned off after 20 min as I went straight into active labour after breaking waters. I used gas and air, and presumed it was turned right up, never felt a need for anything else. Was only a few months later I was retelling my labour story when DH corrected me and said G+A was at level 1 - so 90% air.

Second labour I had gel, was examined and not quite 2cm, 45 min i delivered him.Again I used G+A on level 1.

I am scared of epidurals, I will have one if medically necessary but otherwise no way! Same goes for c-sect. For me G+A worked perfectly, it takes the focus off the pain but doesnt remove the pain, but for me it was enough to cope with the contractions. With  my son, I actually stopped using it through one contraction because I thought the pain of the contractions had stopped, but nope it was just that I go into la la land and am able to cope with it when using hte G+A.  

Everyone has different experiences, my sister hated the g+a, said it made her feel sick, I have dfriends that started on it then went to an epi. Ive had friends that used nothing at all. Im not 100% if it does effect the babies, to be honest I dont remember being told that, but even if it does, it would be momentary as it is literally out of your system within about three breaths of fresh air. I do know that pethedine effects babies as its administered through blood stream, I believe that epis do not effect babies. However all of that is my laymans knowledge not medical professional (although it was passed on via midwives etc)

With the twins, I have put that I want vaginal births, without epidural unless medically neccessary, that I will not have a c-sect unless the babies or I am at risk, and that Dh will cut twin A's cord (preferably after it stops pulsating depending on length of cord) pass him / her to me for as long as I can hold them until Twin B is born where I will pass twin A to DH and I will cut the cord (again preferably after it stops pulsating), then have a cuddle. I have also put that I want skin to skin contact ASAP. Thats the extent of the plan original.gif

Maybe post this in the twin section to they will be able to give mor einsight into how their twin births went, good luck with the rest of your pregnancy, we don't have long to go - Im two weeks in front of you original.gif



#7 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 05:14 PM

yea i agree with u. the epi sounds scary and so does c-sec... i dont wanna be awake :,<
XD

i dont even wanna think about if they have to induce me :<
i think gas would be best for me. i remember when i was young  i needed to have the gas to calm me so they could put a needle in my arm to knock me out XD

good luck with urs. hopefully its all good and we both get what we want original.gif

#8 busymumof1&1/2

Posted 21 October 2011 - 05:14 PM

hi battymeep, I suggest you look up all different sorts of pain relief and put them in order of preference. We learnt all about different reliefs in our pre natal classes. For DD my DH was adamant that we would not be having an epidural, he was really against it, so I was open to the gas and pethadine, which I used with success, this was my only pain relief for DD. For this labour I am hoping to hire a tens machine. I am willing to try it at home before I go to the hospital, and for as long as it is working, before asking for the gas, then the pethadine, if needed, and in worst case scenario, I am willing to entertain an epidural (I am still hoping this will not be neccessary.)
My DH was fully aware of my pain relief wishes, and this helped to facilitate with the MW's and doctors on the day.
Go in with an open mind but be prepared.
BTW my sister had twins naturally and was in active labour for 1 hour Total. 30 minutes for my nephew and 25 minutes for my niece, and she only had time for the gas, nothing else.
Good Luck


#9 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 05:21 PM

idk about pethidine.

i never got signed in for pre-natal classes and ive looked up some reliefs but i cant seem to find much on them. i even looked in the book they gave me at the antenatal clinic and it doesnt mention much.

im trying to but its kinda stressing me out. but my partner is trying to calm me but it doesnt work when i ask his opinion and he just shrugs


#10 PurpleNess

Posted 21 October 2011 - 05:33 PM

Perhaps look at having a doula present to be your advocate or even look into hypno or calm birthing.
Explore massage, heat packs, tens machine, active birthing ( changing positions) using showers & baths as pain relief.

You can also request that the hopital staff do not offer you an Epi. It's NOT an option for me under any circumstances, I'd rather give birth than have someone stick a needle in my spine!

Look into possible side affects of things like pethadine etc & get informed, so many choices out there & you need to decide what your comfortable with . You DH should also understand your decisisons & support you, that'll be his job on the day.

Good Luck

#11 heatherbell89

Posted 21 October 2011 - 05:45 PM

Just googled this for you http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/b...ef_options?open

Maybe your partner is thinking that it will b eyou in pain so you should make the decisions? I would have slapped my DH if he had "banned" me from using a specific form of pain relief!

#12 Fossy

Posted 21 October 2011 - 05:56 PM

YOU are your best advocate.  Research, read books, speak to friends, family, midwives etc. Write down all your questions, ask, ask, ask!  Find out the hospital policy re twins.  Make sure you know what they will expect, and be prepared to speak up for what you want.

In the end it's up to you to voice what you want, not your partner, not the midwives.  Knowledge is power, remember that!

Good luck!

#13 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 05:58 PM

QUOTE (PurpleNess @ 21/10/2011, 06:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Perhaps look at having a doula present to be your advocate or even look into hypno or calm birthing.
Explore massage, heat packs, tens machine, active birthing ( changing positions) using showers & baths as pain relief.

You can also request that the hopital staff do not offer you an Epi. It's NOT an option for me under any circumstances, I'd rather give birth than have someone stick a needle in my spine!

Look into possible side affects of things like pethadine etc & get informed, so many choices out there & you need to decide what your comfortable with . You DH should also understand your decisisons & support you, that'll be his job on the day.

Good Luck



i cant afford a doula
i dont know what other postions there are. i dont like people touching me and i dont know if my hospital does calm birthing (not that i know what it is) or hypno birthing. i was hoping for showers if they let me XD i like having a hot shower when im in pain it works most of the time.


my mum got an epi. i dont know how when she hates needles 2 (although shes not scared of them like i am)


i dont know where i can get the info. ive looked in books and online. :/


he does support me he just feels kinda helpless.

#14 ecb

Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:00 PM

You are obviously in a public hospital.  I get your concern as I felt much like that too when I fronted up for my fortnightly appointment, saw a different OB each time, and (s)he checked my scan results and my BP and hten sent me on my way without discussing any finer details such as, say, childbirth.  

Firstly, I think you need to be very concious of the fact that you are having a twin birth and therefore it is not the same as a singleton birth in regards to risk and treatment.  The risk of intervention for the second twin during a vaginal delivery is high.  This could mean either that the baby has to be turned or that you could need an emergency c-section. For this reason, you will find most OBs will strongly recommend you at least have an epi in place even if you don't have it turned on.  Also, it means that you will likely be under constant monitoring for both heartbeats.  This, unfortuantely, means being strapped to a bed with the monitors on your belly.  For me, I almost literally could not move at all because when I did that we lost Twin A's heartbeat.  If you are strapped to a bed covered in monitors (if you are induced they'll want one on your contractions too so a total of 3) then you have no real option of taking up any of the more natural forms of pain relief (warm water/birth, massage, ball, pacing the room, different position etc) so you may well be more than happy for an epi because, let me tell you, it's bl**dy awful being in labour and stuck in the one position on your back with monitors all over you.  

My first childbirth experience was being induced at 6 mths after having learned my baby had died.  I had never been in favour of an epi but with everything I was going through at the time I was very scared already and so opted to have one because I wasn't sure I could do it on my own.  It was a disaster.  She hit my bone the first time she tried adn then the damn thing didn't work.  Well, it worked enough to plummet my blood pressure but not enough to actually provide pain relief.  And I was left with such an aching back at the site of the epi.  It was really horrible and, in unison with the general negative experience of giving birth to a dead baby, I just never ever ever ever EVER wanted to have another one.  

Then I learned I was having twins.  The realisation that they'd want me to have an epi was more abhorrent and scary to me than the idea of birth 2 babies.  It was over 11 years between birth experiences for me so I'd carried this fear for a long time.  I mentioned it to one of the OBs I saw and he immediately booked me in for a consult with one of their anethsetists.  Both of them stated that I would not be forced into something that I didn't want but that I needed to be aware that if it wasn't in place then I would need to be prepared for the fact that if Twin 2 needed turning in utero in order to birth her there would be no pain relief and that if an emergency exit was required it would be under a general.  The anesthetist then spent quite some time with me discussing the ins and outs of an epidural and why it may have gone so badly the first time.  He examined me and assured me that he would have no trouble safely and properly inserting one.  

So, I was left to mull things over.  In the end I decided to go for having the epi in place and playing it by ear on the day as to whether or not I would have them turn it on (which i did in the end once I realised I was stuck to the bed with all the monitoring - when the contractions hit with full force my body went into a bit of shock adn I was shivering and shuddering between contractions.  The epi was definitely a relief.  And, can I say, the anesthetist (although not the same one I saw) was absolutely AMAZING.  It was all in my notes already, which he had read, but I re-briefed him on my previous experience.  He was just so soothing to talk to and it was seamless.  So far removed from my first botched attempt that was not made any more bearable by the abrupt manner of that horrid Dr).  My main decision making came down to two things.  The first was that everytime I came across a story of someone who had vaginally birthed twins without one and who had required manual turning of Twin 2 in utero the word they all used was "excrutiating".  Kinda made me nervous.  But the main reason was around the need for a GA if I ended up needing an emergency c/s.  I didn't want to be uncconcious when I delievered my babies.  I didn't want for my DH not to be able to be there.  I didn't want for my baby to be born unconcious (as they will briefly be if tou are under a GA) and freak my DH out.  I didn't want to be sick and groggy when I first met my babies.  I didn't want for my DH to be in a position where I was in recovery and the babies were elsewhere especially given the babies could potentially be in 2 different places if 1 required some kind of special care and the other didn't.  Basically, I summised that the possible stress to him if I didn't have an epi and required a c/s was greater than my stress in having an epi.  

So, I would encourage you to take your fears to whichever OB you see at your next appointment and discuss them.  Ask if it is possible to meet with one of the anesthetists to discuss an epi if you think it may help you.  Ask what their normal expectation is re epis, monitoring, pain relief etc during birth for twin births.  I would seriously consider asking for intermitten monitoring in the early stages.  This is about the only thing I would change for my birth.  It would've been nice to have been able to get up and about when not much was happening and save all that discomfort for when it was absolutely necessary.  



#15 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:02 PM

QUOTE (Bubs10 @ 21/10/2011, 06:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
YOU are your best advocate.  Research, read books, speak to friends, family, midwives etc. Write down all your questions, ask, ask, ask!  Find out the hospital policy re twins.  Make sure you know what they will expect, and be prepared to speak up for what you want.

In the end it's up to you to voice what you want, not your partner, not the midwives.  Knowledge is power, remember that!

Good luck!



apparently what happends depends on what doc i get on the day. i already tried asking and thats all they said ^
i dont know what to ask. and they usually dont help much. and so much could happen they dont know what to expect.

i dont know what i want :< and looking up everything just makes me upset and depressive about the whole thing and then ppl press me for answers and i get upset and start stressing etc

plus im very much a doormat. and if they try to pressure me into something i'll probs sook and cry and get upset because i dont know what to do

#16 HeroOfCanton

Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:04 PM

The things that worked best for me with the gas was that it made me stop 'panicking' & focus on my breathing. I'm not sure if all machines work the same, but in order for the mouthpiece to work, it had to make this rattle sound, and it was hearing that & making sure I could do it that helped me calm down & feel less pain than the gas itself.

I've also been told it doesn't get into your bloodstream and affect your baby (or in your case, babies)

#17 dustybookshelves

Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:11 PM

If you want an encouraging, empowering book to read, try 'birth skills' by Juju Sundin. It has techniques for coping with labour on your own, but it also respects anyone's decision to use pain relief should they feel that they want to.

#18 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:18 PM

You are obviously in a public hospital.  I get your concern as I felt much like that too when I fronted up for my fortnightly appointment, saw a different OB each time, and (s)he checked my scan results and my BP and hten sent me on my way without discussing any finer details such as, say, childbirth.  

Firstly, I think you need to be very concious of the fact that you are having a twin birth and therefore it is not the same as a singleton birth in regards to risk and treatment.  The risk of intervention for the second twin during a vaginal delivery is high.  This could mean either that the baby has to be turned or that you could need an emergency c-section. For this reason, you will find most OBs will strongly recommend you at least have an epi in place even if you don't have it turned on.  Also, it means that you will likely be under constant monitoring for both heartbeats.  This, unfortuantely, means being strapped to a bed with the monitors on your belly.  For me, I almost literally could not move at all because when I did that we lost Twin A's heartbeat.  If you are strapped to a bed covered in monitors (if you are induced they'll want one on your contractions too so a total of 3) then you have no real option of taking up any of the more natural forms of pain relief (warm water/birth, massage, ball, pacing the room, different position etc) so you may well be more than happy for an epi because, let me tell you, it's bl**dy awful being in labour and stuck in the one position on your back with monitors all over you.  

My first childbirth experience was being induced at 6 mths after having learned my baby had died.  I had never been in favour of an epi but with everything I was going through at the time I was very scared already and so opted to have one because I wasn't sure I could do it on my own.  It was a disaster.  She hit my bone the first time she tried adn then the damn thing didn't work.  Well, it worked enough to plummet my blood pressure but not enough to actually provide pain relief.  And I was left with such an aching back at the site of the epi.  It was really horrible and, in unison with the general negative experience of giving birth to a dead baby, I just never ever ever ever EVER wanted to have another one.  

Then I learned I was having twins.  The realisation that they'd want me to have an epi was more abhorrent and scary to me than the idea of birth 2 babies.  It was over 11 years between birth experiences for me so I'd carried this fear for a long time.  I mentioned it to one of the OBs I saw and he immediately booked me in for a consult with one of their anethsetists.  Both of them stated that I would not be forced into something that I didn't want but that I needed to be aware that if it wasn't in place then I would need to be prepared for the fact that if Twin 2 needed turning in utero in order to birth her there would be no pain relief and that if an emergency exit was required it would be under a general.  The anesthetist then spent quite some time with me discussing the ins and outs of an epidural and why it may have gone so badly the first time.  He examined me and assured me that he would have no trouble safely and properly inserting one.  

So, I was left to mull things over.  In the end I decided to go for having the epi in place and playing it by ear on the day as to whether or not I would have them turn it on (which i did in the end once I realised I was stuck to the bed with all the monitoring - when the contractions hit with full force my body went into a bit of shock adn I was shivering and shuddering between contractions.  The epi was definitely a relief.  And, can I say, the anesthetist (although not the same one I saw) was absolutely AMAZING.  It was all in my notes already, which he had read, but I re-briefed him on my previous experience.  He was just so soothing to talk to and it was seamless.  So far removed from my first botched attempt that was not made any more bearable by the abrupt manner of that horrid Dr).  My main decision making came down to two things.  The first was that everytime I came across a story of someone who had vaginally birthed twins without one and who had required manual turning of Twin 2 in utero the word they all used was "excrutiating".  Kinda made me nervous.  But the main reason was around the need for a GA if I ended up needing an emergency c/s.  I didn't want to be uncconcious when I delievered my babies.  I didn't want for my DH not to be able to be there.  I didn't want for my baby to be born unconcious (as they will briefly be if tou are under a GA) and freak my DH out.  I didn't want to be sick and groggy when I first met my babies.  I didn't want for my DH to be in a position where I was in recovery and the babies were elsewhere especially given the babies could potentially be in 2 different places if 1 required some kind of special care and the other didn't.  Basically, I summised that the possible stress to him if I didn't have an epi and required a c/s was greater than my stress in having an epi.  

So, I would encourage you to take your fears to whichever OB you see at your next appointment and discuss them.  Ask if it is possible to meet with one of the anesthetists to discuss an epi if you think it may help you.  Ask what their normal expectation is re epis, monitoring, pain relief etc during birth for twin births.  I would seriously consider asking for intermitten monitoring in the early stages.




what do u mean by intermitten monitoring?


they do that and continuelessly question y i havent done another GTTT

i know about the c/s if ones twins around the wrong way. but idk i dont wanna heal from 2 places. thats my worst fear.

id rather be out cause i dont want to feel them or be aware in anyway about being cut open... it would freak me out straight away if they did

and im going to stress right away with an epi or spinal.

and i know twin birth is very different. but i have no other birth to draw exp from.  


my friend gave birth at the hospital im going to have to goto and they didnt even believe she was in labor. and sshe had already had 1 bub.

#19 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:21 PM

QUOTE (heatherbell89 @ 21/10/2011, 06:45 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Just googled this for you http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/b...ef_options?open

Maybe your partner is thinking that it will b eyou in pain so you should make the decisions? I would have slapped my DH if he had "banned" me from using a specific form of pain relief!



thanks.

#20 ecb

Posted 21 October 2011 - 07:17 PM

QUOTE
what do u mean by intermitten monitoring?

I mean where they hook the monitors up to you for a few mins every so often rather than strapping them to you permanently. As soon as they are on your permanently you are tied to the bed and it's better to be able to move around.

Can you google hypno birthing or calm birthing courses in your area (they are not usually run by hospitals - mostly privately run courses). You'll learn the skill of focussing other than on your pain or your emotions. You do sound enormously distressed already (which is fair enough, childbirth is frightening when you don't know what you are in for and twin childbirth obviously even more so). I am so sorry you are feeling sonpoorly supported by your hospital. Ask to have a meeting with one of the midwives when you are in for one of your next appointments. They will be more practical about the birth stuff and hopefully be able to put your mind (and emotions) and ease a little. Does your DH know how stressed you are?

#21 Lozzaoh

Posted 21 October 2011 - 07:32 PM

If you are thinking about using gas I would perhaps get a mouthpiece of some description or even a party blower thing and get used to breathing through it. I decided half way through that I wanted to use gas but then felt like I was going to hyperventilate (spelling?) before I even had the first contraction with it due to just feeling like I wouldn't be able to breath through the mouthpiece.
Other than that hope like crazy you get a good midwife. I basically tried everything mine suggested that wasn't drugs, a whole heap of different positions, shower, bath. They have done it a million times so often can have a lot of useful suggestions that don't involve drugs.

#22 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 08:17 PM

QUOTE (ecb @ 21/10/2011, 08:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I mean where they hook the monitors up to you for a few mins every so often rather than strapping them to you permanently. As soon as they are on your permanently you are tied to the bed and it's better to be able to move around.

Can you google hypno birthing or calm birthing courses in your area (they are not usually run by hospitals - mostly privately run courses). You'll learn the skill of focussing other than on your pain or your emotions. You do sound enormously distressed already (which is fair enough, childbirth is frightening when you don't know what you are in for and twin childbirth obviously even more so). I am so sorry you are feeling sonpoorly supported by your hospital. Ask to have a meeting with one of the midwives when you are in for one of your next appointments. They will be more practical about the birth stuff and hopefully be able to put your mind (and emotions) and ease a little. Does your DH know how stressed you are?


there arnt even antenatal classes in my area execpt from the hospital. that and i dont really have alot of money for most things. i doubt id even be able to afford the antenatal classes at the hospital if i was doing them.


i cant have midewife care. and when i had to talk to midwives once before one of them was mocking me.


yea he does but theres nth much he can do. he trys to get me to relax but it doesnt really work and then he feels horrible cause theres nothing he can do and that upsets me more :/



ah what can i say im a stress head XD
and ive been trying to relax but... yea...

#23 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 08:19 PM

QUOTE (Lozzaoh @ 21/10/2011, 08:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you are thinking about using gas I would perhaps get a mouthpiece of some description or even a party blower thing and get used to breathing through it. I decided half way through that I wanted to use gas but then felt like I was going to hyperventilate (spelling?) before I even had the first contraction with it due to just feeling like I wouldn't be able to breath through the mouthpiece.
Other than that hope like crazy you get a good midwife. I basically tried everything mine suggested that wasn't drugs, a whole heap of different positions, shower, bath. They have done it a million times so often can have a lot of useful suggestions that don't involve drugs.



yea ive had gas before when i was younger. felt like i was suffocating :/.
ok. im alittle unsure about the midwives at the hospital because of what happend to my friend :/

#24 =R2=

Posted 21 October 2011 - 08:32 PM

Twins .... tricky.

Basically for twin labour, the hospital will have a pretty strict protocol that you need to consider and negotiate with them and will probably include:

1) Twin 1 needs to be head down
2) IV cannula inserted
3) Continuous as opposed to intermittent monitoring (Twin 1 to have a foetal scalp electrode inserted)
4) Early epidural
5) Syntocinon infusion
6) controlled ARM of Twin 2's membranes straight after Twin 1 is born

You need to discuss what your hospital's expectations are as well your preferences for birth with your midwife/OB. I'm a bit surprised that you made it to 31 weeks without some sort of plan.

#25 battymeep

Posted 21 October 2011 - 08:46 PM

QUOTE (=R2= @ 21/10/2011, 09:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Twins .... tricky.

Basically for twin labour, the hospital will have a pretty strict protocol that you need to consider and negotiate with them and will probably include:

1) Twin 1 needs to be head down
2) IV cannula inserted
3) Continuous as opposed to intermittent monitoring (Twin 1 to have a foetal scalp electrode inserted)
4) Early epidural
5) Syntocinon infusion
6) controlled ARM of Twin 2's membranes straight after Twin 1 is born

You need to discuss what your hospital's expectations are as well your preferences for birth with your midwife/OB. I'm a bit surprised that you made it to 31 weeks without some sort of plan.


my antenatal appointments still havent mentioned it. it was an outside midwife i have to see that has brought it up.

i did ask about the policy and they said it depends on the doc..
and they havent mentioned anything like that to me or in the book they gave me



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