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primary schools in brisbane: Bardon area, Ascot?
Moving to Brisbane - looking for an area with great schools


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9 replies to this topic

#1 milkwood

Posted 14 October 2011 - 10:01 PM

Work might offer the opportunity to move to Brisbane.  We love the look of the Bardon/Ashgrove area and there seem to be heaps of lovely schools, Bardon, Rainworth, Ithaca creek, Ashgrove etc.  Are there differences between the school cultures and if so what are they?  

We are a same sex family and would love to move to an area that will be fine with our family, or at least open to discussion and willing to ask questions to get there head around it.

Thanks in advance.  

P.S. Ascot also looks lovely.  Anyone from the Ascot area?  Ascot SS?

#2 censura carnero

Posted 15 October 2011 - 04:56 PM

They are all gorgeous suburbs and all the schools I hear have great reputations.  In Brisbane if you live in a desirable suburb the state schools are also quite good.

Edited by censura carnero, 15 October 2011 - 04:56 PM.


#3 2bundles

Posted 16 October 2011 - 01:37 PM

The schools you mention are all good.  Bardon SS has a rep for being a bit alternate.  Composite classes, small school etc.  I have heard very good things.  

Ithaca Ck and Petrie Tce SS are also composite classes.

Ashgrove is very big, but will offer more opportunities for sport etc.  Rainworth is smaller, but not composite classes.  Also very good rep, but some of the parent group are a little high maintenance.

I live nearby, so feel free to PM me.

Ascot has a good rep, but Ascot is very different to Bardon.  More traditional financially well off demographic.




#4 milkwood

Posted 18 October 2011 - 09:15 PM

Thank-you both for your comments so far.  I guess this is all a bit specific if you live elsewhere.  Indooroopilly ss also looks absolutely terrific on paper, and Ironside SS does too, so additional thought on these are welcome.

I guess a feel for how these schools might respond to children with only mothers might be a bit difficult to read if there aren't families like ours there already, but a general feel for the overall style would be great.

Thanks again.

#5 =R2=

Posted 18 October 2011 - 09:22 PM

I'm biased as I live in that area of Brisbane. PP was right - it's a great community minded area with fantastic schools. All the schools mentioned all have great reputations and very family oriented.

#6 censura carnero

Posted 20 October 2011 - 09:59 PM

I just wouldn't make a big deal out of being a same sex couple. In the same way that other families don't make a big deal out of being hetero or single parents.  In terms of not being judged and assimilating into the school culture effortlessly well I don't think there will be many people who can guide you in that area in terms of specific schools.  However, perhaps the closer you get to the city the more that it will be a non event.  Small communities and country towns are more likely to make a big deal out of it.  Perhaps, look at larger schools if you don't want to be scrutinised as they are statistically more likely to have diverse families that may include other same sex parents.  THe smaller the school the more likely hood for gossip.

Such a shame that you even have to think about such a thing.  Hopefully, one day it will be a complete non-event.  All the best to you and your family finding the right school.

#7 greengoddess

Posted 20 October 2011 - 11:02 PM

Rainworth SS has always had a terrific reputation. I can recommend Indooroopilly - I grew up there and went to Indooroopilly State School (but that was some decades ago). Ironside is always well-regarded.

If you wanted to look slightly further out - Sherwood is great little school.



#8 milkwood

Posted 25 October 2011 - 12:12 PM

Thank-you all for your responses.  
Censura Carnero thanks for your comments.  It is odd, you can't be parent of a school aged child until they start. There is no training for any of us.  I started out exactly as you suggested, like this is so non-news, we will focus on the things that matter, like finding friends you like and have things in common with.  Really, it is not 1989, PENNY WONG is having a baby, Tod Kenny... this really is not news.  But it was.  It just was.  In really big ways and in little ways.  Everyone was very polite, but they just had no points of reference "How does that work? I don't understand what you are talking about..."  It would have been funny, except it is the beginning of school life.
And yet you all make it sound so easy and straight forward.  I might just be able to stay myself, not worrying about the conformation of the family and how to be a quasi-educator, but just enjoying it!


#9 censura carnero

Posted 25 October 2011 - 09:02 PM

QUOTE (milkwood @ 25/10/2011, 12:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thank-you all for your responses.  
Censura Carnero thanks for your comments.  It is odd, you can't be parent of a school aged child until they start. There is no training for any of us.  I started out exactly as you suggested, like this is so non-news, we will focus on the things that matter, like finding friends you like and have things in common with.  Really, it is not 1989, PENNY WONG is having a baby, Tod Kenny... this really is not news.  But it was.  It just was.  In really big ways and in little ways.  Everyone was very polite, but they just had no points of reference "How does that work? I don't understand what you are talking about..."  It would have been funny, except it is the beginning of school life.
And yet you all make it sound so easy and straight forward.  I might just be able to stay myself, not worrying about the conformation of the family and how to be a quasi-educator, but just enjoying it!


Milkwood I'm not trying to minimise your feelings so I apologise if I have done so.  I can't speak from experience but as a teacher I'm just trying  to tell you what I think.  Certainly not what I know.  As someone who  is very supportive of same sex couples having children, I think even I would be curious and interested enough to want to ask questions that might seem silly or naive.  I remember when my neighbours told me ten years ago they were expecting a child.  I really wanted to ask how they conceived but I felt it was too rude.  And quite frankly it was, so I didn't.

Upper middle class suburbs in Brisbane are just not as progressive as perhaps other capital cities within Australia.  Perhaps people  are coming across as unsure because it's different to their experiences and not from a position of judgement. The primary school that my child attends is very inclusive.  I really think that I and others would befriend you based on our ability to  get to know you through volunteering, attending social events, chats at the front gate etc.  So that any preconceived ideas were challenged by actually getting to know you as individuals and not the label of the lesbian mummies.

It does frustrate me that schools and their families can't embrace all types of families.  I live in hope that one day they will.  Good luck with  your decisions.

#10 milkwood

Posted 26 October 2011 - 09:40 AM

I liked you response, it just seemed like your thoughts, which is refreshing!  I like questions, and am happy to answer them.  The alternative can be people never actually get to know each other and that is rather quiet, and people go on assuming things... We are all very naive about some things.

I am not in Brisbane at the moment, so have no experience of how people might react to our family.  My recent experience is all elsewhere.  When I have been to Brisbane before everyone was totally, totally fine with us as a couple. original.gif






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