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Safer Eating In Pregnancy


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#1 Nut

Posted 10 November 2010 - 02:20 PM

Disclaimer

        The information contained within this post is taken from the  NSW Food Authority Website. These are not recommendations written by EB and any  choices you make in regard to food consumption are your own. This is only here to help as a guide line. Should  you require more information, speak to your health care provider. You can view  the full PDF file HERE or look at the NSW Food Authority Website.

        What is Listeria?

                                Listeria is a type of bacteria found in some foods which causes a serious infection called listeriosis. It can take up to six weeks for the flu-like symptoms to occur and if transmitted to your unborn baby can lead to miscarriage, infection of your newborn and stillbirth. The best way to avoid this is through hygienic preparation, storing and handling of food. Ideally, you should eat only freshly cooked food and well-washed, (freshly prepared) fruit and vegetables. Leftovers can be eaten if they are refrigerated promptly and
kept no longer than a day.

    These mostly chilled, ready to eat foods should be  avoided altogether:

    • Soft and semi-soft cheese (OK if cooked)

    • Cold cooked chicken

    • Cold processed meats

    • Prepared salads

    • Raw seafood

    • Soft serve ice-cream

    • Unpasteurised dairy products

    • Paté

    Salmonella

            Salmonella can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps,  diarrhoea, fever and headache. Pregnant women are not at an increased risk of  contracting salmonellosis, but in rare cases it may trigger miscarriage.

        So it’s advisable to avoid foods that contain raw egg and  always cook meat, chicken and eggs thoroughly.


            In addition, the  NSW Food Authority recommends that pregnant women do not eat any type of sprout  (including alfalfa sprouts, broccoli sprouts, onion sprouts, sunflower sprouts,  clover sprouts, radish sprouts, snowpea sprouts, mung beans and soybeans) either  raw or lightly cooked.

    Other food risks

    Toxoplasmosis

                        Toxoplasmosis while uncommon in pregnant women can occur if  you eat the garden. It is particularly important to avoid  toxoplasmosis during pregnancy undercooked meats, or unwashed fruit and vegetables  (particularly from gardens with household cats). Most commonly, however, infection is  caused by touching cat and dog faeces when cleaning the kitty litter tray or  contaminated soil in because it can lead to brain damage or blindness in your  unborn child.

    Tips for avoiding toxoplasmosis:

    • Don’t eat undercooked or raw meat

    • Don’t drink unpasteurised goat’s milk

    • Don’t handle cat litter

    • When gardening wear gloves

    • Always wash your hands after

    touching animals

    Mercury in fish

                            Fish are rich in protein and minerals, low in saturated fat,  and contain Omega 3 Although it’s really  important to eat fish during pregnancy and breastfeeding, you need to be careful  about which fish you choose. That’s because some fish may contain mercury levels  that may harm an unborn baby or young child’s developing nervous system. fatty acids. Omega 3 fatty acids are important for the  development of the central nervous system in babies, before and after they are born.

        The following table will  help you safely include fish as an important part of a balanced diet.

        Eat 2-3 serves per week of  small fish. Fish should be small enough to fit on a plate.

    Examples: Mackerel, Silver  Warehou, Bream, Snapper, Trevally, Whiting, Flathead,

    Kingfish, canned Tuna  & Salmon, Herrings, Sardines, shellfish, Lobster, Octopus

        OR

        1 serve per fortnight of  Shark (Flake) or Billfish (Broadbill, Swordfish and Marlin)

    and no other fish that  fortnight

        OR

    1 serve per week of  Catfish or Orange Roughy (Deep Sea Perch)

    and no other fish that  week

        Also watch out for…

        Alcohol

    Drinking alcohol during  pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature birth

    or your baby could be born  with foetal alcohol syndrome (slow growth before and

    after birth, and mental  disabilities). As it is not known whether there is a safe level of

    drinking during pregnancy  the National Health and Medical Research Council advises

    women that it is best not  to drink during pregnancy.



Caffeine

    Small amounts of caffeine  are safe during pregnancy but excessive volumes may increase

    the risk of miscarriage  and premature birth. Caffeine is in coffee, tea, chocolate and

    cola (and some other soft  drinks). NSW Health recommends that pregnant women limit

    themselves to 200mg of  caffeine daily. That is 2 cups of ground coffee or 2 1/2 cups

    instant coffee, 4 cups  medium-strength tea, 4 cups cocoa/hot chocolate or 6 cups of cola.



    Smoking

    Smoking is dangerous for  your baby. Smoking increases the risk of premature birth,

    low birth weight,  respiratory problems and SIDS. There is no safe level of smoking.

    For help to quit smoking  call the Quitline on 131848.

    

Safer Eating In Pregnancy


        Red = Don't Eat


    Orange  = Eat with caution

    Green = OK

        Meat,  Poultry and Seafood

Processed Meats - Ham, salami, luncheon, chicken  meat etc. - Do not eat unless fully cooked.

    Raw meat - Any raw  meat, raw chicken or other poultry, beef, pork etc. - Don’t eat

    Poultry - Cold  chicken or turkey e.g. used in sandwich bars - Don’t eat

    Hot take-away chicken - Purchase freshly cooked,  use immediately, store leftovers in fridge and use within a day of cooking

    Home cooked Chicken - Ensure chicken is cooked thoroughly, use immediately  �" store any leftovers in fridge and use within a day of cooking.

    Paté-  Refrigerated  paté or meat spreads - Don’t eat

    Seafood - Raw seafood  Don’t eat

    Ready-to-eat chilled peeled prawns - Don’t eat

    Cooked fish and seafood - Cook until steaming hot, eat while hot, store  leftovers in the fridge and use within a day of cooking

    Sushi Store-bought - Don’t eat

    Home-made - Don’t use raw meat or seafood, eat immediately

    Cooked meats - Beef,  pork, chicken, mince - Cook thoroughly,  eat while hot

                                Dairy  and Eggs

        Cheese Soft and semi-soft cheese - brie,  camembert, ricotta, fetta, blue etc. - Don’t eat unless in a fully  cooked dish e.g. spinach and ricotta canneloni

    Processed cheese - cheese spreads, cottage  cheese, cream cheese etc. - Store in the fridge, eat within two days of opening  pack

    Hard cheese-  e.g. cheddar, tasty cheese - Store in the fridge

    Ice cream Soft serve - Don’t eat

    Packaged  frozen ice cream - Keep and eat frozen

    Unpasturised  Milk - Don’t drink or use

    Pasteurised Milk- Keep  refrigerated, drink within ‘use by’ date

    Other dairy - Cream,  yoghurt - Check ‘best before’ or ‘use by’ date, keep refrigerated

    Custard - Don’t eat unless heated until steaming hot

    Eggs - Cook  thoroughly

    

    Vegetable & fruit  Salads

        Pre-prepared or pre-packaged  - salads, including fruit salad e.g. from salad bars, smorgasboards  - Don’t eat

    Home-made - Wash and dry salad ingredients well just before making  and eating salads, store any leftover salads in fridge and use within a day of  preparation

    Fruit - Whole  fresh fruits Wash and dry well before eating

        Vegetables and herbs

        Fresh vegetables and herbs  - Wash and dry  well just before eating raw or wash before cooking

    Frozen vegetables - Cook; don’t eat uncooked

    Bean  sprouts - Alfalfa sprouts, broccoli sprouts, onion sprouts, sunflower sprouts,  clover sprouts, radish sprouts, snowpea sprouts, mung beans and soybeans - Don’t  eat raw or lightly cooked

        Other foods

        Leftovers  - Cooked foods Store leftovers covered in the fridge, eat within a  day and always reheat until steaming hot

        Canned  foods - Tinned fruit, vegetables, fish etc. - Store unused portions in  the fridge in clean, sealed containers and use within a day

        Stuffing  - Stuffing from chicken or poultry - Don’t eat unless cooked  separately and eat hot

        Hummus - Store-bought  or home-made Store in fridge, eat within 2 days of opening/making

     Note: Listerosis is killed by heat. You can eat pretty much anything as long as it's cooked thoroughly right through. If you have any concerns about something you have eaten or if you think you may have listeriosis, please contact your doctor.

#2 *mylittleprince*

Posted 10 November 2010 - 02:30 PM

Thanks for posting. Hopefully the members bragging about the wrong foods they ate during pregnancy will read this.

#3 ChantelM

Posted 12 November 2010 - 06:37 AM

Thanks for the list. There were a couple of things on there that I thought were ok to eat.

I have heard conflicting stories about prawns. The last I heard was that a cooked prawn was ok to eat. Now I feel guilty. I did only eat a couple though. I think I will stay clear unless they are hot now. Is that ok?

And Custard. I haven't had any yet but wouldn't have even thought about that being bad.



#4 Nut

Posted 12 November 2010 - 07:18 AM

Might be referring to egg custard. I think if you make it fresh using a packet mix or buy the premade ones they should be OK, much like mayonaise. I am not sure on that one though so perhaps it's worth asking about for those who really want custard.

QUOTE
Seafood - Raw seafood Don’t eat

Ready-to-eat chilled peeled prawns - Don’t eat

Cooked fish and seafood - Cook until steaming hot, eat while hot, store leftovers in the fridge and use within a day of cooking


I would say this means that chilled prawns (raw or cooked) should not be eaten but hot cooked prawns are OK.

#5 Podlettte

Posted 15 November 2010 - 09:40 PM

with the mayonaise in jars form the supermarket question...

does that include whole egg mayo and the japanese Kewpie mayo (in the teardrop shaped squeezey bottle)?

I'm avoiding them anyway, but my favourite dish is Okonomiyaki and it requires the kewpie mayo on top, if it's not ok and whole egg mayo in a jar is ok, then yay! original.gif

oh and Ham off the bone cooked pre or post slicing?

Edited by Podlettte, 15 November 2010 - 09:41 PM.


#6 Nut

Posted 16 November 2010 - 10:00 PM

I believe (and note I am no expert on the subject so I am not in any way suggesting anything is OK, just my own interpretation) that jars of mayo are OK because they are pasturised and go through processes to kill off pathogens and so forth. It's more fresh mayo made with raw eggs that they recommend you avoid.

Same with meat. Needs to be hot when you're eating it. If you cook it before slicing it but eat it immediately the bacteria will be killed off. If you cook it and stick it in the fridge, heat it up before you eat it.



#7 Podlettte

Posted 17 November 2010 - 12:07 PM

Thanks Nut, appreciate your comments and of course understand you're not an expert etc.  I'll double check with my Dr when I speak with her next, or the ante natal clinic when I book in.

I've printed off the food authority thing for my DH and will laminate to stick on the fridge and also for my parents (who are doing chrissy lunch this year).



#8 sam_gamgee

Posted 23 November 2010 - 09:10 PM

My understanding re meats etc - a temperature of 70C kills listeria.  So meat that has been cooked to that temp doesn't have to be eaten hot, but should be eaten within 24 hours of cooking.  (Obviously should also be refrigerated properly.)  I can't see any problem with (say) a sandwich for lunch made with cold roast beef straight from the fridge, that was cooked the night before.

Edited by sam_gamgee, 23 November 2010 - 09:13 PM.


#9 missmama

Posted 15 December 2010 - 11:43 AM

This is soooo interesting.. thanks for the info original.gif

#10 Marina_

Posted 27 December 2010 - 08:16 PM

great info, thank you

does anyone know the concern about Hommus?

#11 MBMK

Posted 05 January 2011 - 03:28 PM

Just a quick one - I'm newly pregnant (5 weeks) and stupidly ate roast chicken from the supermarket today and yesterday in my sandwich. It was quite cool and I had it with mayo  oomg2.gif

At the time I avoided ham due to the risks and assumed the chicken was ok because it had been 'cooked' now I'm worried of the damage I may have caused...

What do you think??

#12 Nut

Posted 06 January 2011 - 07:56 AM

MBMK - Try not to freak out. The mayo is not a likely concern if it was in a jar from the supermarket (and eggs are only a risk of food poisoning, not listeria so they are not as great a concern).

The chances of getting listeria are very very low. The guidelines are there not because you HAVE to follow them, but they are the foods recommended be avoided because of everything, they carry the highest chances. But you can eat 500 wheels of brie and not get anything.

I am not saying everyone should go out and gorge on all these things, just that chances are you're fine and should not get too stressed about making a mistake.

I ate a mcflurry, I had brie and a few other things you shouldn't have in pregnancy. Plus at least at this stage the placenta is not functional so the baby is not getting anything directly from you. If you did by chance contract listeria it's probably not as likely to cause harm now, but later in pregnancy can be very nasty.

This is just my general opinion though. I am not trained in medicine and this certainly can't be taken as gospel. But try not to stress about this. The risk is marginal. It exists, but it's marginal.

#13 TwinMumNat

Posted 19 January 2011 - 06:27 PM

Hi everyone

I work outside the home and am concerned about what to eat for lunch.

I am wondering whether it is safe to eat salad from a bag if I wash it and dry it again myself.
What about a salad Ive prepared for lunch the night before?

Is it risky to eat a salad sandwich prepared for you from a very clean canteen?

With my two previous pregnancies I gained 30 kg (granted one was a twin pregnancy) and I dont want to gain that amount again! But I am terrified of listeria....Any advice?



#14 Teeny Bopper

Posted 03 February 2011 - 11:51 AM

Hi all,

I'm not pregnant yet, but have read that while TTC you should behave as though you ARE already pregnant... especially during the 2WW. Generally my diet is pretty good and since we started TTC i have given up coffee, soft drinks, sandwich meats, diet yoghurts, and nurofen. I don't drink or smoke so that's an added bonus. I have a few questions regarding the following during pregnancy....

Soy milk??  - i have read so many conflicting reports. Some say it's fine others say that the phytoestrogens (?) it contains may negatively effect the baby. I don't like regular cows milk and am concerned about my calcium intake. I've switched to full-fat yoghurt but only eat a small amount per day.

Protein Powder??  Not the meal replacement stuff formulated for weight loss, I mean the full on protein powder that body-builders use. I have a massive tub of it left over from my training days and have it with soy milk a few times a week as a quick and easy lunch. Are there any particular ingredients i should check for that need to be avoided??

TIA original.gif

#15 silverbubble

Posted 15 February 2011 - 03:46 PM

hi,
just wondering if salami is ok to eat on pizza?
Thanks... i love pepperoni pizza!

#16 glowlight

Posted 20 February 2011 - 06:11 AM

QUOTE (Princess Teeny @ 03/02/2011, 12:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi all,

I'm not pregnant yet, but have read that while TTC you should behave as though you ARE already pregnant... especially during the 2WW. Generally my diet is pretty good and since we started TTC i have given up coffee, soft drinks, sandwich meats, diet yoghurts, and nurofen. I don't drink or smoke so that's an added bonus. I have a few questions regarding the following during pregnancy....

Soy milk??  - i have read so many conflicting reports. Some say it's fine others say that the phytoestrogens (?) it contains may negatively effect the baby. I don't like regular cows milk and am concerned about my calcium intake. I've switched to full-fat yoghurt but only eat a small amount per day.

Protein Powder??  Not the meal replacement stuff formulated for weight loss, I mean the full on protein powder that body-builders use. I have a massive tub of it left over from my training days and have it with soy milk a few times a week as a quick and easy lunch. Are there any particular ingredients i should check for that need to be avoided??

TIA original.gif


I don't drink Cow's milk or soy but I drink rice milk and it's fortified with calcium. Sesame seeds also have calcium in them as lots of other foods. I've read that soy can impact on fertility so I avoided it when TTC.

#17 aphraell

Posted 20 February 2011 - 07:41 AM

There are mixed reports about soy, but from personal experience i have not found that a little bit causes problems. I am dairy intolerant so any milk I have (usually a decaf coffee and a couple of cups of tea) is soy milk. I also have a bit of tofu and eat she eps yoghurt(for extra calcium source). I fell pregnant first cycle both times.


#18 Duck-o-lah

Posted 20 February 2011 - 07:52 AM

QUOTE
does anyone know the concern about Hommus?
I can't see why hommus would be a problem. I think they key is to eat while fresh, much like everything during pregnancy. I wouldn't think twice about using hommus that has been in the fridge a week after opening, but while pregnant I would be more strict on how long after opening I would eat anything.

#19 Becky86

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:46 AM

QUOTE (sam_gamgee @ 23/11/2010, 09:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My understanding re meats etc - a temperature of 70C kills listeria. So meat that has been cooked to that temp doesn't have to be eaten hot, but should be eaten within 24 hours of cooking. (Obviously should also be refrigerated properly.) I can't see any problem with (say) a sandwich for lunch made with cold roast beef straight from the fridge, that was cooked the night before.


I agree, i will think twice about a couple things eg. cheese's n dairy, but eating left over cold meat from the night before?? if its cooked properly to begin with & stored in fridge properly i dont see the problem. Totally agree with sam_gamgee on this one!

#20 illia

Posted 03 March 2011 - 09:49 AM

What is the risk with bean sprouts, mung beans, etc?

#21 Nut

Posted 04 March 2011 - 11:41 AM

Meats - Listeria is one of the only bacteria that thrives in the fridge and will grow faster in acold environment. The recommendation is to only eat meat HOT. Suggests that home cooked cold meats is not a go. You can cook it, cool it quickly in the fridge for a few minutes and then eat it, but should not eat it after it's been sitting for a while, refrigerated or not.

Soy - There are suggestions that soy is not a good option for anyone. It supposedly has a property that is close to oestrogen and can have negative hormonal effects.

Have you tried Zymil? It's sweeter than normal cows milk. Otherwise there is rice milk or goats milk. Maybe try some of the other options if you wish to avoid soy.

Beans/sprouts etc - I am not 100% sure but I was told by a nutritonist to avoid packaged salad products, even just bags of loose lettuce. I expect it's for the same reason.



#22 Miss Kitty-Cat

Posted 03 May 2011 - 12:11 PM

Interesting article:

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/home-cook-fined-...0502-1e57p.html

Shows you do have to be careful.

#23 Mom135

Posted 04 May 2011 - 04:54 PM

Excellent info, thanks

#24 porkchop's mama

Posted 10 August 2011 - 08:08 AM

My first decaf skim cauppucino with only 1 tsp of raw sugar is not going down well.

It's only been weeks but I miss sushi so much.....

#25 .MrsM.

Posted 11 August 2011 - 01:33 AM

im a bit confused about whether what you eat or drink in the 2ww will affect your chances of a successful cycle? i read somewhere that it does not take any nutrients from the mother for a few weeks? shrug.gif




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