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Going overseas for donor eggs
egg donation overseas


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#1 Possmanda

Posted 16 May 2010 - 04:46 PM

Most of what I've read in the blogs has been on egg donation here in Australia.  What I'm curious about is if there is anyone who has gone overseas for egg donation and what were their reasons?

Our reasons were: we had no relatives here that were able or willing to donate; we wanted to choose our donor, rather than the other way around;  we didn't want to ask strangers for a donation (we were told to ask our hairdresser - do people really get donors that way?); the price was comparable to Australia for us (and we ended up with a holiday on top); and it was done quite quickly - within 3 months of the initial inquiry, we were back in Australia and I was pregnant!  I would have done it years ago rather than waste my time and money over and over with cycles that never stood a chance of working!

For those who are doing it in Australia, what are your reasons?  Are they financial?  Ethical?

#2 louisem

Posted 16 May 2010 - 05:39 PM

Hi I really feel for you and so I'm happy to share some of my own journey with you.
My doctor actually suggested overseas donation and I'm so happy I went with this - I now have beautiful triplet boys! At the time, there was a shortage of egg donors in Australia - probably even more so now, because although potential donors are now more aware of the need, the need seems to be growing.
I tried advertising for a donor here, but 2 women (illegally) asked for money and with others, they either lived too far away or it just didn't feel right. I was concerned in a couple of cases that the women might have unmet needs and/or become dependant or even a little dangerous. I know there are MANY fantastic donors out there, so please, this was just my experience with a couple of people.
I PREFERRED to go overseas as there is an arms-length separation. I did not meet the donor.
By the way, I don't agree that we need to know everything about the donor - the donor is not the mother, but rather a wonderful giver of POTENTIAL - how the baby develops inside you depends on your effort, body chemistry, nutrition, positive attidude etc. We knew that the donor was completely screened for diseases and conditions, and that she had enough generosity to donate eggs which she no longer needed from her own efforts to create a family - as empathy and generosity are now thought to have some genetic component, I was very happy with the situation.
The medical cost was similar to in Australia - the main cost is travelling to and from the overseas location and all the associated hotel costs, etc.
But all the effort, anxiety, waiting, costs were ALL worth it.
I'm happy to chat more about this, just let me know.
I wish you all the very best on your journey.

#3 bjc24

Posted 19 May 2010 - 10:32 AM

QUOTE (louisem @ 16/05/2010, 05:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi I really feel for you and so I'm happy to share some of my own journey with you.
My doctor actually suggested overseas donation and I'm so happy I went with this - I now have beautiful triplet boys! At the time, there was a shortage of egg donors in Australia - probably even more so now, because although potential donors are now more aware of the need, the need seems to be growing.
I tried advertising for a donor here, but 2 women (illegally) asked for money and with others, they either lived too far away or it just didn't feel right. I was concerned in a couple of cases that the women might have unmet needs and/or become dependant or even a little dangerous. I know there are MANY fantastic donors out there, so please, this was just my experience with a couple of people.
I PREFERRED to go overseas as there is an arms-length separation. I did not meet the donor.
By the way, I don't agree that we need to know everything about the donor - the donor is not the mother, but rather a wonderful giver of POTENTIAL - how the baby develops inside you depends on your effort, body chemistry, nutrition, positive attidude etc. We knew that the donor was completely screened for diseases and conditions, and that she had enough generosity to donate eggs which she no longer needed from her own efforts to create a family - as empathy and generosity are now thought to have some genetic component, I was very happy with the situation.
The medical cost was similar to in Australia - the main cost is travelling to and from the overseas location and all the associated hotel costs, etc.
But all the effort, anxiety, waiting, costs were ALL worth it.
I'm happy to chat more about this, just let me know.
I wish you all the very best on your journey.


#4 bjc24

Posted 19 May 2010 - 10:36 AM

Hi girls
I am usually not on this forum, usually on TTC over 40s but I am curious as to your posts as I am now going down the donor egg route. I am grateful for your information as there is SO MUCH OUT THERE! It is hard to know what it best. You both were successful and at the end of the day, that is all I want. THe cost is huge as you know, but worth it if you get a result. I have done a lot of research and I think we will go to US. We have short listed some donors. However, what I would like to know is success rates. It seems that the place we are looking at in La Jolla california has an 80% success rate yet others only 60 or so. I would love to hear more about your experiences. If there is anyway I can contact you please let me know. I am 44 and totally exhausted. Just want to get this happening asap but worried that we wont have success. Perhaps you could advise me how to ensure most likely positive result. All advice very welcome. Thanks girls.





QUOTE (louisem @ 16/05/2010, 05:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi I really feel for you and so I'm happy to share some of my own journey with you.
My doctor actually suggested overseas donation and I'm so happy I went with this - I now have beautiful triplet boys! At the time, there was a shortage of egg donors in Australia - probably even more so now, because although potential donors are now more aware of the need, the need seems to be growing.
I tried advertising for a donor here, but 2 women (illegally) asked for money and with others, they either lived too far away or it just didn't feel right. I was concerned in a couple of cases that the women might have unmet needs and/or become dependant or even a little dangerous. I know there are MANY fantastic donors out there, so please, this was just my experience with a couple of people.
I PREFERRED to go overseas as there is an arms-length separation. I did not meet the donor.
By the way, I don't agree that we need to know everything about the donor - the donor is not the mother, but rather a wonderful giver of POTENTIAL - how the baby develops inside you depends on your effort, body chemistry, nutrition, positive attidude etc. We knew that the donor was completely screened for diseases and conditions, and that she had enough generosity to donate eggs which she no longer needed from her own efforts to create a family - as empathy and generosity are now thought to have some genetic component, I was very happy with the situation.
The medical cost was similar to in Australia - the main cost is travelling to and from the overseas location and all the associated hotel costs, etc.
But all the effort, anxiety, waiting, costs were ALL worth it.
I'm happy to chat more about this, just let me know.
I wish you all the very best on your journey.


#5 Possmanda

Posted 19 May 2010 - 04:36 PM

Hi bjc24, I've just turned 43 and I have spent over 20 years either doing IVF or saving up to do IVF; I felt the same as you do - exhausted!

We went to South Africa - it was considerably cheaper than the US, we could still pick our donor and saw both baby pictures and adult pictures of our donor (we dealt with a company that was actually based in California, so could show the adult photos; agencies that are based in South Africa aren't allowed to).  We chose to go to Johannesburg, as there were direct flights there for us.  The experience was wonderful in comparison to Australia.  Our nurse was contactable 24/7; she even rang on her day off to let us know the numbers of embryos still developing.  The lab was modern, clean and quiet and there were no blaring lights or half a dozen students in the same room.  We chose to have 2 embryos replaced rather than 1, because, let's face it, I was no spring chicken!  My problem relates to endometriosis tying back my tubes - the sperm wasn't getting to the eggs.  By the time I could afford the IVF treatment though, I was going through perimenopause and my eggs were hard boiled!

My donor was willing to donate for altruisic purposes, but also because there was a reasonable fee to compensate her for her time and energy.  I don't care for the Australian policy of not paying donors reasonable fees for their time and energy.  I find that it deters many potential donors, and some of the donors that are still willing to donate seem to be unduly interested beyond the donation - they want pictures and yearly updates, they want to chose  who the donation goes to (which would be unacceptable for other body parts), etc.  I think that for some donors, its more of a case of lending an egg, rather than donating!  That said, there are many who are generous in their spirit anyway, but I think giving a reasonable fee would actually help put it into perspective for some donors.

Even with the fee, our costs were comparable with Australia - we paid about $15,000 all up, of which $5000 was flights and accommodation, and the rest was towards the donor, the treatment, all the medications, etc.  Now that the Australian dollars is so good against the greenback, it would probably be even cheaper.  We even got to go to Zambia to see the Victoria Falls and went on a safari for 3 days.  So even if treatment wasn't successful, we figured that we had had a wonderful holiday (and it helped stop me from obsessing over every little twinge or buying up loads of hpts!).  As it happens, we ended up with stowaways...

But you want to know success rates - our clinic said between 75 to 80%.  We took into account my age and the many, many years of failure at IVF and the distance we were travelling, and asked for them to replace 2 of embryos.  Both grew, developed and we have 2 healthy, perky kids who look a great deal like ours would probably have looked, had we been successful with my eggs.  Our donor was 30 when she donated, had already had her 2 children and didn't want any more, so was a proven donor if you like. She produced 9 eggs, of which 7 became embryos, and 5 went on to blastocyts, so very high quality!  We have 3 frozen in case we want to expand our family, and I think we probably might in a few more years.

My problem was with the tubes being held down by the endo, not with my uterus.  I imagine that if you have problems with the uterus, then that would bring down the success rate anyway.  If, on the other hand, your problem is with hormones, age or blocked tubes, then your chances of success are very much higher.  Again, my husband was fine - any issues with the sperm would also bring down your chances.

Finally, I love these kids, full stop.  I am their biological mother; I grew them, gave birth to them, nurtured them - it may be to a plan that someone else has written with my husband, but I'm the brickie who built them up - without me, those plans would just be a pipe dream.

#6 bjc24

Posted 19 May 2010 - 08:57 PM

Hi Possmanda
Thankyou so much for all that information! If there is any possiblity of seeing photos (adult photos), we would definitely have considered South Africa. We couldn't find a donor agency that did. I wonder if you could email me or post in the PM section for me, what the donor company name was. We estimate around $40 000 to go to the US and we are still struggling to come to terms with this. The SA option is cheaper, it was just the concern with not being able to see adult pictures.
I have no uterus issues, but my partner has low sperm count. Not terribly low, and nothing that ICSI can't bypass. I have children from previous marriage in my 20s, just have old eggs now! Thankyou again for all your help. As soon as I can access donor site I will be madly researching further.



QUOTE (Possmanda @ 19/05/2010, 04:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi bjc24, I've just turned 43 and I have spent over 20 years either doing IVF or saving up to do IVF; I felt the same as you do - exhausted!

We went to South Africa - it was considerably cheaper than the US, we could still pick our donor and saw both baby pictures and adult pictures of our donor (we dealt with a company that was actually based in California, so could show the adult photos; agencies that are based in South Africa aren't allowed to). We chose to go to Johannesburg, as there were direct flights there for us. The experience was wonderful in comparison to Australia. Our nurse was contactable 24/7; she even rang on her day off to let us know the numbers of embryos still developing. The lab was modern, clean and quiet and there were no blaring lights or half a dozen students in the same room. We chose to have 2 embryos replaced rather than 1, because, let's face it, I was no spring chicken! My problem relates to endometriosis tying back my tubes - the sperm wasn't getting to the eggs. By the time I could afford the IVF treatment though, I was going through perimenopause and my eggs were hard boiled!

My donor was willing to donate for altruisic purposes, but also because there was a reasonable fee to compensate her for her time and energy. I don't care for the Australian policy of not paying donors reasonable fees for their time and energy. I find that it deters many potential donors, and some of the donors that are still willing to donate seem to be unduly interested beyond the donation - they want pictures and yearly updates, they want to chose who the donation goes to (which would be unacceptable for other body parts), etc. I think that for some donors, its more of a case of lending an egg, rather than donating! That said, there are many who are generous in their spirit anyway, but I think giving a reasonable fee would actually help put it into perspective for some donors.

Even with the fee, our costs were comparable with Australia - we paid about $15,000 all up, of which $5000 was flights and accommodation, and the rest was towards the donor, the treatment, all the medications, etc. Now that the Australian dollars is so good against the greenback, it would probably be even cheaper. We even got to go to Zambia to see the Victoria Falls and went on a safari for 3 days. So even if treatment wasn't successful, we figured that we had had a wonderful holiday (and it helped stop me from obsessing over every little twinge or buying up loads of hpts!). As it happens, we ended up with stowaways...

But you want to know success rates - our clinic said between 75 to 80%. We took into account my age and the many, many years of failure at IVF and the distance we were travelling, and asked for them to replace 2 of embryos. Both grew, developed and we have 2 healthy, perky kids who look a great deal like ours would probably have looked, had we been successful with my eggs. Our donor was 30 when she donated, had already had her 2 children and didn't want any more, so was a proven donor if you like. She produced 9 eggs, of which 7 became embryos, and 5 went on to blastocyts, so very high quality! We have 3 frozen in case we want to expand our family, and I think we probably might in a few more years.

My problem was with the tubes being held down by the endo, not with my uterus. I imagine that if you have problems with the uterus, then that would bring down the success rate anyway. If, on the other hand, your problem is with hormones, age or blocked tubes, then your chances of success are very much higher. Again, my husband was fine - any issues with the sperm would also bring down your chances.

Finally, I love these kids, full stop. I am their biological mother; I grew them, gave birth to them, nurtured them - it may be to a plan that someone else has written with my husband, but I'm the brickie who built them up - without me, those plans would just be a pipe dream.


#7 smika

Posted 19 May 2010 - 11:18 PM

Hi Possmada,
Wow 20 years of IVF how did you ever do it.  We are in the middle of arranging a donor in Cape Town.  
So why are we going overseas?
We were discouraged from donation here in Australia by nearly everyone who mentioned it (medical professionals - not people who had done it).  Getting an anonymous donor is apparently next to impossible and then there are lots of hurdles to cross.
I was not very comfortable having a friend donate.  I don't want the circumstances of their conception to be the defining thing about my child.  And I think it would be hard not to do that with the donor-mother being present in their lives.  If we are lucky enough to be successful the child will know the way they were conceived but I don’t want it to be a big deal.  Our agency keeps contact details ( like they do here) so one day maybe they can manage contact.  The donors are mostly younger and looking to fund study.  Like me I am sure if they didn't have to go down this road they would not but I am so grateful that it can be done with so much dignity.
We chose Cape Town because I have friends there and have been before and the price is manageable.  It has been really simple so far choosing a donor.  Our agency is Cape Town based and so we have childhood photos only although the donor we have chosen does look about 12-14 in the photo we have seen. We at the commitment stage now so it is a bit daunting.  
Cape Fertility would have facilities comparable to here so I am not worried about the actual procedures.


Really nice to hear your story it has given me a lot of hope, original.gif




#8 Polly Ramos

Posted 20 May 2010 - 12:58 AM

Hello my name is Polly, I live in the USA. I found your website and I am very curious about it all:)

Edited by Polly Ramos, 20 May 2010 - 01:03 AM.


#9 ruby-ruby

Posted 08 July 2010 - 09:17 AM

QUOTE (Possmanda @ 19/05/2010, 04:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi bjc24, I've just turned 43 and I have spent over 20 years either doing IVF or saving up to do IVF; I felt the same as you do - exhausted!

We went to South Africa - it was considerably cheaper than the US, we could still pick our donor and saw both baby pictures and adult pictures of our donor (we dealt with a company that was actually based in California, so could show the adult photos; agencies that are based in South Africa aren't allowed to).  We chose to go to Johannesburg, as there were direct flights there for us.  The experience was wonderful in comparison to Australia.  Our nurse was contactable 24/7; she even rang on her day off to let us know the numbers of embryos still developing.  The lab was modern, clean and quiet and there were no blaring lights or half a dozen students in the same room.  We chose to have 2 embryos replaced rather than 1, because, let's face it, I was no spring chicken!  My problem relates to endometriosis tying back my tubes - the sperm wasn't getting to the eggs.  By the time I could afford the IVF treatment though, I was going through perimenopause and my eggs were hard boiled!

My donor was willing to donate for altruisic purposes, but also because there was a reasonable fee to compensate her for her time and energy.  I don't care for the Australian policy of not paying donors reasonable fees for their time and energy.  I find that it deters many potential donors, and some of the donors that are still willing to donate seem to be unduly interested beyond the donation - they want pictures and yearly updates, they want to chose  who the donation goes to (which would be unacceptable for other body parts), etc.  I think that for some donors, its more of a case of lending an egg, rather than donating!  That said, there are many who are generous in their spirit anyway, but I think giving a reasonable fee would actually help put it into perspective for some donors.

Even with the fee, our costs were comparable with Australia - we paid about $15,000 all up, of which $5000 was flights and accommodation, and the rest was towards the donor, the treatment, all the medications, etc.  Now that the Australian dollars is so good against the greenback, it would probably be even cheaper.  We even got to go to Zambia to see the Victoria Falls and went on a safari for 3 days.  So even if treatment wasn't successful, we figured that we had had a wonderful holiday (and it helped stop me from obsessing over every little twinge or buying up loads of hpts!).  As it happens, we ended up with stowaways...

But you want to know success rates - our clinic said between 75 to 80%.  We took into account my age and the many, many years of failure at IVF and the distance we were travelling, and asked for them to replace 2 of embryos.  Both grew, developed and we have 2 healthy, perky kids who look a great deal like ours would probably have looked, had we been successful with my eggs.  Our donor was 30 when she donated, had already had her 2 children and didn't want any more, so was a proven donor if you like. She produced 9 eggs, of which 7 became embryos, and 5 went on to blastocyts, so very high quality!  We have 3 frozen in case we want to expand our family, and I think we probably might in a few more years.

My problem was with the tubes being held down by the endo, not with my uterus.  I imagine that if you have problems with the uterus, then that would bring down the success rate anyway.  If, on the other hand, your problem is with hormones, age or blocked tubes, then your chances of success are very much higher.  Again, my husband was fine - any issues with the sperm would also bring down your chances.

Finally, I love these kids, full stop.  I am their biological mother; I grew them, gave birth to them, nurtured them - it may be to a plan that someone else has written with my husband, but I'm the brickie who built them up - without me, those plans would just be a pipe dream.

Im 42 and had 5 ivf cycles, one egg,,$15 later no baby..I was considering going o/s to south africa,,How long did you have to stay there ? I so so so want to be a mum...

#10 louisem

Posted 09 July 2010 - 06:58 AM

Hi again everyone
I posted some comments about my overseas donor some time ago and I'd now like to add that I went to a clinic in Athens with whom my doctor in Sydney has personal contacts. I understand that he now also sends people to Barcelona in Spain. I would recommend that you work with a doctor in Australia (or whereever your home country is, for those from the US or elsewhere) as you need to coordinate before and after.
Ican't tell you how happy I am not to have anything to do with the donor - they gave me a beautiful potential but what happened after that is between me and the eggs.... All the best to all

Edited by louisem, 09 July 2010 - 06:59 AM.


#11 pisces00

Posted 09 July 2010 - 10:17 AM

as i have reached the quota of families that a donor can create in Aust, i flew to India and donated there successfully. It was an easier process to do as there wasnt any councelling appointments and all instructions were via email and all results were emailed over. My recipinets , whom i had chatted to extensivly over the net met me at the airport and drove me to the hotel.  I had been injecting in australia and only had to inject for 2 days in india then we had egg pick up.  not sure if i would go to india again as the conditions were not as i had investigated.
Just thought i would give a donors perspective on this subject as i know alot of you out there must be feeling so down at trying to find someone to help you.

hope this helps.

#12 laudie

Posted 12 July 2010 - 03:25 PM

Hi Ladies,

I am hoping you can offer me some advice.

I am 37 years old and have been doing IVF for the past 5 years. I have low ovarian reserve and have also suffered from Endo.

I have done 10 IVF cycles (two using known donors).  Sadly our latest donor cycle resulted in no eggs.

We are now thinking about looking overseas for a final push for eggs but have no idea where to start. I have been reading your posts and notice you all have some experience in this department! I have done some searching online but would very much appreciate any recommendations of clinics to look into. I have heard mention of one in San Dieago.

Anything pointers you can give me would be appreciated.

LL

#13 pisces00

Posted 13 July 2010 - 06:47 AM

check your mailbox for my message

#14 Cheetar

Posted 15 July 2010 - 12:53 PM

QUOTE (laudie @ 12/07/2010, 01:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi Ladies,

I am hoping you can offer me some advice.

I am 37 years old and have been doing IVF for the past 5 years. I have low ovarian reserve and have also suffered from Endo.

I have done 10 IVF cycles (two using known donors).  Sadly our latest donor cycle resulted in no eggs.

We are now thinking about looking overseas for a final push for eggs but have no idea where to start. I have been reading your posts and notice you all have some experience in this department! I have done some searching online but would very much appreciate any recommendations of clinics to look into. I have heard mention of one in San Dieago.

Anything pointers you can give me would be appreciated.

LL



#15 Cheetar

Posted 15 July 2010 - 01:42 PM

Hi  lady,

I had experience about egg donate oversea also. The clinic based in Bangkok ,not so far from Aus. Before that
started to do IVF 5 times. Not success . The problem in ovary. So Dr.Suggested to used egg donate and waiting
list long time. Until contact to clinic in Bkk , The clinic provide the ED. We have to chose from the profile. After
that Dr.preparation  for the schedule between  recipient and ED. for us , we start to have the progesterone to prepare our uterus. For ED ,Dr. did acupuncture 2 times and stimulate her. We got 10 eggs ,7 embrioes.
We flew to Bkk before ET 6 days. Because need our fresh sperm. ( sperm freezing can do also ). For recipient ,Dr.did acupuncture 3 times before ET. And transfer2 embi on day 5 of blastocyst. We freezing 5 embi. After that 3 days ,fly back home. We did the blood test after ET 10 days. Wow !!!! we got twin.

Every step by step before start the procedure, contact via email. The team take time to answer our Q. And Dr.
very very good consultant.  we comfortable and impressed so much.

Next  3 years, we plan to FET also.We need the big family.
For pricing very reasonable. Spent  $15000 . For flight and accomodation $ 4000, the rest including ED,IVF procedure,medicine,doctor fee,operating theater,lab,scan.

Hope can help for you.

Cheetar

#16 kimh297

Posted 15 July 2010 - 09:24 PM

There is a clinic in South Africa that is now organising for their donor to come to Australia to donate eggs.  You pay the donors fares and then presumably it at your own clinic.  Something else to consider however as internationals there would be no refund on medicare

#17 laudie

Posted 16 July 2010 - 02:11 PM

Thank you for all of your replies. I appreciate it. Does anyone have any experience with a clinic in La Jolla, San Dieago?

Many thanks
LL

#18 Clare3

Posted 06 August 2010 - 12:36 PM

Pisces00, I have just joined this site as a potential recipient and this is my first day looking through posts - just wanted to say how nice it is to your commitment to donatiing, even reaching your quota in Australia!

Always nice for recipients to see the generosity out there. Thanks!

Clare

#19 pisces00

Posted 16 August 2010 - 12:12 PM

if you pm me your email address i will drop you a line biggrin.gif

#20 tropichusband

Posted 19 August 2010 - 03:15 PM

Did anyone who travelled overseas for any IF treatment (IVF/ICSI/DE) get special medical treatment visas?



#21 bengal

Posted 04 September 2010 - 07:38 AM

Hi

Kimh297, do you know the name of the clinic that brings the Ed here to AU ?

Possmaner  - what is the agency name - that organised your egg donation procedure through Johannesburg ?

#22 wantone2

Posted 08 September 2010 - 01:10 PM

Hi ladies

My sister very kindly donated to me which resulted in my beautiful son.  The last embryo was transferred nearlt 2 weeks ago unfortunately I have tested & it is a neg - blood test is Fri.  My sister is now pregnant & I couldnt ask her again as we are so grateful for what she has already done.  I would love another baby as I have just loved the whole experience of motherhood.

I would love to know a little more about how you got started.  I would imagine that there would have been a lot of red tape to get through or does the agency look after this for you?  Do they stim like in the US - I know of someone who came back preg with twins & has 16 embryos on ice.

Is anyone able to PM me with some contact details please.

Thanks



#23 bjc24

Posted 23 September 2010 - 07:28 AM

Hi there
I have been hanging on TTC over 40 forum but thought I should probably put my head in here now and again. Regarding the clinic in South Africa JB I am not sure but I have just got back from Cape town fertility Clinic in Cape Town SA and I am pregnant....just, only 5 weeks. We used a fabulous egg donation clinic in the US Global Egg donors who have set up their business there, yet they have donors living in SA. If we went to a SA donor clinic, by law, you cannot see adult photos so by going through the US based clinic you can get around that. I am 44 DP 42. I have children from previous relationship never dreamed I would be doing this again! Anyway, eggs too old, 4 icsi cycles later we decided to just get on with it. Our donor produced 8 eggs, 7 fertilised and 3 a grade blasts. We transfered 2 and froze the other. We were so impressed with the FS, the clinic and the care - world class standard all the way. Back home in Sydney after a lovely 2 week holiday in a beautiful city and I am still in shock that the result is positive!...fingers crossed HCG keeps rising as is still early days - I just wanted to share this story incase anyone was wondering.....like we were about the whole donor egg process.
cheers

#24 twistedmama

Posted 23 September 2010 - 07:37 AM

Congratulations!!! biggrin.gif   That's wonderful news and it's nice to hear that you were looked after so well.

#25 janineO

Posted 08 July 2011 - 06:08 PM

Egg Donor cycles overseas- if you don't need her photo but are happy just to have her details, my favourite clinic in Cyprus has currently a 70% success rate with ED IVF Cycles. They charge 4500 Euro or you can do a package with airport pickups and accommodation.
If you prefer to choose your donor from photos, with detailed family information, Georgia clinic has an online database you can search and a 50-60% success rate. They charge 8,500 USD. They also allow you to meet your donor and send their donors O/S.
India is probably most affordable- from 4000 USD. There are 2 excellent clinics there that I would recommend as their facilities are modern (usually not the case in India) and their success rates are 50-60%.
I don't recommend Ukraine at the moment as they just don't produce results- research the experience/CV of the Doctor and Embryologist carefully.
If anyone would like the clinics contacts or their pricelists, feel free to message me and I'll forward.


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I lost my wife and daughters to Ebola - then it came for my son

Sunday, September 21, is a day I will never forget.

The 'yucky' illness that took over my life

I have a chronic illness nobody likes to discuss. It involves toilet talk, and probably caused my miscarriage. But it needs to be talked about.

Prenatal testing: the facts

Prenatal testing is done to check if a baby has certain medical conditions before birth. Here is some important information about what the tests are for and the risks involved.

5 things to do with your baby?s old clothes

Did you think your only option for your baby?s old clothes was to pack them away or give them to the Salvos? Think again.

Why it's possible to not realise you're pregnant until the baby arrives

After hearing about 'surprise babies' born to mums who didn't know they were pregnant, it's common to ask "how did she not realise?" But experts say it's entirely possible for it to happen.

'My miracle is finally here'

How has the world continued on its pace when mine has been altered so drastically?

Dairy can help older women fall pregnant: study

Ice cream may be the ultimate comfort food, but a study suggests it could also help older women to have children.

Megan Gale goes topless for 'sexiest people' cover

Six months after a heavily pregnant Megan Gale posed nude for Marie Claire, the glowing new mum has gone topless for the cover of another magazine.

A new perspective on life from living with two diseases

A mother shares her personal story about the difficulty of living with two conditions, one of which stops her from being able to see her daughter's face.

Warning about Children's Panadol dosage

The Therapeutic Goods Administration has issued a safety advisory warning parents about confusion when using the dosing syringe supplied with Children's Panadol.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
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What's hot on EB

Take 'The Coles Big Nappy Change' Challenge

You could become part of our Test Drive team and win one of 200 packs of Coles Little Explorer Nappies as part of our 5-day challenge.

Win 1 of 5 Canon Powershot D30 cameras

Capture life more easily with the Canon Powershot D30. Shockproof, waterproof and dustproof, you can take it almost anywhere and shoot beautiful images, time after time. Enter now!

16 parenting truths you won't find in the baby books

I am five years into this parenting gig and I’ve learnt that sleepless nights and changing dirty nappies are child’s play.

Best and worst potty party cakes

It's nice to celebrate a child making the shift from nappies to 'big kid' undies, but do we really need a semi-realistic used toilet cake to do it? Here are some of the best and worst cakes parents have used at 'potty parties' around the world.

7 tips for a financially festive Christmas

Plan ahead - and do it now - to ensure festive season expenses don't break the bank.

'Go the F*** to Sleep' author's new book for frustrated parents

A sequel is coming soon to the 2011 hit book 'Go the F*** to Sleep' - and this time, it's about mealtimes.

Great birthday party buys from Etsy

Handmade crafts to decorate and personalise your child's next birthday - from banners to cake decorations, we've got gorgeous party finds from Etsy.

Join us in The BIG nappy change

Introducing the new Coles Little Explorer Nappies! You can confidently rely on Coles Little Explorer nappies at each stage of your child's growth, so take the Big Nappy Change and try new Coles Little Explorer nappies for yourself!

Creative storage ideas for the kids' rooms

Creative and practical storage ideas for the kids' toys and books can also add some stylish decor to your home. Visit babyology.com.au for more stylish modern finds for hip kids & parents.

Weird trend

'Why we called our daughter Wyatt'

Ashton Kutcher has spoken about how he and Mila Kunis chose their daughter's name - and why they've set up her social media accounts.

To the mum in the doctor's waiting room

Maybe the mum I saw in that waiting room, seemingly disconnected from her baby, doesn’t have the support she needs.

10 space-saving nursery ideas

Starting a family doesn't always mean moving into a bigger house - not yet, anyway.

 

What's in a name?

Baby Names

Looking for a classic name, or an unusual name? Our Baby Name Finder is for you, search or browse to refine your shortlist.

 
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Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.