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Do you think your childs name can shape them as a person?


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#1 hickorydickorydock

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:11 PM

My DH and I were talking about names and he thinks that if you named a boy a real boys boy name like say Mack or something really Manly then that child will probably be more Boyish then say a boy name Julien or something like that..

And same goes for girls..

What do you think do you think a childs name moulds them to be a particular type person??

And no i'm not saying the name Julien is sissy or anything or that a boy name Julien can't be a boys boy and vice a versa..IYKWIM

#2 Future-self

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:16 PM

Ah no. I don't. Childrens personalities develop without any idea of social norms, stigmas, stereotypes or absurdities like a name being apparently being 'manly' or not.



#3 KimminyCricket

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:16 PM

I don't think that it will shape them to be manly or more feminine, but I do think a name paints a picture of a person overall - eg A child named Ephinee-rae speaks volumes.  

When naming our children, we used the "could-this-name-be-the-CEO-of-a-company" game to decide whether or not we liked them.

#4 Sally ®

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:16 PM

Well, I have an Aiden, whose name means "fiery little one".  He's not so little anymore, but he is definitely fiery.   rolleyes.gif

#5 sassymummy

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:19 PM

I dunno.

DD's name is Chanel. Not really sure what kind of person that should make her into.

My name is Stacey, and according to most American movies I should either be a bimbo, a skank or both. I can PRETEND to be both, but in actual fact I'm a shy little nerd.  tongue.gif

My brother and DP share the same name though (diff spelling) and I have noticed some similarities...

#6 PurpleWitch

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:20 PM

QUOTE
I don't think that it will shape them to be manly or more feminine, but I do think a name paints a picture of a person overall - eg A child named Ephinee-rae speaks volumes.

When naming our children, we used the "could-this-name-be-the-CEO-of-a-company" game to decide whether or not we liked them.


I agree.

Sally, shame you spelled his name wrong Tounge1.gif

#7 Baggy

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:20 PM

To be honest, I think names are just names. shrug.gif


#8 Literary Lemur

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:34 PM

QUOTE
When naming our children, we used the "could-this-name-be-the-CEO-of-a-company" game to decide whether or not we liked them


We did too but I also thought "Could this name be a kindergarten teacher?"  The name would be gorgeous on a 4 year old but will it be taken seriously as an adult name?

I do think their name plays a part in shaping their personality, values and opportunities.  People do read into a name whether we like it or not.  I do believe that some names are limiting and I wanted to open up the world for my children.

Quite unintentionally we gave both of our children non gender sounding names (one is clearly male when written) and I will watch with interest how this impacts them.

Edited by cluttergirl, 07 March 2010 - 09:36 PM.


#9 3_for_me

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:57 PM

Personally I don't think your name shapes your personality BUT I do believe that's parents choose names that reflect their own personalities and those parents are then respinsible for the vast amount of shaping that goes on in a childs early years.

I'd say a childs name can reflect the personality of their parents which in turn is reflected somewhat in their own personality.

#10 Acidulous Osprey

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:57 PM

My poor little Bimbo is really struggling with life sad.gif.  Do you think we should have named him something less gender neutral and more manly  shrug.gif ?

#11 loubee

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:02 PM

No. Thats why people get nicknames, if the name doesn't fit the nickname does.

Bimbo being the exception biggrin.gif



#12 protart roflcoptor

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:03 PM

QUOTE (hicokydickorydock @ 07/03/2010, 09:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My DH and I were talking about names and he thinks that if you named a boy a real boys boy name like say Mack or something really Manly then that child will probably be more Boyish then say a boy name Julien or something like that..

And same goes for girls..

What do you think do you think a childs name moulds them to be a particular type person??

And no i'm not saying the name Julien is sissy or anything or that a boy name Julien can't be a boys boy and vice a versa..IYKWIM


I think that the type of person that someone is perceived to be is probably also shaped by other more important factors; such as the ability to put forward an idea or proposition in writing using conventions of grammar and spelling that make the writers ideas easily understood.

#13 taddie

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:07 PM

My name did make a difference to me, being told it was nice and unusual made me feel .. nice and unusual. It can make a little difference but overall I'd say not much.

#14 Guest_BeachedAsBro_*

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:08 PM

I don't think a name shapes your personality, but I do think that a name can allow you to be judged by someone else. If you name your child Osama, Adolf, Suddam etc then you're likely to give them an inferiority complex & offend a lot of people.

Example: Vicki & Victoria, have exactly the same qualifications & experience, but Victoria gets the job based on the more professional sound of her name. There have been studies done to prove this (I can't quote them though).

#15 tenar

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:16 PM

I think meanings of names are very important.

The reason is that if you grow up knowing that your name means something strong and positive (one of my names means "light", another means "beloved"), then you look for strong, positive aspects in your own personality.  You end up identifying, just a little, with the qualities described by your names.    If they are positive qualities this can only be good, I think.

I've been very careful about choosing the meaning of my DD's name.

#16 Buzzie

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:23 PM

Nope, I know many men/women with the same names that are VERY different..

My name is Elise, so I spose quite a 'girlie' name.. and I was the biggest tomboy as a kid and everybody thought I was a boy..

#17 reneelovescraig

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:38 PM

Remember the Jane Elliott blue eyes brown eyes study?
QUOTE
...those of you who are called Patty and Debby and Susy - get over that, because we use those names to infantilize females. We keep females in their little girl state by the names we use for them. Get over it! If you want to be taken seriously, get serious! Get over it!


#18 scoutster

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:42 PM

My Dad hated his name growing up.  It was old fashioned and weird in comparison to his peers.  He remembers cringing at school everytime it was mentioned.  It contributed to his shyness and lack of self confidence.



#19 newkie

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:54 PM

QUOTE
Personally I don't think your name shapes your personality BUT I do believe that's parents choose names that reflect their own personalities and those parents are then respinsible for the vast amount of shaping that goes on in a childs early years.

I'd say a childs name can reflect the personality of their parents which in turn is reflected somewhat in their own personality.

I agree with this. I don't think a name itself does the shaping, though in the extremes as others have said, it definitely plays a part.

#20 Daddyfied

Posted 07 March 2010 - 10:56 PM

QUOTE (hicokydickorydock @ 07/03/2010, 09:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Do you think your childs name can shape them as a person?


No.

Unless you give them a highly creatve 'original' name (eg. Moon Unit), or the non-standard spelling of a common name.   In those cases, the agony of teasing and repeatedly needing to spell their name throughout their life, drives them insane, leading to eventual parricide.

#21 MothershipConnection

Posted 07 March 2010 - 11:10 PM

Interesting Daddyfide.  Can you give an example of a case of parricide which supports your opinion?  I suppose if all of the unusually named children intend on only killing their parents you can take solace in the fact that they will not be the next serial killers.  

Have you seen the wiki list of serial killer names.  It is a rather long list of quite common and 'normal' names for each country those upstanding individuals resided.  I'm quite happy to post the list from wiki if you are interested.

No, I do not think naming a boy John, or naming him Julian is any guarantee that preconceived notions about people with those names and the expectations derived from personal opinion of those names, will be affirmed.

PS - Frank Zappa died from prostate cancer.

Edited by MothershipConnection, 07 March 2010 - 11:15 PM.


#22 HighlandPinky

Posted 07 March 2010 - 11:22 PM

Hmmm, i'm not sure that the kind of name a person has has any real bearing on the type of person they turn out to be.  But i don't believe that it's completely irrelevant either.  At least it wasn't to me.

To give a bit of background information.  I changed my name when i turned 18.  The whole thing, first, middle and last names.  I grew up hating my name, and would ask people to call me by whatever name i particularly liked at any given time.  I was very shy, and had extremely low self-esteeem.  I was very depressed as a teen.  I changed my name as soon as i found one that i knew i would always love.  One that was 'me'.  To this day i think it was the best thing i have ever done.  I felt like i completely changed as a person when i changed my name.  I"m not really sure if I started to change because of the name change....or if the name changed just reflected me more iykwim.  But i'm not the same person i was growing up.  I feel like i never was that person at all.  I don't recognise my old name when someone calls it (except for my parents and grandparents, who never stopped using it).

So for me, my name was extremely important.



#23 got my tinsel on

Posted 07 March 2010 - 11:33 PM

QUOTE
I changed my name when i turned 18. The whole thing, first, middle and last names.


Wow Mrs. Doyle! That would have taken some courage to do.

I think that like another PP said that the personalities of the parents in choosing particular names has more bearing than the name itself. And no doubt I am generalising here, but I suspect that the parents who name their child Clare/Primrose (nod to you Newkie!) have completely different parenting styles and philosophies to the parents who name their child Teniqua/Shaniqua etc.

Hit edit by mistake. LOL

Edited by fancie, 07 March 2010 - 11:34 PM.


#24 koiles

Posted 07 March 2010 - 11:46 PM

I think it's not so much the name that shapes them, rather the general public's (and their circle of contacts) perceptions of that name. For most people with fairly common names I don't think their name would have any great impact on their life. Some with common names that have slightly negative connotations - eg Barry and Sharon being forever known as Bazza and Shazza may find this impacts people's perception of them. But I think those whose name plays a large part of shaping them as a person are people with very odd, unusual, spelled differently from the norm, difficult to pronounce, etc.

QUOTE (BeachedAsBro @ 07/03/2010, 11:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Example: Vicki & Victoria, have exactly the same qualifications & experience, but Victoria gets the job based on the more professional sound of her name. There have been studies done to prove this (I can't quote them though).

yyes.gif although it is never the basis of my decision when hiring people, the thought of introducing a candidate to our multi-million dollar sponsors/clients does cross my mind...when you have two people with the same qualifications and experience and one is called Jane Brown and the other Kaneesha Loleesha for example, it does make a difference. Rhyming cutesy names eg. Kayley Bayley make me think that no corporate client will take this person seriously...and unfortunately in my experience, majority of the time the clients will push these people much harder than others as their prejudices make them inclined to consider them to be a pushover. Also people going for sales roles where they rely on people contacting them I would think twice if it was a name that was overly difficult to spell (people contacting by email are more likely to get it wrong and a sale is lost), hard to pronounce (people don't like phoning a company if they know the're going to have to try and pronounce a very odd name to be put through by reception - embarrassing to get it wrong).

The sad thing is it's not the person's fault...they didn't name themselves, yet they are the one that is judged for it whether people intend to or not.

#25 Daddyfied

Posted 07 March 2010 - 11:49 PM

QUOTE (MothershipConnection @ 07/03/2010, 11:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Can you give an example of a case of parricide which supports your opinion?
Oedipus.  Hughstan Schlicker.


QUOTE (MothershipConnection @ 07/03/2010, 11:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Have you seen the wiki list of serial killer names.
No.   But I'm kind of concerned that you have.

In any case, as most of us only have two parents, 'serial' killing is hardly relevant.


QUOTE (MothershipConnection @ 07/03/2010, 11:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Frank Zappa died from prostate cancer.
That's because Moon Unit put radium in the seat of his armchair.

Edited by Daddyfied, 07 March 2010 - 11:59 PM.





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